Madison County, NY Historian

Madison County, NY Historian Madison County was founded in 1806 after being formed from Chenango County. Madison County is a largely rural county in Upstate, NY. The county is made up of 15 towns and 1 city.

It's history is long and rich featuring many exciting and important events. This page is here to help promote the many heritage events and articles that are happening throughout the towns and city. Please note that the comments expressed on this site do not reflect the opinions and position of the Madison Historian, Madison County, or its employees. Any comments on external social media sites are personal in nature and do no represent the views of the Madison County Historian or Madison County. If you have any questions concerning this social media platform, please contact the Madison County Historian.

Operating as usual

Our photos of the month come from 1977 when the Old Route 13 bridge was removed. Old Route 13 crossed over Oneida Creek ...
06/15/2021

Our photos of the month come from 1977 when the Old Route 13 bridge was removed. Old Route 13 crossed over Oneida Creek connecting the Towns of Lenox and Verona. Old Route 13 was relocated in 1949, but the bridge remained. The former Lehigh Valley Railroad ran parallel to Old Route 13 to the east. Where the bridge was located today is Beach & Lakeshore Roads.

06/15/2021

Attention History Lovers, we have some exciting news to share…

Just a reminder that tonight at 6:00 pm we will be interviewing WWII Veteran Reggie Emmons at the Canastota Public Libra...
06/07/2021

Just a reminder that tonight at 6:00 pm we will be interviewing WWII Veteran Reggie Emmons at the Canastota Public Library about his experiences in the Army in the Pacific Theatre. This event is open to the public. We hope to see you there!!!

Just a reminder that tonight at 6:00 pm we will be interviewing WWII Veteran Reggie Emmons at the Canastota Public Library about his experiences in the Army in the Pacific Theatre. This event is open to the public. We hope to see you there!!!

Recently we digitized a collection of postcards from throughout Madison County.  This week we are highlighting a postcar...
06/03/2021

Recently we digitized a collection of postcards from throughout Madison County. This week we are highlighting a postcard of the former H.B. Blanchard clothing store in DeRuyter (village), New York. Henry Byron Blanchard was born in the village in 1879. His father operated a wagon factory on Lincklaen Street. Byron went to work for his uncle's clothing store after graduation. Around 1912 Byron bought out his uncle and operated the clothing store himself until his death in September of 1932

Our June Record of the month are pages from the Visitors log for the Madison County Children's Home which was located in...
06/01/2021

Our June Record of the month are pages from the Visitors log for the Madison County Children's Home which was located in Peterboro. This book is a log of all of the people who came to visit the site from 1871 to 1926. The building was razed in 1938. The book contains no information on the residents of the home, it simply lists the visitors names, and home town. Visitors occasionally wrote down a poem, or bible verse as well.

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice...
05/31/2021

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Robert G. Landringham was born in Utica in June of 1941. He graduated from Madison Central School where he was the President of his Senior Class. Following graduation Landringham enrolled at SUNY Morrisville and received an associate’s degree in applied science. After graduation he joined the US Air Force and was appointed an aviation cadet in 1961. He trained at James Connally Air Force Base in Texas and was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant and Navigator in September of 1962. Following his promotion, he was assigned to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware where he served in the Military Air Transport Service. Landringham was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in 1964 and was assigned to the Tactical Air Command as a Navigator on a B-57.

Lanrdingham was killed in action when the plane he was on was struck during battle on June 29 1965. The plane lost a wing and crashed approximately two miles from Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines. His remains were returned home and he is interred at Madison Village Cemetery.

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Robert G. Landringham was born in Utica in June of 1941. He graduated from Madison Central School where he was the President of his Senior Class. Following graduation Landringham enrolled at SUNY Morrisville and received an associate’s degree in applied science. After graduation he joined the US Air Force and was appointed an aviation cadet in 1961. He trained at James Connally Air Force Base in Texas and was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant and Navigator in September of 1962. Following his promotion, he was assigned to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware where he served in the Military Air Transport Service. Landringham was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in 1964 and was assigned to the Tactical Air Command as a Navigator on a B-57.

Lanrdingham was killed in action when the plane he was on was struck during battle on June 29 1965. The plane lost a wing and crashed approximately two miles from Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines. His remains were returned home and he is interred at Madison Village Cemetery.

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice...
05/31/2021

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Clifford J Bruinsma was born May 30, 1929 in Fenner. Bruinsma attended Cazenovia Central School before enlisting in the Army in the spring of 1948. He trained in Japan for six months before returning to the states for additional training. That is when he was assigned to the 187th Airborne Infantry at Fort Campbell, KY in August of 1950. That September, Bruinsma saw action on the Kimp peninsula northwest of Seoul, Korea. On March 26, 1951, he was killed in action, likely as part of Operation Tomahawk. Bruinsma’s remains were returned in October of 1951 and he is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Cazenovia.

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Clifford J Bruinsma was born May 30, 1929 in Fenner. Bruinsma attended Cazenovia Central School before enlisting in the Army in the spring of 1948. He trained in Japan for six months before returning to the states for additional training. That is when he was assigned to the 187th Airborne Infantry at Fort Campbell, KY in August of 1950. That September, Bruinsma saw action on the Kimp peninsula northwest of Seoul, Korea. On March 26, 1951, he was killed in action, likely as part of Operation Tomahawk. Bruinsma’s remains were returned in October of 1951 and he is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Cazenovia.

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice...
05/31/2021

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Raymond Harsma was born in Oneida in April of 1920. He graduated from Oneida High School and enrolled in Niagara University. Upon graduation from Niagara in 1943, Harsma entered the Navy and was assigned to Navy Officers’ School at Notre Dame University. He was commissioned an Ensign and was then assigned to Submarines School in New London, Connecticut.

In February of 1944, Harsma married Jean Samal. After which he was assigned to the south pacific and eventually placed on the submarine USS S-28.

In July 1944, the USS-S-28 was lost at sea during drills off the coast of Hawaii. The submarine lost contact at 6:20 pm and was never heard from beyond a diesel fuel slick from near where it was lost two days later. Harsma was among the 49 men who were lost at sea. Harsma is memorialized on the Court of the Missing in Honolulu and at Saint Helena’s Cemetery in Oneida.

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Raymond Harsma was born in Oneida in April of 1920. He graduated from Oneida High School and enrolled in Niagara University. Upon graduation from Niagara in 1943, Harsma entered the Navy and was assigned to Navy Officers’ School at Notre Dame University. He was commissioned an Ensign and was then assigned to Submarines School in New London, Connecticut.

In February of 1944, Harsma married Jean Samal. After which he was assigned to the south pacific and eventually placed on the submarine USS S-28.

In July 1944, the USS-S-28 was lost at sea during drills off the coast of Hawaii. The submarine lost contact at 6:20 pm and was never heard from beyond a diesel fuel slick from near where it was lost two days later. Harsma was among the 49 men who were lost at sea. Harsma is memorialized on the Court of the Missing in Honolulu and at Saint Helena’s Cemetery in Oneida.

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice...
05/31/2021

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Theodore Mead was born in Morrisville in 1885. He graduated from Morrisville schools and then attended Cornell University, graduating in 1908 and then graduated from Cornell Medical School in 1913. In 1912 he married Lena R. Fahnestock of Ithaca, the couple had a daughter, Elizabeth in 1916.

In June of 1916, Mead volunteered in the First Field Artillery and was stationed at the United States-Mexican border, before he was mustered out in November of 1916. was After completing officer’s school in Plattsburg in 1917 he was commissioned a First Lieutenant in the Medical Corps.. Before being sent overseas in June of 1918, Mead was stationed at Camp Wadsworth (South Carolina) and at Camp Stuart (Virginia).

Lieutenant Mead was promoted to Captain in March of 1918 and assigned to the 104th Field Artillery. A few short months later, Mead died from wounds he received in action in France on October 19, 1918. Major George Augustine wrote to Mrs. Mead about Theodore’s death in December of 1918:

“The Regiment had been in rest billets for a few days after having been constantly in the line since Sept. 9th, expecting to remain there for three weeks. But on Oct. 28th the regiment was again ordered into action.

The end battalion, your husband as battalion surgeon, left the rest camp on the morning of the 28th and advanced north of Verdun. That night it crossed to the east side of the Meuse, and early on the morning of the 29th took up a position east of the village of Brabant.

Captain Mead established his aid post and went to battalion headquarters dugout. He left this station shortly after 11 am to return to his aid post. At just this time the enemy began to shell the road very heavily and before the captain and his orderly Marvin, who was with him, could seek shelter a shell fragment struck the captain in the upper right arm.

This was on October 29th at 11:30 am. Marvin immediately cut the clothes away from the wound and applied a shell dressing which stopped all hemorrhaging. At 11:45 an ambulance and medical officer came. The officer examined the arm and administered an op**te in preparation for the long ride to the evacuation hospital at Verdun, twenty kilometers away. The captain was fully conscious at the time. The shell fragment had broken the arm, but we thought that was the most serious part of his wound. I did not see him myself, not coming up to the position with regimental headquarters until that afternoon.

We heard nothing more of the captain, the regiment remaining in action until the armistice was signed and not returning to Verdun until November 19th.

The next day I went to the evacuation hospital at Glorieux just outside of Verdun to see what base hospital Captain Mead had been evacuated, as I wanted to get in touch with him.

I was dismayed to learn that the ambulance had arrived at the hospital at 1:45 and that the officers then had found the captain in shock and that he died at 2:20 pm less than three hours after he was hit.

I could not believe it until I had examined the records and finally found his final resting place with his identification tag fastened to the cross at the head of the grave.

It was a terrible shock to me to learn that the captain was dead instead of on the road to recovery, as we had every reason to believe he would be. A piece of shell had evidently passed through the upper arm and into the chest. The officers at the hospital told me that he did not suffer but gradually and calmly went to sleep. He rests in the section of the large military cemetery at Glorieux, a short distance outside of Verdun…”

Captain Mead’s brother Leland was killed also in France, on October 4, 1918. Both men are buried at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery & Memorial in France. A memorial to the brothers is located at the Morrisville Rural Cemetery.

In remembrance of Memorial Day, we will remember just a few of those from Madison County who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Theodore Mead was born in Morrisville in 1885. He graduated from Morrisville schools and then attended Cornell University, graduating in 1908 and then graduated from Cornell Medical School in 1913. In 1912 he married Lena R. Fahnestock of Ithaca, the couple had a daughter, Elizabeth in 1916.

In June of 1916, Mead volunteered in the First Field Artillery and was stationed at the United States-Mexican border, before he was mustered out in November of 1916. was After completing officer’s school in Plattsburg in 1917 he was commissioned a First Lieutenant in the Medical Corps.. Before being sent overseas in June of 1918, Mead was stationed at Camp Wadsworth (South Carolina) and at Camp Stuart (Virginia).

Lieutenant Mead was promoted to Captain in March of 1918 and assigned to the 104th Field Artillery. A few short months later, Mead died from wounds he received in action in France on October 19, 1918. Major George Augustine wrote to Mrs. Mead about Theodore’s death in December of 1918:

“The Regiment had been in rest billets for a few days after having been constantly in the line since Sept. 9th, expecting to remain there for three weeks. But on Oct. 28th the regiment was again ordered into action.

The end battalion, your husband as battalion surgeon, left the rest camp on the morning of the 28th and advanced north of Verdun. That night it crossed to the east side of the Meuse, and early on the morning of the 29th took up a position east of the village of Brabant.

Captain Mead established his aid post and went to battalion headquarters dugout. He left this station shortly after 11 am to return to his aid post. At just this time the enemy began to shell the road very heavily and before the captain and his orderly Marvin, who was with him, could seek shelter a shell fragment struck the captain in the upper right arm.

This was on October 29th at 11:30 am. Marvin immediately cut the clothes away from the wound and applied a shell dressing which stopped all hemorrhaging. At 11:45 an ambulance and medical officer came. The officer examined the arm and administered an op**te in preparation for the long ride to the evacuation hospital at Verdun, twenty kilometers away. The captain was fully conscious at the time. The shell fragment had broken the arm, but we thought that was the most serious part of his wound. I did not see him myself, not coming up to the position with regimental headquarters until that afternoon.

We heard nothing more of the captain, the regiment remaining in action until the armistice was signed and not returning to Verdun until November 19th.

The next day I went to the evacuation hospital at Glorieux just outside of Verdun to see what base hospital Captain Mead had been evacuated, as I wanted to get in touch with him.

I was dismayed to learn that the ambulance had arrived at the hospital at 1:45 and that the officers then had found the captain in shock and that he died at 2:20 pm less than three hours after he was hit.

I could not believe it until I had examined the records and finally found his final resting place with his identification tag fastened to the cross at the head of the grave.

It was a terrible shock to me to learn that the captain was dead instead of on the road to recovery, as we had every reason to believe he would be. A piece of shell had evidently passed through the upper arm and into the chest. The officers at the hospital told me that he did not suffer but gradually and calmly went to sleep. He rests in the section of the large military cemetery at Glorieux, a short distance outside of Verdun…”

Captain Mead’s brother Leland was killed also in France, on October 4, 1918. Both men are buried at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery & Memorial in France. A memorial to the brothers is located at the Morrisville Rural Cemetery.

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Wampsville, NY
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Comments

I'm looking for info on a family in that area around 1823. Do you know if there are any birth records for that time period?
If anyone has old photographs, postcards, tools or equipment related to Madison County hop history, we would interested in seeing them. We celebrate that history at Foothill Hops Farm Brewery.
I'm wondering if you may be able to help me find the source for the information transcribed below. A man transcribed this and shared on the old USGENWEB genealogy site in the 1990s. But, he didn't say what source he transcribed it from. I'm researching one of my potential ancestors (Conrad Burgdoff), and would like to verify that the transcription is correct. It looks like this documents court proceedings that took place over a number of years, where Conrad and then his widow, Jerusha, applied for a pension for his service in the Revolutionary War. I've included this link to where I found it: http://files.usgwarchives.net/ny/madison/military/revwar/pensions/burgdoff-conrad.txt Thank you!
A question for the Historian. Has Madison County ever had a Law Library open to the taxpaying public to use? It is my understanding that the first woman lawyer was in Madison County. We should build a Public Law Library Collection for public use in her name.
Thought you might be interested in our new book! Get your copy of A Journey Through Time, available at the Cortland County Historical Society (25 Homer Ave. Cortland, 1-5 pm, Tuesday-Saturday) and by MAILORDER (https://drive.google.com/open?id=1IoOmf-qQgxxqOq9c4SamKUqt_o_TlYuJ). The cost is $40.50 plus tax for members, and $45.00 plus tax for non-members. See the order form link for more details. In 1958, Cortland County celebrated it's 150th anniversary with a series of events and the publication of the Cortland County Sesquicentennial Souvenir Yearbook: 1808-1958. With 8,000 copies printed, nearly every family in Cortland County purchased the book. 60 years later, and ten years after the celebration of our county's Bicentennial in 2008, the Cortland County Historical Society has published A Journey Through Time: Cortland County, 1958-2018. Three years in the making, this book picks up where the 1958 book left off and is the Society's largest publication to date continuing our long tradition of publishing Cortland County's history. Lead authors and co-editors, Jean Edwards and Liz Wavle-Brown collected stories, photographs and advertisements from over 200 people. You won't want to miss getting your copy of this collectible book, sure to be enjoyed for generations to come.
Love looking back at the village in the 1800's.
My grandmother, Laura Bartholomew worked for the Madison County Veterans Dept for years .
Hi, I am looking for John Taibe. Either his book a ride through the countryside on the syracuse and chenango valley railroad. Or even knowing where he lives. My 81 year old Mother-in-law has seen the book and loves it.
Apply 2020census.gov/jobs
Thanks for the invite to your page🙂 Beautiful posts !!
Done!!