Rock Creek Park

Rock Creek Park Official page of Rock Creek Park, a unit of the National Park Service-- www.nps.gov/rocr An oasis in our nation's capital, the park offers hiking and biking trails, historical sites and exhibits, nature and planetarium programs and more.

Operating as usual

#OrphanSunday is a day to raise awareness about the plight of orphans worldwide. Today we'd like to draw attention to an...
11/07/2021
Joshua Peirce Klingle (U.S. National Park Service)

#OrphanSunday is a day to raise awareness about the plight of orphans worldwide. Today we'd like to draw attention to an orphan who had an impact on Rock Creek Park's history.

Learn about Joshua Peirce Klingle on our website at https://www.nps.gov/people/joshua-peirce-klingle.htm.

Joshua Peirce Klingle was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1835. His parents were Dr. George F. Klingle and Juliet P. Coats. His mother died in 1837 and his father remarried. Unfortunately, Dr. Klingle died in 1840, leaving his eldest son and orphan.

Yesterday, there were over 10 vehicle break-ins at Rock Creek Park. This is a reminder not to leave anything at all in y...
11/06/2021

Yesterday, there were over 10 vehicle break-ins at Rock Creek Park. This is a reminder not to leave anything at all in your vehicle—especially valuables—even if hidden.

In one case, a vehicle may have been broken into because of a closed cardboard box.

Call the U.S. Park Police at 202-610-7505 if you see suspicious activity in action or if your vehicle has been broken into. This is the fastest method for assistance.

If you see something, say something.

Even later, you can leave an anonymous tip by calling or texting the USPP at 888-361-3332 or 202-379-4877. Or, you can send an email to [email protected].

U.S. Park Police

#stopcrime #SeeSomethingSaySomething

Yesterday, there were over 10 vehicle break-ins at Rock Creek Park. This is a reminder not to leave anything at all in your vehicle—especially valuables—even if hidden.

In one case, a vehicle may have been broken into because of a closed cardboard box.

Call the U.S. Park Police at 202-610-7505 if you see suspicious activity in action or if your vehicle has been broken into. This is the fastest method for assistance.

If you see something, say something.

Even later, you can leave an anonymous tip by calling or texting the USPP at 888-361-3332 or 202-379-4877. Or, you can send an email to [email protected].

U.S. Park Police

#stopcrime #SeeSomethingSaySomething

Today is National Bison Day! A day celebrating our National Mammal, and it’s the animal that the National Park Service c...
11/06/2021
Bison (U.S. National Park Service)

Today is National Bison Day! A day celebrating our National Mammal, and it’s the animal that the National Park Service choose to represent wildlife protection on the National Park Service symbol/patch. The National Park Service works to protect these tremendous creatures who are the largest land animals in North America and significant to Indigenous cultural heritage.

Let's celebrate the majesty of the American bison.

Visit the link below to learn more about the American bison:
https://www.nps.gov/subjects/bison/index.htm

#VisitAPark, #NPS, #NationalBisonDay

Bison are much more than America's largest land mammal. They are an essential part of American history and embody the strong and resilient characteristics of the American people - so much so that they were designated as our National Mammal in 2016. Once numbering ~30 million and ranging across the U...

What do Peirce Mill, Hattie Sewell, and half-smokes have in common?Sandwiches! 🥪Let me explain. Peirce Mill, a 19th-cent...
11/03/2021
History of Peirce Mill - Rock Creek Park (U.S. National Park Service)

What do Peirce Mill, Hattie Sewell, and half-smokes have in common?

Sandwiches! 🥪

Let me explain. Peirce Mill, a 19th-century mill located in Rock Creek Park was long used as a gristmill, turning wheat and other grains into flour. Flour is a key ingredient in standard bread for delicious sandwiches.

In the early 20th-century, the mill was renovated into a teahouse, and Hattie Sewell became the successful proprietor from 1920-21 before she was pushed out by a family member of the original mill-owning family.

Finally, half-smokes. This DC-staple (usually a sausage-like preparation of beef and pork) is arguably one of the best culinary traditions of Washington, DC. Nothing, I mean nothing, hits the spot quite like a half-smoke.

And there you have it, three sandwich-related facts, and three new things to learn about on National Sandwich Day!

To learn more about Peirce Mill, visit https://www.nps.gov/rocr/learn/historyculture/peirce-mill-history.htm

To learn more about Hattie Sewell, please visit: https://www.nps.gov/people/hattie-l-sewell.htm

To learn more about half-smokes, please visit: https://washington.org/visit-dc/dc-signature-half-smoke-all-you-need-to-know

#NationalSandwichDay #FOPMDC #RockCreekPark #PeirceMill #MyDCcool

Isaac Peirce (1756-1841) was born to Quaker parents in Pennsylvania. He married a woman named Elizabeth Cloud in 1778. In 1788, Isaac and Elizabeth left Pennsylvania to make a new life for themselves and their young family in Maryland. Isaac originally purchased 150 acres of land along Rock Creek. T...

#DidYouKnow that in 2016, Rock Creek Park celebrated the National Park Service Centennial by hosting a bat inventory dur...
10/30/2021

#DidYouKnow that in 2016, Rock Creek Park celebrated the National Park Service Centennial by hosting a bat inventory during BioBlitz. Scientists (and citizen scientist helpers!) came to the park and counted bats. During this event, the bats caught were weighed, measured and checked for evidence of #WhiteNoseSyndrome.

Bats are studied in national parks across the country. These studies help rangers understand how healthy the bat population is in addition to the rest of the environment since bats are what is known as an "indicator species."

Pokey the hard-shell bat thinks he should be involved in the next bat inventory and catalogued as a new species.

To learn more about the 2016 BioBlitz study read the article at https://www.nps.gov/articles/batinventory.htm

#BatWeek #BatStudy #FindYourPark #FindYourBat

#DidYouKnow that in 2016, Rock Creek Park celebrated the National Park Service Centennial by hosting a bat inventory during BioBlitz. Scientists (and citizen scientist helpers!) came to the park and counted bats. During this event, the bats caught were weighed, measured and checked for evidence of #WhiteNoseSyndrome.

Bats are studied in national parks across the country. These studies help rangers understand how healthy the bat population is in addition to the rest of the environment since bats are what is known as an "indicator species."

Pokey the hard-shell bat thinks he should be involved in the next bat inventory and catalogued as a new species.

To learn more about the 2016 BioBlitz study read the article at https://www.nps.gov/articles/batinventory.htm

#BatWeek #BatStudy #FindYourPark #FindYourBat

Bats across the world face numerous threats. White-nose syndrome in the U.S. threatens several species of bats, includin...
10/29/2021

Bats across the world face numerous threats. White-nose syndrome in the U.S. threatens several species of bats, including those that make Rock Creek Park home, like the little brown bat and the northern long-eared bat. White-nose syndrome is caused by a fungus which affects hibernating bats. The illness can leave scarring on their wings and make them fly during the day or in the wintertime when they should be hibernating. The illness also causes them to burn the fat they need to survive during the winters.

Don’t worry---Pokey doesn’t have #WhiteNoseSyndrome. He just likes his calcium supplements.

#Batweek #BatFacts #MessyEater

Bats across the world face numerous threats. White-nose syndrome in the U.S. threatens several species of bats, including those that make Rock Creek Park home, like the little brown bat and the northern long-eared bat. White-nose syndrome is caused by a fungus which affects hibernating bats. The illness can leave scarring on their wings and make them fly during the day or in the wintertime when they should be hibernating. The illness also causes them to burn the fat they need to survive during the winters.

Don’t worry---Pokey doesn’t have #WhiteNoseSyndrome. He just likes his calcium supplements.

#Batweek #BatFacts #MessyEater

Today is Navy Day! This special observance was established by the Navy League in 1922, in recognition of those serving i...
10/27/2021

Today is Navy Day!

This special observance was established by the Navy League in 1922, in recognition of those serving in the U.S. Navy. The date was chosen on the #birthday of former President Theodore Roosevelt. Prior to being elected President, Theodore Roosevelt served as assistant secretary of the Navy. In addition, during his presidency, he was an advocate of the Navy and worked to strengthen the nation's fleet.

In addition to being an advocate of the Navy, Roosevelt was an advocate of National Parks. He frequented Rock Creek Park and even as president, found time to visit. He stated in his autobiography, "When our children were little, we were for several winters in Washington, and each Sunday afternoon the whole family spent in Rock Creek Park, which was then very real country indeed.”

Learn more about the 26th President from our friends at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site https://www.nps.gov/sahi/index.htm

#NavyDay #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque

Today is Navy Day!

This special observance was established by the Navy League in 1922, in recognition of those serving in the U.S. Navy. The date was chosen on the #birthday of former President Theodore Roosevelt. Prior to being elected President, Theodore Roosevelt served as assistant secretary of the Navy. In addition, during his presidency, he was an advocate of the Navy and worked to strengthen the nation's fleet.

In addition to being an advocate of the Navy, Roosevelt was an advocate of National Parks. He frequented Rock Creek Park and even as president, found time to visit. He stated in his autobiography, "When our children were little, we were for several winters in Washington, and each Sunday afternoon the whole family spent in Rock Creek Park, which was then very real country indeed.”

Learn more about the 26th President from our friends at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site https://www.nps.gov/sahi/index.htm

#NavyDay #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque

10/27/2021

Hey Pokey! Can you hear that?

Have you ever heard hundreds of chirps as you walk through the neighborhoods at the edge of Rock Creek Park at night and wondered what was making those noises? They aren’t birds--but are several species of bats that call Rock Creek Park home. These cute yet misunderstood critters are the unsung heroes of the forest, eating tons of insects and pollinating flowers.

The last week of the spookiest month in the year is #BatWeek. So, go outside and keep your ears open for those hard-working bats.

#WildlifeWednesday #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque

Caption: A yellow box turtle with red eyes and paper bat wings attached to his shell stares intently at a still image of a bat. Bat noises comprise the audio.

From all of us at Rock Creek Park to you....Happy Pumpkin Day!#PumpkinDay #FindYourPark #FindYourPumpkin  🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃...
10/26/2021

From all of us at Rock Creek Park to you....Happy Pumpkin Day!

#PumpkinDay #FindYourPark #FindYourPumpkin

🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃
Alt Text: The outline of the Park Service Arrowhead logo glows faintly orange. The Bison, Water and Snowcapped peak, along with the lettering for "National Park Service" is a brighter yellow. The Tree and grass appears dark. The image is obviously carved into a pumpkin.

From all of us at Rock Creek Park to you....Happy Pumpkin Day!

#PumpkinDay #FindYourPark #FindYourPumpkin

🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃🎃
Alt Text: The outline of the Park Service Arrowhead logo glows faintly orange. The Bison, Water and Snowcapped peak, along with the lettering for "National Park Service" is a brighter yellow. The Tree and grass appears dark. The image is obviously carved into a pumpkin.

Hey Pokey! Bats are your friends. DC’s bats eat lots of flying, bloodsucking mosquitos. Rock Creek Park is home to six s...
10/26/2021

Hey Pokey! Bats are your friends. DC’s bats eat lots of flying, bloodsucking mosquitos.

Rock Creek Park is home to six species of bats, including the little brown bat, which is particularly well-known as a mosquito eater. If that’s not enough to make you like bats, bats throughout the world pollinate or spread seeds for many of our favorite foods, such as the seeds of the cacao tree – best known as the source of chocolate.

So how can you return the favor and be a friend to bats? Some options include reducing the use of herbicides and pesticides, which can be bad for bats or by installing a bat box in your yard.

Pokey, is that a bat-turtle box that you are standing on? It’s a bit different from a regular bat box. To learn more about bat boxes, visit the MD Department Natural Resources webpage.

https://dnr.maryland.gov/wildlife/Pages/plants_wildlife/bats/batboxes.aspx

For a list of mammals that can be found in ROCR, including all six bat species, visit the mammals page on our website:

https://www.nps.gov/rocr/learn/nature/mammals.htm

#batweek #rockcreekpark

Hey Pokey! Bats are your friends. DC’s bats eat lots of flying, bloodsucking mosquitos.

Rock Creek Park is home to six species of bats, including the little brown bat, which is particularly well-known as a mosquito eater. If that’s not enough to make you like bats, bats throughout the world pollinate or spread seeds for many of our favorite foods, such as the seeds of the cacao tree – best known as the source of chocolate.

So how can you return the favor and be a friend to bats? Some options include reducing the use of herbicides and pesticides, which can be bad for bats or by installing a bat box in your yard.

Pokey, is that a bat-turtle box that you are standing on? It’s a bit different from a regular bat box. To learn more about bat boxes, visit the MD Department Natural Resources webpage.

https://dnr.maryland.gov/wildlife/Pages/plants_wildlife/bats/batboxes.aspx

For a list of mammals that can be found in ROCR, including all six bat species, visit the mammals page on our website:

https://www.nps.gov/rocr/learn/nature/mammals.htm

#batweek #rockcreekpark

This October 24th, we recognize the 76th anniversary of United Nations Day. The United Nations is committed to working o...
10/24/2021
Climate Change (U.S. National Park Service)

This October 24th, we recognize the 76th anniversary of United Nations Day. The United Nations is committed to working on issues like the fight against climate change. Rock Creek Park and the National Park Service are also committed to being stewards of environmental protection and education in the continuing efforts against climate change.

To learn more about National Park Service efforts related to climate change, visit https://www.nps.gov/subjects/climatechange/index.htm.

#UNDay #ClimateChange #FindYourPark

The National Park Service is responsible for many of our nation's most treasured places. Efforts to restore ecosystems, recover imperiled species, enhance visitor infrastructure, and protect night skies are all important to preserving our parks for the benefit of all visitors. But as human activity....

As we kick off #BatWeek2021, let's get back to basics and share some background information about bats: they're #mammals...
10/24/2021

As we kick off #BatWeek2021, let's get back to basics and share some background information about bats: they're #mammals, they're in #danger, they're important to many different #ecosystems, and they're a #diverse group.

Over the next week, follow Pokey the "hard-shell bat" to learn more about bats and their importance to Rock Creek Park.

#DidYouKnow, Rock Creek Park is home to six different species of bats?
🦇 big brown bat
🦇 eastern red bat
🦇 hoary bat
🦇 mouse-eared bat
🦇 little brown bat
🦇 northern long-eared bat

#FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #FindYourBat

As we kick off #BatWeek2021, let's get back to basics and share some background information about bats: they're #mammals, they're in #danger, they're important to many different #ecosystems, and they're a #diverse group.

Over the next week, follow Pokey the "hard-shell bat" to learn more about bats and their importance to Rock Creek Park.

#DidYouKnow, Rock Creek Park is home to six different species of bats?
🦇 big brown bat
🦇 eastern red bat
🦇 hoary bat
🦇 mouse-eared bat
🦇 little brown bat
🦇 northern long-eared bat

#FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #FindYourBat

Join Rock Creek Park and the Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park in celebrating the 10th anniversary of Georgetown Wat...
10/17/2021

Join Rock Creek Park and the Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park in celebrating the 10th anniversary of Georgetown Waterfront Park!

Would you like to learn more about the history of the park? There will be two ranger-led talks today at 2:15 p.m. and 3 p.m. OR join us for another ranger-led talk on an upcoming weekend. Details will be posted as calendar entries on the Rock Creek Park page and website, as well as on Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park's social media and website.

Hope to see you in the park soon!

Join Rock Creek Park and the Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park in celebrating the 10th anniversary of Georgetown Waterfront Park!

Would you like to learn more about the history of the park? There will be two ranger-led talks today at 2:15 p.m. and 3 p.m. OR join us for another ranger-led talk on an upcoming weekend. Details will be posted as calendar entries on the Rock Creek Park page and website, as well as on Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park's social media and website.

Hope to see you in the park soon!

Timeline Photos
10/11/2021

Timeline Photos

Prior to invasion & colonization by Europeans, the Americas were home to thousands of Indigenous Americans. In the #ChesapeakeBay watershed alone, there were dozens of distinct tribes with their own languages, cultures, and customs.

An interactive map below will show you which groups lived anywhere in our region and across the continent. When you #FindYourChesapeake, remember and honor the Native peoples who originally lived on this land.

https://native-land.ca/

#IndigenousPeoplesDay

Address

5200 Glover Road NW
Washington D.C., DC
20015

Opening Hours

Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 5pm
Sunday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

(202) 895-6000

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Rock Creek Park posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services


Other Washington D.C. government services

Show All

Comments

Scout is missing! Lost her in this park yesterday afternoon! If you find her please call or text Sarah Dorval 207-319-6786. She's an indoor kitty do she may be very nervous and afraid. Thank you all!❤️
Anything happening at Fort Stevens this year?
The main entrance to the park (nature center and planetarium) is BLOCKED OFF and you cannot get in. Super frustrating and irritating, especially since this is not noted anywhere on the park's website. We drove all the way from Leesburg only to not be able to get into the park. Please post this prominently on your page here and on your website so folks don't waste time on the roads, gas and tolls to ultimately come and see... nothing.
Does anyone know if the trails leading out of the nature center are clear of ice and snow? We want to walk there tomorrow.
Can you tell me what these are? Anchored in concrete, almost in the creek bed - off Beach Drive near the Jusserand Memorial. UPDATE: Remains of a 1901 footbridge destroyed by Hurricane Agnes in 1972. Thanks to John De Ferrari for his help.
Boulder bridge. #rockcreekpark
Is the Old Stone House still closed?
Do you have any maps for your trails? 😊☺️
How best to report a super stinky dead deer in RCP, just south of the Klingle Ford Bridge? Been there since Saturday...