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This ventriloquist dummy is part of the records of the National Labor Relations Board, so we're assuming it's not a haun...
10/29/2021

This ventriloquist dummy is part of the records of the National Labor Relations Board, so we're assuming it's not a haunted doll that climbs out of its archival box at night to roam the stacks looking for victims.

However, there is no identifying case information with this dummy, so we really can't be sure.

So....absolutely nothing to be scared of. Nothing at all.

Happy Halloween!

This ventriloquist dummy is part of the records of the National Labor Relations Board, so we're assuming it's not a haunted doll that climbs out of its archival box at night to roam the stacks looking for victims.

However, there is no identifying case information with this dummy, so we really can't be sure.

So....absolutely nothing to be scared of. Nothing at all.

Happy Halloween!

Stick a pin in it, we're done! American Archives Month is coming to a close, but we're still keeping it together. From p...
10/28/2021

Stick a pin in it, we're done! American Archives Month is coming to a close, but we're still keeping it together. From pins to paper clips, we look at the evolution of what (temporarily) holds papers together.

https://go.usa.gov/xexjZ
#ArchivesMonth

Stick a pin in it, we're done! American Archives Month is coming to a close, but we're still keeping it together. From pins to paper clips, we look at the evolution of what (temporarily) holds papers together.

https://go.usa.gov/xexjZ
#ArchivesMonth

Don't lose your head with excitement, but today's virtual program features Washington Irving (portrayed by Neill Hartley...
10/28/2021
National Archives Comes Alive! Young Learners Program: Meet Washington Irving

Don't lose your head with excitement, but today's virtual program features Washington Irving (portrayed by Neill Hartley), author of the iconic Halloween story “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.”

Meet Washington Irving, the father of the American short story and author of one of the most famous and iconic Halloween stories: “The Legend of Sleepy Hollo...

“I am researching @USArmy baseball teams stationed in Occupied Japan/Philippines at the end of World War II. I have phot...
10/28/2021

“I am researching @USArmy baseball teams stationed in Occupied Japan/Philippines at the end of World War II. I have photos of team members which included my father who was a pitcher. I have located several newspaper articles but have been unsuccessful in finding any specific information. There was a 'Japanese #WorldSeries' in September, 1946. Any information about these players and the teams would be appreciated.”

See the answer to our #QuestionoftheWeek on History Hub, our crowdsourced platform for history and genealogical research where anyone can ask questions and get answers from archivists and other community members.

https://historyhub.history.gov/thread/13022?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=QOTW&utm_content=ArmyBaseballJapan-20211027

“I am researching @USArmy baseball teams stationed in Occupied Japan/Philippines at the end of World War II. I have photos of team members which included my father who was a pitcher. I have located several newspaper articles but have been unsuccessful in finding any specific information. There was a 'Japanese #WorldSeries' in September, 1946. Any information about these players and the teams would be appreciated.”

See the answer to our #QuestionoftheWeek on History Hub, our crowdsourced platform for history and genealogical research where anyone can ask questions and get answers from archivists and other community members.

https://historyhub.history.gov/thread/13022?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=QOTW&utm_content=ArmyBaseballJapan-20211027

It's the final week of American Archives Month! When faced with mold, paper clips, and potentially radioactive records, ...
10/27/2021

It's the final week of American Archives Month! When faced with mold, paper clips, and potentially radioactive records, archivists say the darnedest things.

What's the "most archivist" statement you've ever said on the job?

It's the final week of American Archives Month! When faced with mold, paper clips, and potentially radioactive records, archivists say the darnedest things.

What's the "most archivist" statement you've ever said on the job?

David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, is proud to honor  Beverly, Massachusetts, as his hometown. Today he'...
10/27/2021
Archivist of the United States David Ferriero honors Beverly, Massachusetts

David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, is proud to honor Beverly, Massachusetts, as his hometown. Today he's sharing a special piece of history about George Washington's visit to Beverly in 1789.

https://youtu.be/1SXOhRgqLZI

#HonorYourHometown

David Ferriero, the 10th Archivist of the United States, pays tribute to his hometown of Beverly, Massachusetts which was at the heart of the Industrial Revo...

One hundred years ago this week, soldiers carried the Unknown Soldier aboard the USS Olympia to begin the long journey a...
10/26/2021

One hundred years ago this week, soldiers carried the Unknown Soldier aboard the USS Olympia to begin the long journey across the ocean from France to the United States.

On October 24, 1921, Sgt. Younger of the US Army had selected the Unknown World War I soldier by placing white roses on a casket at the city hall in Chalons-en-Champagne. The Unknown Soldier had then lain in state at the Place de L 'Hotel DeVille in Chalons-Sur-Marne before travelling by train to the port city of Le Havre, where ceremonies honored the unknown American soldier. Millions of French citizens lined the streets to watch the procession.

Before the coffin was brought aboard the USS Olympia, the French Minister of Pensions decorated the Unknown Soldier with the Cross of the Legion of Honor. On October 25, 1921, the USS Olympia departed the dock at Le Havre, France, headed for Washington, DC. The ship would arrive at the Navy Yard on November 9, 1921.

See more of the journey of the Unknown Soldier, go to https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/100th-anniversary-of-the-tomb-of-the-unknown-soldier/swISrH8agbdiKQ

Image: https://catalog.archives.gov/id/209280078

One hundred years ago this week, soldiers carried the Unknown Soldier aboard the USS Olympia to begin the long journey across the ocean from France to the United States.

On October 24, 1921, Sgt. Younger of the US Army had selected the Unknown World War I soldier by placing white roses on a casket at the city hall in Chalons-en-Champagne. The Unknown Soldier had then lain in state at the Place de L 'Hotel DeVille in Chalons-Sur-Marne before travelling by train to the port city of Le Havre, where ceremonies honored the unknown American soldier. Millions of French citizens lined the streets to watch the procession.

Before the coffin was brought aboard the USS Olympia, the French Minister of Pensions decorated the Unknown Soldier with the Cross of the Legion of Honor. On October 25, 1921, the USS Olympia departed the dock at Le Havre, France, headed for Washington, DC. The ship would arrive at the Navy Yard on November 9, 1921.

See more of the journey of the Unknown Soldier, go to https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/100th-anniversary-of-the-tomb-of-the-unknown-soldier/swISrH8agbdiKQ

Image: https://catalog.archives.gov/id/209280078

This October marks 150 years since the Great Chicago Fire. Although Mrs. O’Leary’s legendary cow has been exonerated, th...
10/25/2021

This October marks 150 years since the Great Chicago Fire. Although Mrs. O’Leary’s legendary cow has been exonerated, the fire’s exact origin on the night of October 8, 1871, remains unknown.

Once ignited, the fire quickly raged out of control thanks to ferocious winds, extremely dry conditions, and plenty of fuel. By the time rain extinguished the final flames on October 10, the conflagration had consumed The Loop (Chicago’s central business district), left an estimated 300 people dead, and one-third of the city’s residents homeless.

At the time, Chicago was built almost entirely of wood. Even the Chicago River, which was packed with wooden docks and vessels along its banks, did little to halt the conflagration. After hitting The Loop, the fire jumped the Chicago River’s main branch and destroyed virtually the entire North Division of the city before dying out.

Fires were a common occurrence in Chicago, and few residents took notice when alarm bells rang out from the city’s West Side. Panic set in once the fire jumped the river and moved toward the heart of the city. Assembled 70 years after the last flames died out, this poem, published 1941's "Gone to Blazes: Episodes in Verse About the Great Chicago Fire," still powerfully conveys the terror and confusion as people fled for their lives.

Recovering required an equally great rebuilding effort. Over 17,000 structures were destroyed in a more than three square mile area known as the “Burnt District.” The National Archives holds a 1872 petition sent to the U.S. Senate in an effort to secure financial relief from tariffs and import duties on building materials.

The city recovered quickly; however, Chicagoans did not benefit equally. Poorer residents who lacked the resources of the wealthy faced much greater hardship rebuilding their homes and reclaiming their livelihoods.

You can see this document and others on display in the East Rotunda Gallery through November 16, 2021, or online https://go.usa.gov/xeq3y

***
Image: Page 5 from "Gone to Blazes: Episodes in Verse About the Great Chicago Fire," 1941. National Archives Identifier 1416418.

This October marks 150 years since the Great Chicago Fire. Although Mrs. O’Leary’s legendary cow has been exonerated, the fire’s exact origin on the night of October 8, 1871, remains unknown.

Once ignited, the fire quickly raged out of control thanks to ferocious winds, extremely dry conditions, and plenty of fuel. By the time rain extinguished the final flames on October 10, the conflagration had consumed The Loop (Chicago’s central business district), left an estimated 300 people dead, and one-third of the city’s residents homeless.

At the time, Chicago was built almost entirely of wood. Even the Chicago River, which was packed with wooden docks and vessels along its banks, did little to halt the conflagration. After hitting The Loop, the fire jumped the Chicago River’s main branch and destroyed virtually the entire North Division of the city before dying out.

Fires were a common occurrence in Chicago, and few residents took notice when alarm bells rang out from the city’s West Side. Panic set in once the fire jumped the river and moved toward the heart of the city. Assembled 70 years after the last flames died out, this poem, published 1941's "Gone to Blazes: Episodes in Verse About the Great Chicago Fire," still powerfully conveys the terror and confusion as people fled for their lives.

Recovering required an equally great rebuilding effort. Over 17,000 structures were destroyed in a more than three square mile area known as the “Burnt District.” The National Archives holds a 1872 petition sent to the U.S. Senate in an effort to secure financial relief from tariffs and import duties on building materials.

The city recovered quickly; however, Chicagoans did not benefit equally. Poorer residents who lacked the resources of the wealthy faced much greater hardship rebuilding their homes and reclaiming their livelihoods.

You can see this document and others on display in the East Rotunda Gallery through November 16, 2021, or online https://go.usa.gov/xeq3y

***
Image: Page 5 from "Gone to Blazes: Episodes in Verse About the Great Chicago Fire," 1941. National Archives Identifier 1416418.

During the Civil War, government clerks used huge quantities of red tape, from tying bundles of related papers together ...
10/22/2021

During the Civil War, government clerks used huge quantities of red tape, from tying bundles of related papers together to sealing official documents to tying shut envelopes.

In the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864, the offices of the headquarters of the War Department bought a total of 154 miles of red tape.

Conditions in the field were a little dearer. According to Army regulations during the war, each company was entitled to a quarterly issue of the following stationery supplies: five quires (120 sheets) of writing paper, ½ quire of envelope paper, 20 quills, ½ ounce of wafers, three ounces of sealing wax, one paper of ink powder, and one piece [3¾ yards] of “office tape.”

Read more on the Pieces of History blog: go.usa.gov/xMuFT

Image: National Archives photo of red tape keeping a bundle of documents together.

During the Civil War, government clerks used huge quantities of red tape, from tying bundles of related papers together to sealing official documents to tying shut envelopes.

In the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864, the offices of the headquarters of the War Department bought a total of 154 miles of red tape.

Conditions in the field were a little dearer. According to Army regulations during the war, each company was entitled to a quarterly issue of the following stationery supplies: five quires (120 sheets) of writing paper, ½ quire of envelope paper, 20 quills, ½ ounce of wafers, three ounces of sealing wax, one paper of ink powder, and one piece [3¾ yards] of “office tape.”

Read more on the Pieces of History blog: go.usa.gov/xMuFT

Image: National Archives photo of red tape keeping a bundle of documents together.

“Where can I find information about the battleship USS Massachusetts? I am looking for engine room diagrams, machinery d...
10/21/2021

“Where can I find information about the battleship USS Massachusetts? I am looking for engine room diagrams, machinery drawings, and photos of the interior and exterior of the USS Massachusetts (BB-59).”

See the answer to our #QuestionoftheWeek on #HistoryHub, our crowdsourced platform for history and genealogical research where anyone can ask questions and get answers from archivists and other community members.

https://historyhub.history.gov/thread/13216?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=QOTW&utm_content=USSMassachusettsBB59-20211021

“Where can I find information about the battleship USS Massachusetts? I am looking for engine room diagrams, machinery drawings, and photos of the interior and exterior of the USS Massachusetts (BB-59).”

See the answer to our #QuestionoftheWeek on #HistoryHub, our crowdsourced platform for history and genealogical research where anyone can ask questions and get answers from archivists and other community members.

https://historyhub.history.gov/thread/13216?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=QOTW&utm_content=USSMassachusettsBB59-20211021

The Emancipation Proclamation and General Orders No. 3 will be on display at the National Archives Museum from November ...
10/20/2021

The Emancipation Proclamation and General Orders No. 3 will be on display at the National Archives Museum from November 19 to 21, 2021.

Timed ticket entry is required, and tickets are limited. You can reserve a ticket at https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/234645

Image: Reenactors of the B Company, 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, U.S. Colored Troops, stand watch over the Emancipation Proclamation during the special display for the 150th anniversary, January 1, 2013. Photo by Charles Fazio.

The Emancipation Proclamation and General Order No. 3 Featured Document Presentation is made possible in part by the National Archives Foundation through the generous support of The Boeing Company.

The Emancipation Proclamation and General Orders No. 3 will be on display at the National Archives Museum from November 19 to 21, 2021.

Timed ticket entry is required, and tickets are limited. You can reserve a ticket at https://www.recreation.gov/ticket/facility/234645

Image: Reenactors of the B Company, 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, U.S. Colored Troops, stand watch over the Emancipation Proclamation during the special display for the 150th anniversary, January 1, 2013. Photo by Charles Fazio.

The Emancipation Proclamation and General Order No. 3 Featured Document Presentation is made possible in part by the National Archives Foundation through the generous support of The Boeing Company.

Before passwords, wax seals--along with ribbons and embossed paper seals--secured important information by making it har...
10/19/2021

Before passwords, wax seals--along with ribbons and embossed paper seals--secured important information by making it hard to tamper with a document without damaging it.

Ribbons were used to attach documents, but they also served as proof against tampering. The clerk would cut slits in the paper or parchment, weave the ribbon through it, and then the signatories or government official would attach their wax seal, attach an embossed paper seal to the paper with sealing wax or a wafer, or emboss the paper itself.

Parchment has a slicker, tougher surface than paper, and it’s difficult to keep sealing wax adhered to its surface or emboss it clearly. Ribbon woven through paper help keep the seals affixed to the document.

This 1842 Treaty with the Wyandots, which is on paper, used two different types of ribbon. The pink is a linen tape that is holding a sheet of the document together, while the green is a silk ribbon under an embossed paper seal, attached to the paper with a big red sealing wafer.

By the mid-to-late 19th century, wax seals had fallen out of common use due to the creation of pre-gummed envelopes. Today, seals and ribbons are used for decorative purposes for special occasions rather than document security.

See more seals on the Pieces of History blog post: https://go.usa.gov/xMHJ2

#ArchivesMonth

Before passwords, wax seals--along with ribbons and embossed paper seals--secured important information by making it hard to tamper with a document without damaging it.

Ribbons were used to attach documents, but they also served as proof against tampering. The clerk would cut slits in the paper or parchment, weave the ribbon through it, and then the signatories or government official would attach their wax seal, attach an embossed paper seal to the paper with sealing wax or a wafer, or emboss the paper itself.

Parchment has a slicker, tougher surface than paper, and it’s difficult to keep sealing wax adhered to its surface or emboss it clearly. Ribbon woven through paper help keep the seals affixed to the document.

This 1842 Treaty with the Wyandots, which is on paper, used two different types of ribbon. The pink is a linen tape that is holding a sheet of the document together, while the green is a silk ribbon under an embossed paper seal, attached to the paper with a big red sealing wafer.

By the mid-to-late 19th century, wax seals had fallen out of common use due to the creation of pre-gummed envelopes. Today, seals and ribbons are used for decorative purposes for special occasions rather than document security.

See more seals on the Pieces of History blog post: https://go.usa.gov/xMHJ2

#ArchivesMonth

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Hi, I am in receipt of a silver box the surface of which is signed by about 20 people. It is approximately 3” x 7” and wood lined, sort of like a cigarette box. The top is engraved with The High Commission Constantinople - 1924. Looks like it could have been to mark an occasion. What can you tell me? Regards, Ty Ford
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