U.S. Capitol Visitor Center

U.S. Capitol Visitor Center Welcome to the U.S. Capitol. The main entrance is located beneath the East Front plaza of the U.S. C Please note: Only comments pertaining to our posts will be published.

The Capitol is among the most architecturally impressive and symbolically important buildings in the world. The Senate and the House of Representatives have met here for more than two centuries. Begun in 1793, the Capitol has been built, burnt, rebuilt, extended, and restored. Today, it stands as a monument not only to its builders but also to the American people and their government. Whether you

The Capitol is among the most architecturally impressive and symbolically important buildings in the world. The Senate and the House of Representatives have met here for more than two centuries. Begun in 1793, the Capitol has been built, burnt, rebuilt, extended, and restored. Today, it stands as a monument not only to its builders but also to the American people and their government. Whether you

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The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center honors all veterans for their service to our nation.#veteransday Photo courtesy of the A...
11/11/2021

The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center honors all veterans for their service to our nation.

#veteransday

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center honors all veterans for their service to our nation.

#veteransday

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Standing Bear (or Macunajin in the Omaha-Ponca language) was born in what is now Nebraska in 1829. He was chief of the P...
11/10/2021

Standing Bear (or Macunajin in the Omaha-Ponca language) was born in what is now Nebraska in 1829. He was chief of the Ponca tribe living near the banks of the Niobara River. With the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, Indigenous tribes, including the Ponca, were forced to sell their land and move to Indian Territory (what is now Oklahoma). Sometimes called the Ponca Trail of Tears, the journey to Oklahoma was grueling, and the Ponca lost almost a third of the tribe.

Standing Bear lost his wife and daughter, and his eldest son died after arriving in Oklahoma. To fulfill his son’s dying wish, Standing Bear traveled back to Nebraska to bury him. The U.S. Army’s orders prohibited the Ponca from leaving the territory. Standing Bear was arrested in Omaha, making national news as he and his lawyers sued the federal government for false imprisonment.

In Standing Bear v. George Crook, the U.S. government argued that Standing Bear was neither a citizen nor a person, therefore he could not sue the government. His lawyers argued that under the 14th Amendment, Standing Bear and the Ponca tribe were citizens and entitled to the same constitutional rights. Judge Elmer Dundy’s opinion agreed, “an Indian is a person within the means of the United States.” The judge released Standing Bear and the Ponca tribe, and he was able to bury his son.

#chiefstandingbear #nativeamericanheritagemonth #ponca #omaha #nebraska #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Standing Bear (or Macunajin in the Omaha-Ponca language) was born in what is now Nebraska in 1829. He was chief of the Ponca tribe living near the banks of the Niobara River. With the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, Indigenous tribes, including the Ponca, were forced to sell their land and move to Indian Territory (what is now Oklahoma). Sometimes called the Ponca Trail of Tears, the journey to Oklahoma was grueling, and the Ponca lost almost a third of the tribe.

Standing Bear lost his wife and daughter, and his eldest son died after arriving in Oklahoma. To fulfill his son’s dying wish, Standing Bear traveled back to Nebraska to bury him. The U.S. Army’s orders prohibited the Ponca from leaving the territory. Standing Bear was arrested in Omaha, making national news as he and his lawyers sued the federal government for false imprisonment.

In Standing Bear v. George Crook, the U.S. government argued that Standing Bear was neither a citizen nor a person, therefore he could not sue the government. His lawyers argued that under the 14th Amendment, Standing Bear and the Ponca tribe were citizens and entitled to the same constitutional rights. Judge Elmer Dundy’s opinion agreed, “an Indian is a person within the means of the United States.” The judge released Standing Bear and the Ponca tribe, and he was able to bury his son.

#chiefstandingbear #nativeamericanheritagemonth #ponca #omaha #nebraska #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

The official 2021 United States Congressional Ornament is here! Shop our broad assortment of ornaments that celebrate Co...
11/09/2021

The official 2021 United States Congressional Ornament is here! Shop our broad assortment of ornaments that celebrate Congress and the U.S. Capitol at our gift shop.

#MadeinAmerica #CapitolHill #giftideas #holidaygiftguide #historylovers #historybuff #americanhistory #rotunda #christmasornaments #christmasdecor #peoplestree

The official 2021 United States Congressional Ornament is here! Shop our broad assortment of ornaments that celebrate Congress and the U.S. Capitol at our gift shop.

#MadeinAmerica #CapitolHill #giftideas #holidaygiftguide #historylovers #historybuff #americanhistory #rotunda #christmasornaments #christmasdecor #peoplestree

Po’pay was born in 1630 in what is now New Mexico. He was a Tewa Pueblo religious leader responsible for the healing and...
11/09/2021

Po’pay was born in 1630 in what is now New Mexico. He was a Tewa Pueblo religious leader responsible for the healing and the spiritual life of his people. In 1676, Po’pay and 45 other Pueblo leaders were arrested by the Spanish authorities and charged with sorcery. Three men were executed and Po’pay was severely whipped. After his release Po’pay traveled to San Juan, New Mexico and spent five years organizing a military uprising against the Spanish known as the Pueblo Revolt. The revolt successfully pushed the Spanish to Santa Fe and saved Pueblo land and culture. In 2005, New Mexico gifted a statue of Po’pay to the National Statuary Hall Collection. It stands in Emancipation Hall.

#popay #pueblonation #nativeamericanheritagemonth #pueblorevolt1680 #sanjuannewmexico #newmexico #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection #emancipationhall

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Po’pay was born in 1630 in what is now New Mexico. He was a Tewa Pueblo religious leader responsible for the healing and the spiritual life of his people. In 1676, Po’pay and 45 other Pueblo leaders were arrested by the Spanish authorities and charged with sorcery. Three men were executed and Po’pay was severely whipped. After his release Po’pay traveled to San Juan, New Mexico and spent five years organizing a military uprising against the Spanish known as the Pueblo Revolt. The revolt successfully pushed the Spanish to Santa Fe and saved Pueblo land and culture. In 2005, New Mexico gifted a statue of Po’pay to the National Statuary Hall Collection. It stands in Emancipation Hall.

#popay #pueblonation #nativeamericanheritagemonth #pueblorevolt1680 #sanjuannewmexico #newmexico #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection #emancipationhall

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Sequoyah was a trader, blacksmith, silversmith, and served in the U.S. Army from 1813-1814. Understanding the power of w...
11/08/2021

Sequoyah was a trader, blacksmith, silversmith, and served in the U.S. Army from 1813-1814. Understanding the power of written language and believing increased knowledge would allow the Cherokee to have independence, Sequoyah developed a table of symbols for the 86 sounds of the Cherokee language. It took 12 years to complete. Once approved by the tribal council, thousands of Cherokee learned to read and write in their own language. The state of Oklahoma gave this statue of Sequoyah to the National Statuary Hall Collection in 1917.

#sequoyah #nativeamericanheritagemonth #cherokeenation #oklahoma #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Sequoyah was a trader, blacksmith, silversmith, and served in the U.S. Army from 1813-1814. Understanding the power of written language and believing increased knowledge would allow the Cherokee to have independence, Sequoyah developed a table of symbols for the 86 sounds of the Cherokee language. It took 12 years to complete. Once approved by the tribal council, thousands of Cherokee learned to read and write in their own language. The state of Oklahoma gave this statue of Sequoyah to the National Statuary Hall Collection in 1917.

#sequoyah #nativeamericanheritagemonth #cherokeenation #oklahoma #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

What role did Native Americans play in America's wars? How did the statue of Chief Standing Bear get to the Capitol? How...
11/07/2021

What role did Native Americans play in America's wars? How did the statue of Chief Standing Bear get to the Capitol? How accurate are popular depictions of Pocahontas?

We will discuss all of this and more this week on Capitol Conversations, online at 1 p.m.

Monday, November 8 – The Percy Jones Caucus
Tuesday, November 9 – Native Americans & the Military
Wednesday, November 10 – Chief Standing Bear
Friday, November 12 – The Myth of Pocahontas

Please note: There will not be a Capitol Conversation on Thursday, November 11, in observance of Veterans Day.

Register at https://www.visitthecapitol.gov/capitol-conversations

What role did Native Americans play in America's wars? How did the statue of Chief Standing Bear get to the Capitol? How accurate are popular depictions of Pocahontas?

We will discuss all of this and more this week on Capitol Conversations, online at 1 p.m.

Monday, November 8 – The Percy Jones Caucus
Tuesday, November 9 – Native Americans & the Military
Wednesday, November 10 – Chief Standing Bear
Friday, November 12 – The Myth of Pocahontas

Please note: There will not be a Capitol Conversation on Thursday, November 11, in observance of Veterans Day.

Register at https://www.visitthecapitol.gov/capitol-conversations

The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center commemorates Native American Heritage Month. Our gift shop features hand-made jewelry, c...
11/06/2021

The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center commemorates Native American Heritage Month. Our gift shop features hand-made jewelry, carvings, pottery and more from Pueblo, Navajo, and Cherokee Tribes.

https://shop.visitthecapitol.gov/

#GiftShop #giftideas #holidaygifts #holidaygiftguide #historylovers #historybuff #nativeamericanart #nativeamericanhistory #nativeamericanheritagemonth

The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center commemorates Native American Heritage Month. Our gift shop features hand-made jewelry, carvings, pottery and more from Pueblo, Navajo, and Cherokee Tribes.

https://shop.visitthecapitol.gov/

#GiftShop #giftideas #holidaygifts #holidaygiftguide #historylovers #historybuff #nativeamericanart #nativeamericanhistory #nativeamericanheritagemonth

Raised as a warrior, Chief Washakie was known for his bravery, wisdom and foresight, which earned him the respect of his...
11/05/2021

Raised as a warrior, Chief Washakie was known for his bravery, wisdom and foresight, which earned him the respect of his tribe. Chief Washakie saw the approaching westward expansion of American settlers and negotiated with the U.S. Army to ensure the preservation of more than 3 million acres in Wyoming’s Wind River country for his people. The valley remains the home of the Shoshone today. The state of Wyoming sent the statue of Chief Washakie to the U.S. Capitol in 2000. It stands in Emancipation Hall.

#chiefwashakie #nativeamericanheritagemonth #shoshonenation #wyoming #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection #emancipationhall

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Raised as a warrior, Chief Washakie was known for his bravery, wisdom and foresight, which earned him the respect of his tribe. Chief Washakie saw the approaching westward expansion of American settlers and negotiated with the U.S. Army to ensure the preservation of more than 3 million acres in Wyoming’s Wind River country for his people. The valley remains the home of the Shoshone today. The state of Wyoming sent the statue of Chief Washakie to the U.S. Capitol in 2000. It stands in Emancipation Hall.

#chiefwashakie #nativeamericanheritagemonth #shoshonenation #wyoming #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection #emancipationhall

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

#OTD in 1879, Will Rogers was born near Claremont, Oklahoma, on land belonging to the Cherokee Nation. His career ranged...
11/04/2021

#OTD in 1879, Will Rogers was born near Claremont, Oklahoma, on land belonging to the Cherokee Nation. His career ranged from performer, silent movie actor, a newspaper columnist, radio broadcaster and author. Known for his political acumen and wit, he touched the conscience of Americans during difficult times like World War I. The statue of Will Rogers was sent by the state of Oklahoma to the National Statuary Hall collection as a gift in 1939.

#willrogers #nativeamericanheritagemonth #cherokeenation #oklahoma #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

#OTD in 1879, Will Rogers was born near Claremont, Oklahoma, on land belonging to the Cherokee Nation. His career ranged from performer, silent movie actor, a newspaper columnist, radio broadcaster and author. Known for his political acumen and wit, he touched the conscience of Americans during difficult times like World War I. The statue of Will Rogers was sent by the state of Oklahoma to the National Statuary Hall collection as a gift in 1939.

#willrogers #nativeamericanheritagemonth #cherokeenation #oklahoma #uscapitol #nationalstatuaryhallcollection

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Our online store is proud to announce this year’s 2021 Commemorative Ornaments, crafted with marble used to build the U....
11/02/2021

Our online store is proud to announce this year’s 2021 Commemorative Ornaments, crafted with marble used to build the U.S. Capitol steps. The marble was removed during renovations, and has been repurposed so you can bring home a piece of history. Enjoy this memento on your tree this year!

https://shop.visitthecapitol.gov/

#MadeinAmerica #CapitolHill #GiftShop #giftideas #holidaygifts #holidaygiftguide #historylovers #historybuff #americahistory #rotunda #christmasornaments #christmasdecor #peoplestree

Our online store is proud to announce this year’s 2021 Commemorative Ornaments, crafted with marble used to build the U.S. Capitol steps. The marble was removed during renovations, and has been repurposed so you can bring home a piece of history. Enjoy this memento on your tree this year!

https://shop.visitthecapitol.gov/

#MadeinAmerica #CapitolHill #GiftShop #giftideas #holidaygifts #holidaygiftguide #historylovers #historybuff #americahistory #rotunda #christmasornaments #christmasdecor #peoplestree

11/02/2021

#OTD in 1995 Congress dedicated this bust of Raoul Wallenberg, credited with saving the lives of tens of thousands of people during the Holocaust. The plaque reads, "A shining light in a dark and depraved world, he proved that one person with the courage to care can make a difference."
In 2009 Congress moved the bust to Emancipation Hall In the Capitol Visitor Center.

Throughout November, Capitol Conversations will commemorate Native American Heritage Month. This week at 1 p.m. join us ...
11/01/2021
Capitol Conversations

Throughout November, Capitol Conversations will commemorate Native American Heritage Month. This week at 1 p.m. join us for discussions on Washington, D.C., as a federal city, the only Native American vice president, sculptures on the East Front of the Capitol and more!

• Monday, November 1 – Native American Heritage Month
• Tuesday, November 2 – Capital with an "A": Establishing a Federal City
• Wednesday, November 3 – The East Front Sculptures
• Thursday, November 4 – Charles Curtis

Please note there will be no Capitol Conversation on November 5.

Register at https://www.visitthecapitol.gov/capitol-conversations

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

The Capitol Visitor Center remains closed. We are not taking tour reservations at this time. Please check out our video tours and other online resources.

Sandstone from Aquia, Virginia was used in the Capitol’s construction until marble became more easily accessible for Hou...
10/31/2021

Sandstone from Aquia, Virginia was used in the Capitol’s construction until marble became more easily accessible for House and Senate extensions. During 20th century renovations, some of these materials were removed and are now a part of our gift shop’s collection of ornaments, paperweights and more.

Please visit: https://shop.visitthecapitol.gov/

#MadeinAmerica #CapitolHill #GiftShop #giftideas #holidaygifts #holidaygiftguide #historylovers #historybuff #americahistory

Sandstone from Aquia, Virginia was used in the Capitol’s construction until marble became more easily accessible for House and Senate extensions. During 20th century renovations, some of these materials were removed and are now a part of our gift shop’s collection of ornaments, paperweights and more.

Please visit: https://shop.visitthecapitol.gov/

#MadeinAmerica #CapitolHill #GiftShop #giftideas #holidaygifts #holidaygiftguide #historylovers #historybuff #americahistory

Happy Nevada Day! #OTD in 1864, the state of Nevada joined the Union to become the 36th state. Annually, Nevadans commem...
10/31/2021

Happy Nevada Day! #OTD in 1864, the state of Nevada joined the Union to become the 36th state. Annually, Nevadans commemorate this anniversary on the last Friday of October. In 2005, Nevada gifted Congress with a bronze statue of Paiute author and activist Sarah Winnemucca that stands in Emancipation Hall.

#sarahwinnemucca #nevadahistory #emancipationhall

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Happy Nevada Day! #OTD in 1864, the state of Nevada joined the Union to become the 36th state. Annually, Nevadans commemorate this anniversary on the last Friday of October. In 2005, Nevada gifted Congress with a bronze statue of Paiute author and activist Sarah Winnemucca that stands in Emancipation Hall.

#sarahwinnemucca #nevadahistory #emancipationhall

Photo courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

#DYK from October 30 to October 31, 2005, civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks lay in honor in the U.S. Capitol? Renowned for...
10/30/2021

#DYK from October 30 to October 31, 2005, civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks lay in honor in the U.S. Capitol? Renowned for awakening a new phase of the Civil Rights movement, Parks’ protest helped launch the Montgomery Bus Boycott where African Americans in Montgomery, Alabama, refused to ride segregated public transportation.

When she died, Parks became the first woman and the second African American to lie in honor in the Capitol’s Rotunda. In 2013, nearly 100 years after her birth, a statue of Rosa Parks—the first full length statue of an American American—was unveiled in National Statuary Hall.

#rosaparks #civilrightsactivist #civilrightsmovement #montgomerybusboycott #lyinginhonorceremony #nationalstatuaryhall

Photos courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol

Happy birthday to President John Adams, born #otd in 1735 this day in Quincy, Massachusetts. “You will think me transpor...
10/30/2021

Happy birthday to President John Adams, born #otd in 1735 this day in Quincy, Massachusetts.

“You will think me transported with Enthusiasm but I am not.—I am well aware of the Toil and Blood and Treasure, that it will cost Us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States.—Yet through all the Gloom I can see the Rays of ravishing Light and Glory. I can see that the End is more than worth all the Means. And that Posterity will tryumph [sic.] in that Days Transaction, even altho We should rue it, which I trust in God We shall not.”
--John Adams in a letter to his wife Abigail Adams, 1776.

#johnadams #foundingfather

Photos courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol and the U.S. Senate Collection

Happy birthday to President John Adams, born #otd in 1735 this day in Quincy, Massachusetts.

“You will think me transported with Enthusiasm but I am not.—I am well aware of the Toil and Blood and Treasure, that it will cost Us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States.—Yet through all the Gloom I can see the Rays of ravishing Light and Glory. I can see that the End is more than worth all the Means. And that Posterity will tryumph [sic.] in that Days Transaction, even altho We should rue it, which I trust in God We shall not.”
--John Adams in a letter to his wife Abigail Adams, 1776.

#johnadams #foundingfather

Photos courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol and the U.S. Senate Collection

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