The Hoya Battalion: Georgetown Army ROTC

The Hoya Battalion: Georgetown Army ROTC Official page of the Hoya Battalion: Georgetown Army ROTC. Participating cadets are from the following DC schools: AU, GU, GWU, and CUA.
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Operating as usual

Cadet Salvador, a Catholic University cadet based out of Fort Lewis, WA, completed the Battalion’s first virtual contrac...
10/06/2020

Cadet Salvador, a Catholic University cadet based out of Fort Lewis, WA, completed the Battalion’s first virtual contracting on Sept. 25, 2020.

Because of COVID-19 restrictions, Cadet Salvador could not be in Washington, D.C. But his father, Col. Salvador swore him in via Zoom. We are proud to have him join and wish him the best of luck!
#NeminiCedimus

This past weekend, the Hoya Battalion completed the first phase of Operation Agile Leader, the condensed summer training...
09/23/2020

This past weekend, the Hoya Battalion completed the first phase of Operation Agile Leader, the condensed summer training required for commissioning.

MSIVs were tested on their abilities to lead platoons in a COVID-conscious environment at the joint training effort with George Mason University Army ROTC and Howard University Army ROTC.

George Mason University Army ROTC
09/22/2020

George Mason University Army ROTC

This past weekend, Patriot Battalion, along with Hoya Battalion and Bison Battalion, participated at Operation Agile Leader in order to master their tactical knowledge and develop their core leadership capabilities. While the hills were high and the amount of sleep was low, all cadets came out of the woods Sunday afternoon with a sense of proficiency and confidence in their abilities to lead Soldiers as future 2nd Lieutenants.

Hoya Battalion
Howard University Army ROTC-Bison Battalion
U.S. Army Cadet Command (ROTC)
4th Brigade ROTC

Last week the Battalion hit off the semester with our first APFT. Cadets practiced COVID-19 prevention measures includin...
09/14/2020

Last week the Battalion hit off the semester with our first APFT. Cadets practiced COVID-19 prevention measures including socially-distanced push-ups and sit-ups. Here are scenes from the test. #HoyaHustle

09/11/2020
U.S. Army Cadet Command (ROTC)

U.S. Army Cadet Command (ROTC)

"We will never forget" is more than a phrase. It is a testament of who we are as people and as a country.

We will #NeverForget the lives we lost on September 11, 2001.

On Patriot Day, we also honor the service members who courageously answered the call to defend our nation.

Join #ArmyROTC in observing #PatriotDay with a moment of silence beginning at 8:46 AM Eastern Daylight Time

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command 1st Brigade Army ROTC - Spartans 2nd "Freedom" Brigade Army ROTC 3rd ROTC Brigade, The Black Hawk Brigade @4th Brigade ROTC 5th Brigade Army ROTC 6th BDE Army ROTC 7th Brigade ROTC 8th Brigade Army ROTC

Video by Elliot Valdez

This week’s workout focuses on cardio intervals as well as abs.The purpose of this workout is to increase speed and endu...
08/17/2020

This week’s workout focuses on cardio intervals as well as abs.

The purpose of this workout is to increase speed and endurance for one’s run time on both the APFT and ACFT. With limited access to equipment, exercises like these are always an option to strengthen physical performance.
#HoyaHustle #PT

This week’s #HoyaHighlight is Cadet Rizaldo Salvador, a rising MS2 from Catholic University who studies international bu...
08/14/2020

This week’s #HoyaHighlight is Cadet Rizaldo Salvador, a rising MS2 from Catholic University who studies international business and minors in both Chinese and economics.

This summer, Cadet Salvador aided his family with their PCS to JBLM, WA from West Point, NY while continuing his studies in Mandarin Chinese, Hebrew and Economics. He hopes to study abroad next summer. Also, despite COVID-19, Cadet Salvador has found time to practice his marksmanship at the gun range while following social distancing guidelines. Rizaldo wants to apply his knowledge and training received during his time at CUA along with his experience living overseas for 13 years in his future Army career.

Cadet Salvador says that he joined Army ROTC and sought to commission as a 2LT because he wanted to follow in the footsteps of his father and mother. He hopes to branch Military Intelligence or Finance.

This week’s workout is a strength circuit created by Cadet Rizaldo Salvador from CUA.The purpose of this workout is to c...
08/10/2020

This week’s workout is a strength circuit created by Cadet Rizaldo Salvador from CUA.

The purpose of this workout is to cover all the muscle groups used in both the APFT and ACFT in one workout, following the order that the events are completed.

Don’t forget to properly hydrate before and after your workouts. Peak physical fitness includes not only exercise, but proper rest and nutrition. Check out the link below for more information.
https://p3.amedd.army.mil/performance-learning-center/nutrition/hydration
#HoyaHustle #PT #MondayMotivation

This week’s workout focuses on muscular endurance and is presented by Cadet Sofia Fagan from GW.The purpose of this work...
08/03/2020

This week’s workout focuses on muscular endurance and is presented by Cadet Sofia Fagan from GW.

The purpose of this workout is to exert one’s arms and abs and build strength in areas necessary for success in both the APFT and ACFT.

Exercise is just one of the three pillars of Army fitness. Cadets should also try complementing a workout with optimal nutrient timing! For tips on how to do this, check out the information from the Army Performance Triad found in the link below.

https://p3.amedd.army.mil/performance-learning-center/nutrition/nutrient-timing

#HoyaHustle #PT #MondayMotivation

This week’s #HoyaHighlight is Cadet Daniel Kidd, an MS4 from American University majoring in international economics.Thi...
07/31/2020

This week’s #HoyaHighlight is Cadet Daniel Kidd, an MS4 from American University majoring in international economics.

This summer, Cadet Kidd is working as an operations analyst at Prescient Edge, a defense contractor specializing in mission support and research, development, and engineering in support of the Department of Defense and general intelligence community.

Kidd said that he became involved in ROTC because he believes that everyone should serve their country somehow. He hopes to commission as an active duty Infantry Officer with a branch detail to Military Intelligence and serve as long as he is able.

This week’s workout is a HIIT circuit suggested by Cadet Emmett Lee from CUA.The purpose of this workout is to mirror th...
07/27/2020

This week’s workout is a HIIT circuit suggested by Cadet Emmett Lee from CUA.

The purpose of this workout is to mirror the intensity of the Army Combat Fitness Test through high-energy, muscle-burning exercises in a short amount of time with little rest.
#HoyaHustle #PT #MondayMotivation

This week’s #HoyaHighlight is Cadet Julien Lubell, a rising MS3 from George Washington University who studies political ...
07/23/2020

This week’s #HoyaHighlight is Cadet Julien Lubell, a rising MS3 from George Washington University who studies political science and French.

This summer, Cadet Lubell had an internship on Capitol Hill lined up. Unfortunately, COVID-19 caused a cancellation in the program, but he found other ways to be productive. Lubell wanted to maintain his physical fitness and continue developing his rope-tying skills, so he built a rock wall in his backyard for climbing and anchoring.

Cadet Lubell says that Army ROTC helps keep him engaged with his academic studies while maintaining a high level of physical and mental fitness. Upon graduation, he would like to branch Military Intelligence or Infantry.

This Workout of the Week, presented by Cadet Grant Burrough’s squad from GU, features both a sprint and HIIT set.The pur...
07/20/2020

This Workout of the Week, presented by Cadet Grant Burrough’s squad from GU, features both a sprint and HIIT set.

The purpose of this combination is to increase both aerobic and muscular endurance in order to simulate the exercise variation found in the Army Combat Fitness Test.
#HoyaHustle #PT

Our #HoyaHighlight this week is Cadet Nicholos Sinopoli, a rising MS3 at American University majoring in foreign policy ...
07/16/2020

Our #HoyaHighlight this week is Cadet Nicholos Sinopoli, a rising MS3 at American University majoring in foreign policy and national security with a minor in Russian area studies.

Instead of studying abroad in Russia this summer as scheduled, Cadet Sinopoli is interning with the Counter Terrorism Group while also teaching French to middle schoolers through the nonprofit tutoring service Student Sphere.

When he graduates, Cadet Sinopoli wants to become an active duty Armor officer and eventually switch to Civil Affairs.

⁣This week's workout is a HIIT Ladder presented by Cadet Quinn O'Hagan of AU. Be sure to tag #HoyaHustle if you use the ...
07/13/2020

⁣This week's workout is a HIIT Ladder presented by Cadet Quinn O'Hagan of AU. Be sure to tag #HoyaHustle if you use the workout!

The purpose of these exercises is to combine ACFT and APFT bodyweight exercises into a high intensity, full body workout with minimal equipment. In the ladder-up, the suitcases serve to mimic the leg tuck, the jump-squats are a replication of the ball throw, and the 400m sprint acts to simulate the time and intensity of the sprint/drag/carry.

This week’s #HoyaHighlight follows Cadet Kyra Inston, a rising MS3 from George Washington University who studies psychol...
07/09/2020

This week’s #HoyaHighlight follows Cadet Kyra Inston, a rising MS3 from George Washington University who studies psychology and minors in criminal justice.

This summer, Cadet Inston is an intern for the Eurasia Center where she not only creates economic and environmental reports on Eurasian countries, but also compiles research on potential grants relating to women's issues in the region.

Inston says that she appreciates both the physical and mental challenge Army ROTC offers her. Upon graduation, she would like to branch reserve Medical Service Corps so that she could attend law school and work toward becoming a civil rights lawyer.

This Workout of the Week focuses on sprint training and is presented by Cadet Lauren Frasier. The purpose of this pyrami...
07/06/2020

This Workout of the Week focuses on sprint training and is presented by Cadet Lauren Frasier.

The purpose of this pyramid is to improve one's two-mile time and should aid with learning to keep pace as well as changing speeds between long and short distances. #HoyaHustle #PT

Happy Independence Day!
07/04/2020

Happy Independence Day!

Happy Independence Day 🎇 Today, we are celebrating 244 years of independence!

We would like to thank all the men and women in uniform who continue to fight for our freedom every day and give us the opportunity to celebrate our independence. 🇺🇸

Our future is in our own hands. It is in the choices we make, each and every day. Please remember your service and your safety is vital to ensuring that our nation's freedom endures for generations to come.

We hope you have a fun and safe holiday, and we ask you to please remember to practice social distancing.

...

📸 Kyle Crawford

#ArmyROTC | #LeadershipExcellence | #GoArmy | #MySquad | #DontBeAverage | #CallToServe | #4thOfJuly

1st Brigade Army ROTC - Spartans | 2nd "Freedom" Brigade Army ROTC | 3rd ROTC Brigade, The Black Hawk Brigade | 4th Brigade ROTC | 5th Brigade Army ROTC | 6th BDE Army ROTC | 7th Brigade ROTC | 8th Brigade Army ROTC | U.S. Army | GoArmy | U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command |

Today our #HoyaHighlight will spotlight Cadet Hazen Williams, another rising MS3 from Georgetown University who majors i...
07/02/2020

Today our #HoyaHighlight will spotlight Cadet Hazen Williams, another rising MS3 from Georgetown University who majors in regional and comparative studies with a security concentration in Southeast Asia.

This summer, Cadet Williams’ internship with the State Department in Jakarta was cancelled, but he still found a way to make a difference. Currently, Williams works as an intern with IDS International’s COVID Response Team. In his role, Williams facilitates the process of marketing training for contact tracers and access controls.

Williams says doing ROTC has made him into a better version of himself and when he graduates, he is interested in branching reserve Military Intelligence or Signal.

⁣This Workout of the Week is an endurance pyramid presented by Cadet Jacob Horwitz’s squad from GU.⠀The purpose of this ...
06/29/2020

⁣This Workout of the Week is an endurance pyramid presented by Cadet Jacob Horwitz’s squad from GU.⠀

The purpose of this set of exercises is to provide variety from traditional HIIT/cardio workouts and engage muscle groups sometimes overlooked in other routines.⠀
#HoyaHustle #PT

This week’s #HoyaHighlight is Cadet Dalton Nunamaker from Georgetown University, a rising MS3 studying government and ps...
06/25/2020

This week’s #HoyaHighlight is Cadet Dalton Nunamaker from Georgetown University, a rising MS3 studying government and psychology.

Cadet Nunamaker earned an internship with the Judge Advocate General's Corps this summer, but the program was cancelled due to COVID-19. However, this did not stop him from pursuing other opportunities. Nunamaker is currently a church camp counselor in Missouri where he teaches children. He hopes to see his internship rescheduled in the future.

Upon graduation, Cadet Nunamaker wishes to branch military intelligence or infantry and harbors an interest in attending law school to eventually join the Army JAG Corps. After serving in the Army, Cadet Nunamaker would like to work at a non-profit or engage in Christian ministry work.

⁣This Workout of the Week involves interval cardio training and is presented by Cadet Lilya Vanderaar. ⠀The purpose of t...
06/23/2020

⁣This Workout of the Week involves interval cardio training and is presented by Cadet Lilya Vanderaar.

The purpose of this set of exercises is to build the speed and endurance necessary to alternate pace during long runs.⠀
#HoyaHustle #PT

The Hoya Battalion is home to many cadets who strive to serve their communities and use the opportunities afforded to th...
06/18/2020

The Hoya Battalion is home to many cadets who strive to serve their communities and use the opportunities afforded to them to produce change. To showcase their efforts, we will be posting a #HoyaHighlight every week.

Our first highlight will be Cadet Nathan Keller, a rising MS3 from American University majoring in Arab World Studies. Cadet Keller is a volunteer with the Public Health Reserve Corps in Washington state. In his role, he serves to assist his county in providing transportation for mobility-disabled COVID positive or presumptive individuals who require transportation between treatment and isolation centers in the area.

Outside of volunteering with the COVID response force, Cadet Keller is attending a remote Arabic language program through Project Global Officer and one day wants to work as a Military Intelligence, Military Police, or Armor officer.

06/16/2020
U.S. Army Cadet Command (ROTC)

U.S. Army Cadet Command (ROTC)

Join Maj. Gen. John R. Evans, Jr., Commanding General, U.S. Army Cadet Command and Fort Knox and Command and Command Sgt. Maj. Tabitha A. Gavia, U.S. Army Recruiting Command at Fort Knox this Wednesday, 17 June at 6:00pm EST.

Post your questions here or tune-in live to join the discussion.

Physical fitness is key to leading a successful military career. To help stay motivated during the summer and continuall...
06/15/2020

Physical fitness is key to leading a successful military career. To help stay motivated during the summer and continually grow, we are introducing the Workout of the Week. This week’s set of exercises comes from Cadet Sofia Fagan of GW. Be sure to follow along each week to see new ways to improve your physical endurance!
#NeminiCedimus

This Friday we are excited to have our very own 2nd Lt. Anderson featured at the national Army ROTC commissioning ceremo...
06/09/2020

This Friday we are excited to have our very own 2nd Lt. Anderson featured at the national Army ROTC commissioning ceremony! #NeminiCedimus #HoyaBNAlumni

In anticipation of our upcoming #ArmyROTC National Commissioning Ceremony on Friday, we wanted to introduce you to some of the Cadets that will be featured during the event.

Cadet Anna-Elise M.K.E. Anderson of Georgetown University graduated with a Master of Arts in German & European Studies as well as a Graduate Certificate in Refugee and Humanitarian Emergencies.

Born in Heidelberg, Germany, Anderson grew up an Army brat in a bilingual household. Her father was an Army Chaplain, which will make Cadet Anderson a 4th generation commissioned officer in the U.S. military, as well as the first woman in her family to serve as an officer.

On wanting to serve in the Army, Anderson said, “I am a historian at heart. The Army and the military tradition are a world that spans thousands of years of human existence, and now I can claim a small piece of that tradition for my own. That’s incredible.”

Cadet Adam D. Rodriguez of Jacksonville State University graduated with a degree in Biology, with a concentration in ecology, and Military Science.

Having grown up in Decatur, Alabama, he joined #ArmyROTC to earn a unique skillset that would exemplify #LeadershipExcellence and to pursue scholarship opportunities, “I wanted to serve the country that has served me so well and become part of the strongest fighting force mankind has ever seen.”

Rodriguez was born with only one kidney, a condition that many said would prevent him from pursuing his goal to become an Army officer. Naturally, he accepted the challenge and not only overcame it, but will now be recognized on a nationwide stage for his achievements.

Though they are only a few of the thousands of brand new #ArmyROTCAlumni that have commissioned this spring, we believe the tireless effort and high-achieving spirits of Cadets Anderson and Rodriguez accurately represent all of our young men and women who have answered their nation’s #CallToServe.

Tune into the Army ROTC National Commissioning Ceremony right here, live from the Pentagon, on Friday, June 12 at 10:00 EST. https://www.facebook.com/ArmyROTC/posts/10158427012722250

U.S. Army Chaplain Corps | Jacksonville State University Army ROTC | The Hoya Battalion: Georgetown Army ROTC | 1st Brigade Army ROTC - Spartans | 2nd "Freedom" Brigade Army ROTC | 3rd ROTC Brigade, The Black Hawk Brigade | 4th Brigade ROTC | 5th Brigade Army ROTC | 6th BDE Army ROTC | 7th Brigade ROTC | 8th Brigade Army ROTC | U.S. Army | GoArmy | U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command | The Hoya | The Chanticleer

Address

3520 Prospect St NW, Ste 305
Washington D.C., DC
20057

Closest Metro Stop: Foggy Bottom (1.3 miles/27 minutes) Closest Bus Stop: G2 on Prospect Street

General information

The Hoya Battalion, Georgetown University’s Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Program, is steeped in a rich and enviable history that dates back to the birth of both the University and the United States of America.[1] Although the first Corps of Cadets is believed to have officially begun in the 1830’s, the cadets’ soldierly spirit was evident as early as 1789. From the beginning, Georgetown students have exhibited such esteemed leadership traits as discipline, selfless service, good citizenship, personal pride, courage, and military bearing. These characteristics complemented the Jesuit tradition of military virtue that began with the Society’s founder, Ignatius of Loyola. Even George Washington, that great citizen, soldier, and father of our nation, admired the military quality of Georgetown’s sons.[2] While parading through George Town in 1796, Washington stopped to admire the College boys, “…all formed in a line on the north side of the street (Water Street). They were dressed in uniforms consisting in part of blue coats and red waist-coats and presented a fine appearance. They seemed to attract the attention of the general very much.”[3] Washington was received a few weeks later at Georgetown’s campus when he came to visit two of his nephews. He reviewed the boys and their uniforms a bit more closely this time. Afterwards, he addressed the assembled crowd in Old North and began a tradition of Presidential visits to campus which is carried on today. Even though they were not called cadets, Georgetown’s earliest students looked like cadets and behaved like cadets. They were proud of America’s successful revolution and excited for their new nation and its leaders. Perhaps the most entertaining anecdote surrounds the visit of the French General Marquis de Lafayette to Washington, D.C. in mid-October 1824. Lafayette famously aided Washington and the colonials in the fight for independence. When he returned to visit the new capital, the citizenry prepared a parade and gave Georgetown the place of honor. Dr. DeLoughery of the class of 1826 wrote the best recollection of the story shortly before he died. He said, … I cannot close these remarks without relating an event which occurred during the visit of General Lafayette to Washington. There was to be a reception at the Capitol, and the boys were to take part in the procession. As Georgetown College was the oldest institution of learning in the District we were assigned the precedence in the ranks. Now there was also the Columbian College (present-day George Washington University), and belonging to it were more large boys or young men, than we could boast of, although the number of students by no means equaled ours. Columbian thought that it should be placed first, and not being able to persuade the marshal to yield to its wishes, determined to occupy the first place by main force. So no sooner was the order given to advance than a party of the Columbian boys, bearing a beautiful flag, the gift of the ladies of Washington, rushed forward to pass us, and they did so, placed the star that surmounted their banner beneath our little flag and cut it completely from its staff. In an instant a number of our larger boys, seeing what had been done made a spring at their banner, and tore it down and bore it off. I remember distinctly that the star fell near me, and that I crushed it under my feet. Order was soon restored, we took our places, and the Columbian boys, I believe, returned. Some three days later, Lafayette was to be received by the citizens of Georgetown, and of course a visit to the college was a part of the program. On this occasion we marched down Bridge Street to the stream which separates Georgetown from Washington, and there met him. On our return what was our surprise at seeing our lost flag floating on a little two-story frame building. At once a number of the boys made a rush for it, obtained it, and bore it aloft in triumph to the college. In commemoration of these events we had a banner painted by an artist named Simpson, representing on one side an eagle holding in its beak a streamer on which was inscribed the motto, "Nemini Cedimus;" on the reverse side the coat of arms of the college was placed. What trophies we had carried off from our opponents were afterwards restored. In conversation with Father Curley, I think he told me he had seen our banner or heard it spoken of when he entered the college some two years after. What has become of it I know not, but if there should be any record of the origin of the motto it will now be evident.[4] The Latin phrase nemini cedimus translates to mean, “Yield to no one.” It is a motto as appropriate for cadet use today as it was in 1824. On January 6, 1831, the College’s young students displayed their proficiency in military drill for President Andrew Jackson. They marched in formation from George Town to the White House in splendid uniforms. They paraded for the President, whose nephew was enrolled at the college, and attended an address. Jackson “…praised their modesty, discipline, and studious character; then he exhorted them not in future life to disappoint the hopes entertained in regard to them by their professors and their country.”[5] The President received them in the White House’s Eastern room. Thereafter they marched to the Capital, visited the dome, and began the return route to the College. “Their number, drill, and conduct excit(ed) favorable notice in the city.”[6] Later, Georgetown cadets would parade and drill for both Presidents Buchanan and Andrew Johnson.[7] Five years later some Georgetown students began to call themselves cadets. One student, Robert Alymer of Petersburg, Virginia, wrote home to his parents: The boys are at present organizing a company which is to be called the College Cadets; the uniform is the same as the College uniform, with the exception of a red sash, the pantaloons to be trimmed with a red braid, and a star on the left breast. We have spears in the place of guns. Our captain is one of the boys who was here the year before last and has just returned from fighting the Indians in Florida.[8] It is likely that two of the original members of this group were Lewis A. Armistead and Henry Heth. Both Armistead and Heth graduated from Georgetown in the class of 1837. Heth was the valedictorian, and he took a commission in the Army soon after he left the College. Eventually, he became a Major General in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. He led a division of A.P. Hill’s Corps at Gettysburg, where he was wounded on the battlefield. Armistead may even have been the first captain of the College Cadets. He had been a cadet at West Point, but was asked to leave after he broke a plate over Jubal Early’s head one day in the mess hall. He ended up at Georgetown, where his experience at the U.S. Military Academy would have been essential to the creation of a newborn cadet company. In addition, Robert Alymer wrote that the first captain had fought the Indians in Florida. Armistead was known to have served in the Seminole War during the same time period.[9] Later, Armistead would serve with great distinction as a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. The Georgetown College Cadets, who had been organized in 1836, do not appear to have kept records until 1851. One year later, the cadets wrote a constitution that imposed a strict code of conduct upon its members.[10] Although the College retained some ultimate level of administrative control, the cadets governed and policed themselves. They imposed fines upon peers who, among many other things, spoke out of turn at meetings, disobeyed a superior, or handled a weapon improperly. The constitution even outlined procedures for the care of cadet rifles. In fact, the corps’ first allotment of rifles became a major issue, as the government was not in the habit of giving weapons to civilian college boys. Reverend James Clark, who had graduated from West Point in 1829, was able to secure rifles for a cadet armory. But in order to do so, the College Cadets had to become a volunteer militia.[11] So on the 13th of June, 1838, the Secretary of War approved "Regulations for the issue of arms to the Militia of the District of Columbia."[12] Thus, Georgetown’s corps of cadets became the oldest military unit in D.C.[13] The cadets adopted a new uniform this year. The standard college uniform consisted of black jacket with dark blue pants and a black vest. During the summer, the college students wore the same jacket with white pants and a white vest. The College Cadets adjusted this uniform only slightly, adding gold braid along the pant leg and a military cap.[14] Unfortunately, the cadets would soon be faced with another change in uniform. They would choose between the Union blue and the Confederate gray. As the Civil War approached, the nation’s boiling emotions affected the campus dearly. Georgetown, located in the Federal capital, was attended mostly by southern students and this sometimes caused tension. In 1861 a U.S. Army engineer visited the College to survey the area from the school's lofty windows. A Georgetown graduate accompanied Captain E. F. Prime but this did not ensure a warm welcome. The Southern students surrounded their horses and lined the road to the school building. As the officer rode between the ranks, a tall Texan youth stepped to the front, waved his cap in the air, and yelled, "Three cheers for Jeff Davis and the Southern Confederacy!" The lines responded with a deafening roar. Captain Prime gracefully smiled and exclaimed, "Hurrah! Boys, Hurrah! I was once a boy myself."[15] But Georgetown's involvement in the Civil War was far more serious than this anecdote reveals. The war divided the student body and pitted brother against brother. Approximately 1100 students and faculty fought, 200 for the Union and 900 for the Confederacy. 358 Georgetown cadets are included in this number. A few were veterans of the Seminole War who knew the horrors of combat. Many were college freshmen with no military training other than the year they had spent as a member of the College Cadets. Some of our cadets who fought in the Civil War were the youngest soldiers to see combat in Hoya Battalion history. Sadly, 117 cadets died during the conflict. Cadet John Dooley answered the Confederacy's call to arms and enlisted. A native of Virginia, Dooley fought until he was captured during Pickett's charge at Gettysburg. He spent the rest of the war in a Union prison. Following the peace at Appomattox, Dooley returned to Georgetown and studied to become a Jesuit.[16] After the war, most students returned to the hilltop to meet again with former classmates who had since become former enemies. Georgetown started the slow process of rebuilding a community that had straddled the battle lines and been torn bitterly in half by war. They began by designating the school's colors blue and gray in commemoration of the service given by her sons to their respective states. Many other Georgetown traditions stem from this period in our nation's history. The cadets returned to a regular schedule of parades and reviews, as well as sharpshooting and drill competitions. Yearly events were held either on Thanksgiving or May Day. But enthusiasm for military service had dwindled because the horrible memory of the war lingered. One student recalled that, "drill was not very popular, for there was no great military spirit among the boys."[17] Altogether less than ten percent of the student body participated and college authorities had begun to relax their support for the corps. The unit lost cohesion when Ulysses S. Grant became President in 1869 and again when General George Tecumseh Sherman spoke at the commencement exercises in 1871. The cadet corps was still composed of a predominance of southern students, and they were understandably reluctant to kowtow to the conqueror of Lee or the man who burned through the south to the sea.[18] The cadet organization gradually disintegrated, although over the next two decades it would experience several attempted (yet ineffective) revivals. The Georgetown cadet corps does not return to earlier levels of strength and coordination until the late 1880's. The cadets ran a competitive drill and a formal military banquet in these years. They formed as the honor guard in the college's centennial exercises in 1889. But the program was still student-run. If a cadet desired to become an officer, they had to matriculate to West Point or attend an Officer Candidate's School at Fort Myer. World War I would change everything. The turmoil in Europe worried Georgetown students such that the University President, W. Coleman Nevils, S.J. was forced to ask the War Department to establish a Students' Army Training Corps on the hilltop. However Nevils, not wanting to wait on the government, allowed the expansion of the cadet corps. On 18 December 1918, after two years of petitioning, his request was approved and the Reserve Officers' Training Corps officially came to Georgetown.[19] The first unit was designated an Infantry Unit Senior Division, which meant that cadets commissioned from Georgetown could only enter the Infantry. Later, a Medical Corps and a Naval ROTC would be organized. Over two thousand Georgetown men served in the First World War. It is uncertain how many of them had been cadets, but many certainly were. Among the group were many distinguished soldiers, including Denis R. Dowd, the first American to die in World War I.[20] During the inter-bellum period, the cadets returned to the same schedule of training and drill that it had after the Civil War. It celebrated an annual Military Day on May 1, similar to the earlier May Day events. The Infantry Unit competed in many competitions and did quite well. In 1923 and 1940 their Rifle Team won the National Intercollegiate Championship, and between 1925 and 1927 they were twice named one of ROTC's distinguished units.[21] As the Second World War approached, it became clear to the War Department that ROTC would not fulfill the national demand for officers. So in May 1943, the advanced course in ROTC was suspended and basic course graduates were immediately sent to OCS so they could be commissioned sooner. In fact, all University courses were suspended during the war, so that the Georgetown campus could become a center for Army specialized training. Thousands of soldier trainees received instruction at Georgetown before heading off to fight.[22] WWII, more than any other war, took the highest toll on Georgetown's ranks. 171 were lost, including John Paul Beall and Al Blozis. Beall was the honor graduate of the Infantry ROTC in 1941. He became a Captain, the youngest Company Commander in the 9th Division. He participated in the U.S. coastal invasion of Algeria and was killed in action in Tunisia, 25 April 1943. Blozis was, until the 1980's, Georgetown's most famous athlete. He held the world record in the shotput and other field events, and had led the Hoya football team to national prominence.[23] He was commissioned at Fort Benning's OCS and was sent to lead patrols along the enemy lines in the snowy Vosges mountains above Colmar, France. On his very first day, Blozis set out alone in a snowstorm to find two of his soldiers that had been separated from the unit during a firefight earlier that day. He never returned.[24] Georgetown's weary recovery from war brought major reorganization to ROTC. The newly organized Department of Defense opened an Air Force program at Georgetown. At some point the Naval ROTC moved to GWU, and in 1950 Air Force relocated to the University of Maryland.[25] The various branches at the Pentagon realized that they should consolidate their D.C. area ROTC programs to minimize operating costs. In 1964, the District's colleges facilitated this effort when they founded the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. The Consortium's mission was and is to support cooperative endeavors no single institution could accomplish by itself. It remains central to the Hoya Battalion's efforts because it allows students at other schools to enroll in Army ROTC at Georgetown.[26] Since 1964, the Hoya Battalion has welcomed distinguished cadets from The American University, The Catholic University of America, The George Washington University, Marymount University, and the University of Maryland. These schools and their students have become essential members of the Hoya Battalion community. During the Korean War the Hoya Battalion lost one of its shining stars. Harry W. Spraker, Jr. had been the Cadet Lieutenant Colonel in command of the corps at Georgetown before he graduated in 1950. He was commissioned and sent to the front lines of the United Nations police action in Korea. He earned the Bronze Star and Silver Star before being killed in action at Cnonchog on 4 February 1951. After his death, the cadets at Georgetown decided to name the rifle drill team after him. The Spraker Rifles, as they are now known, have competed all across the United States in challenging drill competitions. For many years, they sponsored and managed the United States High School Rifle Drill Championship and on a few occasions they won prestigious trophies. But most importantly, the Spraker Rifles became a vibrant co-ed social organization that brought many students and cadets closer together outside of class. It has been the closest to a fraternity or sorority that the Hoya Battalion has known, and many of the friendships made in the Spraker Rifles have lasted for decades. But despite their dedication and hours of practice, the Spraker Rifles occasionally made mistakes. On 11 October, 1962, Hollywood's latest military film, "The Longest Day," made its premiere at Washington's Ontario Theater. The red carpet debut brought out celebrities and politicians, and the Spraker Rifles were invited to perform. As women screamed when actor and song-writer Paul Anka and actor Henry Fonda arrived, Georgetown ROTC cadets prepared to honor the event's attendees. They fired three volleys before they fixed their bayonets and began to pace the entrance to the theater. The unit's captain halted the group and put them through the manual of arms, impressing the audience. United States Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, the famous brother of a very famous president, was accompanied by his wife as they began to walk towards the performance. Cadet Sergeant Gerard Gallagher accidentally stabbed Kennedy's arm with a bayonet when the couple stepped on the carpet. Gallagher's face went pale as he said to his teammates, "I got one." Kennedy needed no medical attention but Gallagher was shaken by the experience nonetheless. He confided to another cadet later, "He just turned around and looked at me kind of curiously, rubbed his arm and walk(ed) on."[27] The embarrassing episode made the front page of the Washington Post the next morning. During the sixties and seventies, the Vietnam War marked a turning point in the Army ROTC program at Georgetown. The anti-war and pacifist spirit had reached the D.C. University campuses and caused many students and faculty to revolt against University support for the program. In 1968, a group of students hired an airplane to shower the University graduation audience with leaflets protesting the war and pointing out that the audience could have been Vietnamese civilians showered with napalm. This stirred many to ponder ROTC's role in college. Many students began to question the close relationship that the University and the Army had enjoyed, asking whether or not it was immoral for a religiously minded school to give credit for military training.[28] In 1969, the ROTC issue began to divide Georgetown's campus. An organization of 50 students occupied the ROTC offices during a three-hour-long sit-in. These non-violent protestors handed out anti-ROTC paraphernalia and showed films in the hallway outside the suite of offices on the second floor of the Old North building. About 59 cadets were on ROTC scholarships at the time, and they joined with sympathetic students in forming a Committee to Defend ROTC. A student referendum showed that about 68% of students wanted ROTC to remain on campus. But some student publications, like The Hoya, cried out against ROTC because they saw it as compromising the University's neutrality and religious foundation. In 1970 some students and faculty disrupted ROTC classes so much that they were cancelled, and after harsh debate, Georgetown discontinued academic credit for the courses.[29] Three years later, the issue was raised again when the School of Foreign Service proposed making ROTC its own academic department and giving its students limited academic credit. It seemed the university was ready to accredit ROTC because it feared losing an estimated $500,000 in federal scholarships and grants. Several opponents, especially Fr. Richard McSorley and Fr. Jerry Hall, S.J., framed their argument in strictly moral terms. McSorley said, "I am opposed to the destruction of life. I'm opposed to educators using their facilities to promote that." Hall alleged, "The ROTC is not here to teach or train officers, they are here to make militarism more acceptable."[30] These two Jesuits and a student named John Lyddy led a week-long hunger strike to draw attention to the decision. Colonel Albert Loy, who was then the Professor of Military Science, felt that protestors were taking the issue "out of context" and emphasized that ROTC courses met every academic standard and therefore deserved credit. Air Force ROTC Captain Herman Few restated Loy's views, "The only issue is whether we should get credit. The moral issue belongs to the individual to decide on his own."[31] The proposal was at first turned down, but it was accepted a few years later when Georgetown President Fr. Robert J. Henle, S.J. approved 6 credits for cadets in their senior year and organized ROTC as its own academic department. But a rift between ROTC and the University was nonetheless apparent, as the unit gradually saw its offices move further from the center of campus. Although the seventies were a trying time for the Hoya Battalion, the years following 1972 brought the invaluable addition of female leadership to Georgetown's cadet corps. Heretofore women were not eligible for entry into ROTC and female commissioned officers were quite rare. Ladies jumped at the opportunities that had previously been reserved only for male cadets, and took full advantage of ROTC benefits. Female participation in ROTC constituted roughly 20% of all cadets in the program during this decade. Christine Vaishvila was one of the Hoya Battalion's first female cadets to graduate from the U.S. Army's Airborne School. She was determined to overcome the Army's challenges, remarking, "In the military, women have twice the amount of pressure to perform and really do their best."[32] From the start, a female cadet's commitment to the defense of the nation has shown no difference from that of any other cadet. When asked about the possibility of going to war, cadet Lizanne Siccardi commented, "I know I'd be scared to death. Anybody would. But if I had to, I'd go. Freedom of thought and expression, my family and my lifestyle – they all mean a lot to me. I'd be willing to fight for them if I had to."[33] Female cadets have lent strong leadership to the cadet corps, as several have commanded the Hoya Battalion. In the last two decades, ROTC has grown tremendously. It has become increasingly more formalized while it forged leadership for an Army made up entirely of volunteers. It has consistently placed among the top 100 Army ROTC units in the country, as its cadets lead the way in national evaluation. Indeed, the Hoya Battalion added two more national championships to its trophy case when it won the AUSA Army Ten-Miler running race in 1998 and 2000. The Hoya Battalion remains one of the nation's oldest sources of commissioned officers and can claim a tradition as proud as that of any military academy. It has commissioned over 4,000 men and women since 1918, and many other former Georgetown cadets led soldiers in battle before that. Its history is linked tightly to the heart of our nation, Washington D.C., and mirrors the growth of the country itself. But most of all, the Hoya Battalion has been and will be all that its cadets contribute to it. If the past is at all indicative of the future, Hoya Battalion cadets will continue to figure prominently in University life, the defense of Constitution, and their personal successes. Alec D. Barker Washington, DC, 2001

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