NASA Office of Inspector General

NASA Office of Inspector General If you're looking for the official source of information about the NASA Office of Inspector General, please visit our homepage at http://oig.nasa.gov

To report fraud, theft, and misconduct call 1-800-424-9183 or visit http://oig.nasa.gov/

Operating as usual

11/17/2021
oig.nasa.gov

We identified 8 top challenges facing NASA in 2021 including returning humans to the Moon, sustaining a human presence in low Earth orbit, outdated infrastructure, and impacts from COVID-19. Our infographic talks about these and more.https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC-2021-Infographic.pdf

11/16/2021

The Office of Inspector General contracted with the independent public accounting firm Ernst & Young LLP (EY) to audit NASA’s fiscal year (FY) 2021 financial statements. This audit resulted in NASA’s 11th consecutive “clean” or unmodified opinion on the Agency’s financial statements. https://www.nasa.gov/content/agency-financial-reports

In our annual report, we identify the eight top management challenges facing NASA.Report: https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC-2...
11/15/2021

In our annual report, we identify the eight top management challenges facing NASA.
Report:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC-2021.pdf

In our annual report, we identify the eight top management challenges facing NASA.
Report:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC-2021.pdf

11/15/2021
oig.nasa.gov

In its effort to return humans to the Moon, NASA is likely to spend $93 billion on its Artemis program from FY 2012 through FY 2025. Considering the cost-per-launch for each of the first four Artemis missions will exceed $4 billion, it is vital the Agency identify strategies to reduce costs to make the program more sustainable. We discuss this and more in our latest audit report:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-22-003.pdf

11/09/2021
oig.nasa.gov

Today, NASA OIG released its fiscal year 2021 evaluation of NASA’s information security program. As required by the Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014, we conduct these reviews of the Agency’s information security program every year and report the results to OMB. Read more:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/ML-22-001.pdf

11/08/2021
oig.nasa.gov

The Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014 (DATA Act) requires agencies like NASA to submit financial and award data to Treasury for publication on USAspending.gov, a publicly available government website that tracks federal spending. In our third and final required DATA Act audit, we assessed NASA’s fiscal year 2020, fourth quarter data submission to Treasury, totaling nearly $5.6 billion, and found that it scored a quality rating of ‘Excellent.’https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-22-002.pdf

Our new audit will assess NASA’s progress in upgrading its Near Space and Deep Space Network ground stations, which it u...
10/20/2021

Our new audit will assess NASA’s progress in upgrading its Near Space and Deep Space Network ground stations, which it uses to communicate with spacecraft in low Earth orbit and throughout the solar system.

Our new audit will assess NASA’s progress in upgrading its Near Space and Deep Space Network ground stations, which it uses to communicate with spacecraft in low Earth orbit and throughout the solar system.

We’re kicking off a new audit today examining NASA’s efforts to advance diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility ...
10/05/2021

We’re kicking off a new audit today examining NASA’s efforts to advance diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility (DEIA). In the course of our audit, we’ll assess how the Agency is implementing DEIA policies and procedures and evaluate whether the Agency is collecting the kind of data it needs to monitor its efforts.

We’re kicking off a new audit today examining NASA’s efforts to advance diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility (DEIA). In the course of our audit, we’ll assess how the Agency is implementing DEIA policies and procedures and evaluate whether the Agency is collecting the kind of data it needs to monitor its efforts.

Shown here, engineers at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) inspect a component of NASA’s Europa Clipper tha...
09/30/2021

Shown here, engineers at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) inspect a component of NASA’s Europa Clipper that will ship to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 2022 for assembly, test, and eventual launch. The Clipper is just one of many missions NASA has in development with APL. That’s why we initiated a new audit today assessing whether NASA is effectively managing the APL portfolio.

Shown here, engineers at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) inspect a component of NASA’s Europa Clipper that will ship to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 2022 for assembly, test, and eventual launch. The Clipper is just one of many missions NASA has in development with APL. That’s why we initiated a new audit today assessing whether NASA is effectively managing the APL portfolio.

09/08/2021
oig.nasa.gov

Launch complexes, wind tunnels, test stands, and laboratories are key assets needed to explore the Moon and Mars, conduct aeronautics research, and study the Earth and its changing climate. With more than 5,000 buildings and structures, a $2.66 billion deferred maintenance backlog, and $357 million facility construction budget, learn in our new report whether NASA’s efforts to modernize, consolidate, and repair infrastructure are meeting mission needs.https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-027.pdf

08/26/2021

NASA is developing two mobile launchers that will be used to assemble, process, transport, and launch the SLS heavy-lift rocket and Orion crew capsule for Artemis missions. Currently under development, the second of these launchers will be used beginning with the Artemis IV mission for future, larger variants of the SLS. Our newest audit will examine the extent to which NASA is meeting its costs, schedule, and performance goals for the second mobile launcher contract.

08/10/2021
oig.nasa.gov

Multiple challenges to NASA’s development of next-generation spacesuits preclude the goal of a 2024 Moon landing. They’re also costly. So far, NASA has spent $420 million developing next-generation spacesuits, but still doesn’t have a flight-ready suit for exploration missions, including Artemis. The Agency plans to invest $625 million more, bringing the total to over $1 billion through 2025 when the first two flight-ready next spacesuits are expected. Read our audit to find out how NASA is addressing the cost, schedule, and performance of the next generation spacesuit system. https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-025.pdf

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, passed in March 2020, provided NASA with $60 million for...
08/09/2021
NASA OIG

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, passed in March 2020, provided NASA with $60 million for coronavirus response. We found the Agency appropriately managed those funds to meet congressional mandates as well as federal and Agency guidance. Learn more here:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-024.pdf

#NASA uses a fleet of rockets to launch science, technology, and astronauts into space. Check out our new infographic fo...
07/29/2021

#NASA uses a fleet of rockets to launch science, technology, and astronauts into space. Check out our new infographic for more on the Agency’s U.S. launch vehicle fleet.https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/NASALaunchVehiclesInfographic.pdf

#NASA uses a fleet of rockets to launch science, technology, and astronauts into space. Check out our new infographic for more on the Agency’s U.S. launch vehicle fleet.https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/NASALaunchVehiclesInfographic.pdf

07/14/2021
oig.nasa.gov

There are contracts, grants…and something you might not know much about: cooperative agreements. Federal agencies like NASA use these types of awards to provide financial assistance to organizations like Universities Space Research Association, or USRA for short. USRA ranks among the top five recipients of awards NASA makes to educational and nonprofit entities each year. In this audit, we evaluated how the Agency managed 21 agreements it had with USRA from fiscal year 2017 to April 2020 valued at approximately $476 million. The result of our work yielded 12 recommendations to increase accountability over NASA awards. Read to find out more.https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-022.pdf

Episode 5 of #CIGIE's 10 Question Tuesday features #NASAOIG's very own Mona Mann, where she discusses topics ranging fro...
06/17/2021
10 Question Tuesday Episode 5

Episode 5 of #CIGIE's 10 Question Tuesday features #NASAOIG's very own Mona Mann, where she discusses topics ranging from her professional life to her personal South Asian heritage. Learn more at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tr4EbiZ4YS0

From space junk to great book recommendations to managing your career. Oh, and probably the most amazing grandma you'd ever want to meet. This one has it a...

06/03/2021

Have you been impacted by a hurricane, forest fire, or tornado? Our newest audit will examine the NASA Earth Science Disasters Program’s ability to provide information to communities and government agencies to help them predict, prepare for, and recover from these and other disasters.

Our role in providing #GovernmentOversight at #NASA includes issuing Semiannual Reports to Congress highlighting our pas...
05/28/2021

Our role in providing #GovernmentOversight at #NASA includes issuing Semiannual Reports to Congress highlighting our past 6 months of oversight activities. From October 2020 to March 2021, we released 14 reports, opened 39 investigations, and questioned more than $17 million in costs—all during the height of the pandemic. Read the full report here:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/SAR-2021-SPRING.pdf

Our role in providing #GovernmentOversight at #NASA includes issuing Semiannual Reports to Congress highlighting our past 6 months of oversight activities. From October 2020 to March 2021, we released 14 reports, opened 39 investigations, and questioned more than $17 million in costs—all during the height of the pandemic. Read the full report here:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/SAR-2021-SPRING.pdf

05/21/2021
oig.nasa.gov

In the last four years, NASA experienced more than 6,000 cyber-attacks on its IT systems. See the NASA Office of Inspector General’s evaluation of the Agency’s cybersecurity readiness. See:
https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-019.pdf

05/21/2021
oig.nasa.gov

In FY 2020, the estimated amount of government-wide improper payments—payments the federal government should not have made or made in an incorrect amount—was $206.4 billion. Find out whether NASA had any programs susceptible to improper payments and if the Agency met the requirements of the Payment Integrity Information Act in our new report:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-020.pdf

Today, NASA OIG announced the start of its fiscal year 2021 evaluation of NASA’s information security program. The Feder...
04/29/2021
NASA OIG

Today, NASA OIG announced the start of its fiscal year 2021 evaluation of NASA’s information security program. The Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014 (FISMA, for short) requires us to conduct annual reviews of the Agency’s information security program and report the results to OMB. Check this space for updates or get smart now by checking out our past work on NASA’s information technology performance: https://go.nasa.gov/2PuCzme

04/19/2021
oig.nasa.gov

NASA plans to orbit the Moon—uncrewed in 2021 and crewed in 2023—culminating with landing astronauts on the lunar surface in late 2024. Learn more about the status and cost of these missions and other Artemis-related programs, including the SLS rocket, Orion capsule, Exploration Ground Systems, Gateway outpost, and Human Landing System, in our new report.

See:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-018.pdf

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03/31/2021
go.usa.gov

Read more from NASA OIG about the impact of COVID-19 and how 30 major programs and projects account for more than half of the estimated $3 billion total COVID impact reported by NASA.

See:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-016.pdf

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COVID-19 continues to have a significant cost and schedule impact on NASA’s major programs and projects – estimated at m...
03/31/2021

COVID-19 continues to have a significant cost and schedule impact on NASA’s major programs and projects – estimated at more than $3 billion over the next several years. This infographic presents a snapshot of the reported impacts to 30 of the Agency’s major programs and projects.

COVID-19 continues to have a significant cost and schedule impact on NASA’s major programs and projects – estimated at more than $3 billion over the next several years. This infographic presents a snapshot of the reported impacts to 30 of the Agency’s major programs and projects.

03/31/2021
go.usa.gov

NASA Exchange and Morale Support Activities operate cafeterias, gift shops, and recreation facilities at 12 NASA locations around the country. The NASA Office of Inspector General reviewed financial statement audit reports for the exchanges.

See: https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-017.pdf

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03/24/2021
oig.nasa.gov

As part of its annual FISMA work, the NASA Office of Inspector General examined a Contractor-Operated Communications System at Glenn Research Center and found that NASA failed to maintain required documentation. See: https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-015.pdf

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02/16/2021
oig.nasa.gov

As part of its annual FISMA work, the NASA Office of Inspector General examined an Agency-operated information system known as a Center Communications System (CCS), operated at Marshall Space Flight Center, and found that NASA had not taken corrective action to address information security control deficiencies in a timely manner.

See: https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-013.pdf

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02/08/2021
oig.nasa.gov

The NASA Office of Inspector General summarized NASA’s plans for the Artemis missions.

See:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/ArtemisInfographic.pdf

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01/27/2021
oig.nasa.gov

The NASA Office of Inspector General evaluated NASA’s efforts to mitigate the risks posed by orbital debris (space junk) as well as the Agency’s coordination efforts with international and commercial organizations to address the issue.
See: https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-011.pdf

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01/14/2021

Will NASA’s VIPER lunar rover stay on schedule and within budget for its planned 2023 mission to map water ice on the Moon’s South Pole? We’ll examine these and other questions in our next audit.

12/08/2020
oig.nasa.gov

In our second audit on the Artemis program, we look at NASA’s organizational, programmatic, and acquisition approaches to landing astronauts on the Moon by 2024. Meanwhile, check out our last audit on Artemis:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-004.pdf

12/03/2020
oig.nasa.gov

The NASA Office of Inspector General evaluated NASA’s processes and procedures regarding the acquisition, handling, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials.

See: https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-006.pdf

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The NASA Office of Inspector General issues its Semiannual Report to Congress highlighting OIG accomplishments during th...
11/30/2020

The NASA Office of Inspector General issues its Semiannual Report to Congress highlighting OIG accomplishments during the past 6 months

See:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/SAR-2020-FALL.pdf

11/17/2020
oig.nasa.gov

NASA received a “clean” audit opinion on the Agency’s fiscal year 2020 financial statement audit.https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-005.pdf

OIG identifies Top Management and Performance Challenges at NASA.Report: https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC-2020.pdfGraphic: h...
11/12/2020

OIG identifies Top Management and Performance Challenges at NASA.
Report:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC-2020.pdf
Graphic:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC2020graphic.pdf

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300 E St SW
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Welcome to the NASA Office of Inspector General (OIG) fan page on Facebook. We conduct objective and independent oversight of NASA programs and operations and report to the NASA Administrator, Congress, and the public to further the Agency’s accomplishment of its mission. On our page, you will find the most recent audits, investigative summaries, and other OIG products. If you're looking for the official source of information about the NASA OIG please visit our homepage at http://oig.nasa.gov/ We hope you'll become our fan on Facebook and then check out our official site. We want to hear what you have to say! We encourage you to share your comments, ideas, and concerns. All we ask is that you please keep your comments and wall posts clean and respectful. In addition to keeping things “G-Rated,” we ask that you follow our posting guidelines. We reserve the right to determine which comments are acceptable for this page. If you don't comply, we’ll remove your message: -We don’t allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any group. -We do not allow solicitations or advertisements for outside entities. This also applies to spam and chain-letters. -Comments that make unsupported accusations will be removed. We will not collect or retain these comments in our records, but this is a public forum and any information provided in comments may be publicly available on Facebook. Facebook’s privacy policies apply. As such, please do not post personal information you do not want available to the general public. You post at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Note that the appearance of external links on this page does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the NASA OIG. NASA OIG is not liable for any loss or damage resulting from any comments posted on this page. This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, complaint legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy. Our page is not the place to report violations of laws, rules, or regulations; misconduct; fraud; waste; abuse; or mismanagement. These concerns should be reported directly to our Hotline at 1-800-424-9183 or visit: http://oig.nasa.gov/cyberhotline.html

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We identified 8 top challenges facing NASA in 2021 including returning humans to the Moon, sustaining a human presence in low Earth orbit, outdated infrastructure, and impacts from COVID-19. Our infographic talks about these and more.https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC-2021-Infographic.pdf
The Office of Inspector General contracted with the independent public accounting firm Ernst & Young LLP (EY) to audit NASA’s fiscal year (FY) 2021 financial statements. This audit resulted in NASA’s 11th consecutive “clean” or unmodified opinion on the Agency’s financial statements. https://www.nasa.gov/content/agency-financial-reports
In our annual report, we identify the eight top management challenges facing NASA. Report:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/MC-2021.pdf
In its effort to return humans to the Moon, NASA is likely to spend $93 billion on its Artemis program from FY 2012 through FY 2025. Considering the cost-per-launch for each of the first four Artemis missions will exceed $4 billion, it is vital the Agency identify strategies to reduce costs to make the program more sustainable. We discuss this and more in our latest audit report:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-22-003.pdf
Today, NASA OIG released its fiscal year 2021 evaluation of NASA’s information security program. As required by the Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014, we conduct these reviews of the Agency’s information security program every year and report the results to OMB. Read more:https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/ML-22-001.pdf
The Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014 (DATA Act) requires agencies like NASA to submit financial and award data to Treasury for publication on USAspending.gov, a publicly available government website that tracks federal spending. In our third and final required DATA Act audit, we assessed NASA’s fiscal year 2020, fourth quarter data submission to Treasury, totaling nearly $5.6 billion, and found that it scored a quality rating of ‘Excellent.’https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-22-002.pdf
Our new audit will assess NASA’s progress in upgrading its Near Space and Deep Space Network ground stations, which it uses to communicate with spacecraft in low Earth orbit and throughout the solar system.
We’re kicking off a new audit today examining NASA’s efforts to advance diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility (DEIA). In the course of our audit, we’ll assess how the Agency is implementing DEIA policies and procedures and evaluate whether the Agency is collecting the kind of data it needs to monitor its efforts.
Shown here, engineers at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) inspect a component of NASA’s Europa Clipper that will ship to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 2022 for assembly, test, and eventual launch. The Clipper is just one of many missions NASA has in development with APL. That’s why we initiated a new audit today assessing whether NASA is effectively managing the APL portfolio.
Launch complexes, wind tunnels, test stands, and laboratories are key assets needed to explore the Moon and Mars, conduct aeronautics research, and study the Earth and its changing climate. With more than 5,000 buildings and structures, a $2.66 billion deferred maintenance backlog, and $357 million facility construction budget, learn in our new report whether NASA’s efforts to modernize, consolidate, and repair infrastructure are meeting mission needs.https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-027.pdf
NASA is developing two mobile launchers that will be used to assemble, process, transport, and launch the SLS heavy-lift rocket and Orion crew capsule for Artemis missions. Currently under development, the second of these launchers will be used beginning with the Artemis IV mission for future, larger variants of the SLS. Our newest audit will examine the extent to which NASA is meeting its costs, schedule, and performance goals for the second mobile launcher contract.
Multiple challenges to NASA’s development of next-generation spacesuits preclude the goal of a 2024 Moon landing. They’re also costly. So far, NASA has spent $420 million developing next-generation spacesuits, but still doesn’t have a flight-ready suit for exploration missions, including Artemis. The Agency plans to invest $625 million more, bringing the total to over $1 billion through 2025 when the first two flight-ready next spacesuits are expected. Read our audit to find out how NASA is addressing the cost, schedule, and performance of the next generation spacesuit system. https://oig.nasa.gov/docs/IG-21-025.pdf