Indian Arts and Crafts Board

Indian Arts and Crafts Board If you're looking for the official source of information about the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, please visit our homepage at: https://www.iacb.doi.gov/

The Indian Arts and Crafts Board, an agency located in the U.S. Department of the Interior, was created by Congress to promote the economic development of federally recognized American Indians and Alaska Natives through the expansion of the Indian arts and crafts market. A top priority of the IACB is the implementation and enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, a truth-in-advertising law that provides criminal and civil penalties for marketing products as "Indian-made" when such products are not made by Indians, as defined by the Act. The IACB's other activities include providing professional business advice, information on the Act and related marketing issues, fundraising assistance, and promotional opportunities to Native American artists, craftspeople, and cultural organizations of federally recognized Tribes. The IACB operates three regional museums, the Sioux Indian Museum, the Museum of the Plains Indian, and the Southern Plains Indian Museum. The IACB also produces a consumer directory of approximately 400 Native American owned and operated arts and crafts businesses. These activities are not duplicated in either the federal or private sector. The Indian Arts and Crafts Board is the only federal agency that is consistently and exclusively concerned with the economic benefits and cultural development of federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Natives. The IACB's policies are determined by five commissioners who are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior, and serve without compensation. The IACB's activities and programs are carried out by a professional, experienced staff.

Mission: The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB) promotes the economic development of American Indians and Alaska Natives of federally recognized Tribes through the expansion of the Indian arts and crafts market. The IACB provides promotional opportunities, general business advice, and information on the Indian Arts and Crafts Act to Native American artists, craftspeople, businesses, museums, and cultural centers of federally recognized Tribes. Additionally, the IACB operates three regional museums, conducts a promotional museum exhibition program, produces a "Source Directory of American Indian and Alaska Native Owned and Operated Arts and Crafts Businesses", and oversees the implementation of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act.

Operating as usual

The exhibition "An Interwoven Legacy: The Black Ash Basketry of Kelly Church and Cherish Parrish" runs December 5, 2020 ...
10/23/2020
An Interwoven Legacy: The Black Ash Basketry of Kelly Church and Cherish Parrish | Grand Rapids Art Museum

The exhibition "An Interwoven Legacy: The Black Ash Basketry of Kelly Church and Cherish Parrish" runs December 5, 2020 – March 27, 2021 at the Grand Rapids Art Museum. For details, please visit the webpage below.

https://www.artmuseumgr.org/2020/03/12/an-interwoven-legacy-the-black-ash-basketry-of-kelly-church-and-cherish-parrish/

An Interwoven Legacy: The Black Ash Basketry of Kelly Church and Cherish Parrish December 5, 2020 Become a member Kelly Church and Cherish Parrish come from an unbroken line of Black ash basket weavers, a traditional Anishinaabe art form that has been practiced for centuries, and the pair continue t...

Meet Nytom, the Makah Artist Showcased in this Year’s Annual National Congress of American Indians Convention & Marketpl...
10/22/2020
Meet the Artist Showcased in this Year’s Annual Convention & Marketplace | NCAI

Meet Nytom, the Makah Artist Showcased in this Year’s Annual National Congress of American Indians Convention & Marketplace. To learn more, please visit the webpage below.

http://www.ncai.org/news/articles/2020/10/21/meet-the-artist-showcased-in-this-year-s-annual-convention-marketplace

Published on Oct 21, 2020 Each year, the National Congress of American Indians selects an artist to represent the host region of the Annual Convention & Marketplace. This year, despite the pandemic, NCAI is showcasing the Northwest region and has selected Nytom (John Goodwin) of Sequim, Washington a...

10/22/2020
Behind the Mask: Indigenous Artists Speak Out | Heard Museum

The exhibition "Behind the Mask: Indigenous Artists Speak Out" is now open at the Heard. For more details, please visit the webpage below.

https://heard.org/exhibits/behind-the-mask/

Artists across the globe are responding to the COVID-19 pandemic in creative ways, through music, poetry, performance and a variety of art forms. The face masks worn to prevent spread of the virus present a blank canvas for artists seeking to bring attention to the devastating effects the virus has....

10/06/2020
Viewing Room - IACB Museums

The Sioux Indian Museum, Rapid City (SD), administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, presents its first online exhibit featuring Jerry Fogg.

This exhibit presents the complete catalog of Mr. Fogg’s work, including elements of previous exhibitions under the titles of 11 Degrees of Tatanka and Native Soul. 11 Degrees of Tatanka is a celebration of Yanktonia culture and was created by the artist to honor the bison. Painted buffalo skulls, buffalo hides, and other objects are used to depict traditional elements of Nakota culture, such as the sacred pipe ceremony, the story of White Buffalo Calf Woman, and star knowledge. Also included in the exhibit is a large selection of Mr. Fogg’s mixed media work. As a mixed media artist, Mr. Fogg uses traditional and contemporary materials in his work, blending the stories of those who came before him with his own.

http://iacbmuseums-viewingroom.exhibit-e.art/viewing-room

The Virtual Southeastern Art Show and Market (SEASAM) opens October 2 through December 31. Please visit the webpage belo...
10/01/2020
Page Not Found | SEASAM

The Virtual Southeastern Art Show and Market (SEASAM) opens October 2 through December 31. Please visit the webpage below for more details.

https://www.seasam.net/

SEASAM provides an outstanding marketplace where adult and youth artists can flourish.

Don't forget, but "Larger Than Memory" continues through January 3, 2021 at the Heard Museum. More details on the webpag...
09/29/2020
Larger Than Memory: Contemporary Art from Indigenous North America at the Heard Museum

Don't forget, but "Larger Than Memory" continues through January 3, 2021 at the Heard Museum. More details on the webpage below.

https://heard.org/larger-than-memory/

Indian Country Today: Larger Than Memory is larger than life at Phoenix museum Sep 15, 2020By Sandra Hale Schulman After months of being closed due to the pandemic, the Heard Museum has reopened in a big way with its largest exhibition of contemporary Indigenous art in the museum’s 90-year history...

"Weaving History into Art: The Enduring Legacy of Shan Goshorn" opens October 9, 2020 and runs through March 28, 2021 at...
09/24/2020
Weaving History into Art: The Enduring Legacy of Shan Goshorn - Gilcrease Museum

"Weaving History into Art: The Enduring Legacy of Shan Goshorn" opens October 9, 2020 and runs through March 28, 2021 at the Gilcrease Museum. For more information, please visit the webpage below.

https://gilcrease.org/exhibitions/weaving-history-into-art-the-enduring-legacy-of-shan-goshorn/#:~:text=Through%20Goshorn's%20hand%2Dwoven%20basketry,non%2Dthreatening%20experience%20that%20promotes

There’s something about having a message in the vessel shape that makes people really curious … really engages them. They literally lean forward and look in and want to know more about it. It’s the perfect springboard for honest dialogue. I’ve never seen anything like it. Shan Goshorn Weavin...

On Monday, October 5, Amber DuBoise-Shepherd presents a free virtual talk about her artistic practice, as a Prairie Band...
09/18/2020
Art Discussion with Amber DuBoise-Shepherd

On Monday, October 5, Amber DuBoise-Shepherd presents a free virtual talk about her artistic practice, as a Prairie Band Potawatomi/Sac & Fox/Navajo painter and museum educator based in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Visit the webpage below to register.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeGNpt_BIH3pP33KbZbj09MxEWj_2uuXZ7NNc4j57rauZZx0w/viewform

Monday, October 5, Amber DuBoise-Shepherd presents about her artistic practice, as a Prairie Band Potawatomi/Sac & Fox/Navajo painter and museum educator based in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Register to participate in this discussion in conjunction with "Azhwakwa: Contemporary Anishinaabe Art" at the Jacobso...

INTO THE SPIRIT Virtual Arts Market is live now through October 17. Check out these amazing artists below.   https://www...
09/15/2020
IN THE SPIRIT Northwest Native Festival

INTO THE SPIRIT Virtual Arts Market is live now through October 17. Check out these amazing artists below.

https://www.inthespiritarts.org/vendors

Browse the Virtual Arts Market, and support Native creatives! Frank Andrews Charles W Bloomfield Jason Reed Brown Suzanne Lynn Cross Jacinthe Demmert Sam Dimmick Denise Emerson Sean Gallager Lily Hope Mary Kelsay Khu.éex’ Linley B Logan Cynthia Masterson Alexander McCarty Lillian Pitt Michelle Pr...

09/02/2020
www.narf.org

Webinars on Indigenous Peoples, Intellectual Property for Indigenous Leaders, Lawyers and Community Members hosted by the World Intellectual Property Organization and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to be held September 10 and September 24, 2020 at 9-11 A.M. Mountain Time Zone.

Please refer to the PDF below for more details:

https://www.narf.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/20200910indigenous-ip-flyer.pdf

In collaboration with First American Art Magazine, tonight Gordon Coons will speak about his artistic practice through a...
08/31/2020
Gordon Coons Artist Talk

In collaboration with First American Art Magazine, tonight Gordon Coons will speak about his artistic practice through a free virtual lecture. To register, please visit the page below.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScvK34ArS_pZ4wX7MNiZ0XuYFP4eCRO2fT4Ep0UATPG5eIFug/viewform

Monday, August 31, Gordon Coons presents about his artistic practice as an Ojibwe/Ottawa painter, printmaker, and fumage artist based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Register to participate in this discussion in conjunction with "Azhwakwa: Contemporary Anishinaabe Art" at the Jacobson House Native Art Ce...

New Mexico Business Owners Sentenced for Violations of the Indian Arts and Crafts Acthttps://www.justice.gov/usao-nm/pr/...
08/31/2020
Purveyors of fraudulent Native American-style goods and products sentenced in federal court

New Mexico Business Owners Sentenced for Violations of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act

https://www.justice.gov/usao-nm/pr/purveyors-fraudulent-native-american-style-goods-and-products-sentenced-federal-court

Department of Justice U.S. Attorney’s Office District of New Mexico FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, August 27, 2020 Purveyors of fraudulent Native American-style goods and products sentenced in federal court ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Jawad Khalaf, 72, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, Nashat Khalaf, 73, of ...

These colorfully quilled and beaded men’s Sioux moccasins were produced by an unknown female artist, possibly Lakota, ca...
08/31/2020

These colorfully quilled and beaded men’s Sioux moccasins were produced by an unknown female artist, possibly Lakota, ca. 1900-1920. They were originally manufactured of buckskin, and feature glass seed beads, silk, and an intricately quilled multi-colored solar design. The moccasins were gifted to the Sioux Indian Museum by Mr. J. P. Roberts in 1967 (cat. # R.69.2.22 a-b).
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The beads sewn along the bottom edge of the moccasins were not only decorative, but also served to protect the quillwork from breakage, fraying, or getting caught in the grass. According to Dakota scholar Ella Deloria, within Sioux traditions the art of quillwork originated with the spirit Two-Woman, who selected only certain women to learn this art form. “They were marked women. Thus, quillwork was not learned from a human teacher, by practice, trial and error till perfection was achieved. [Instead] it came suddenly, and the worker’s first piece was as perfect as her last – because she had supernatural help…Those who were outstanding quill workers belonged to a…guild, and their aim was to scorn copy[ing].”
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In Lakota philosophy, all life power comes from the sun, and like a vein it represents the flow of lifeblood from the sun to earth. The sun was a manifestation of Wakan Tanka (The Creator) and objects like these expressed connections between the physical and sacred world. For the artisan, the act of creation was an act of communion with higher powers.
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To learn more please visit: www.doi.gov/iacb/TreasuresMoccasins
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#lakota #sun #moccasins #buckskin #beadwork #sioux #spirits #elladeloria #dakota #quillwork #supernatural #guild #creator #wakantanka

Victoria Keoni (Navajo, b. 1960) was born in White Cone, Arizona, on the Navajo Reservation. She was raised in a family ...
08/28/2020

Victoria Keoni (Navajo, b. 1960) was born in White Cone, Arizona, on the Navajo Reservation. She was raised in a family of weavers and began creating Navajo (Diné) textiles at the age of 17 under the guidance of her mother Cecelia Nelson.
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Navajo weaving is tied to a rich and ancient mythological past. The Navajo believe that Spider Woman, one of their most important deities, gave the gift of weaving to all Navajo people. For hundreds of years, weaving has thrived in the American Southwest, especially in the Four Corners area (New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado), where the Navajo pastured their sheep.
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In the 1970s, an innovative use of decorative color emerged as a new development in the vegetal-dye movement of contemporary Navajo weaving. This style of weaving was called “Burntwater” after the Pine Springs-Burntwater region of the Navajo Reservation, where multi-bordered pastel and earth-tone vegetal-dyed rugs with finely detailed geometric patterns were executed with sophisticated precision and balance. Burntwater rugs are characterized for their high-quality tapestry-like weave, and command very high prices today. Keoni's rug (33" x 48") is housed in the permanent collection of the Southern Plains Indian Museum, Anadarko, Oklahoma (cat. # A.87.6.2).
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To learn more about Navajo (Diné) textiles, please download a free copy of the IACBs consumer education brochure (2017) How to Buy Authentic Navajo (Diné) Weavings.
www.doi.gov/sites/doi.gov/files/uploads/iacb_navajo_brochure_2017_web.pdf
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#burntwater #navajo #diné #sheep #vegetaldye #weaving #navajoweaving #navajoreservation #fourcorners #spiderwoman #anadarko #geometric

This beaded turtle amulet was created by Julie Broken Rope (Oglala Sioux) in 1971, and today it resides in the collectio...
08/25/2020

This beaded turtle amulet was created by Julie Broken Rope (Oglala Sioux) in 1971, and today it resides in the collection of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board’s Sioux Indian Museum (cat. # R.71.5.30). Constructed of buckskin, cowrie shells, an abalone disc, and glass and brass beads, amulets such as these were provided to Sioux children for their personal well-being. Parents placed their infant’s umbilical cord inside these special containers and, as a protection from disease and illness, tied the amulet to the infant’s cradleboard. Once a female child matured, the amulet was fastened to their ceremonial dress. However, boys did not carry these amulets. Their sisters wore them on a belt.
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According to Yankton Dakota scholar Ella Deloria (Aŋpétu Wašté Wiŋ, Beautiful Day Woman), a beaded turtle charm is called ƥatkáṡa-kṡúpi-wòťawe. In unpublished notes, she wrote that the turtle was a symbol of longevity. She continued: “Wòťawe means charm, in a very broad sense, to cover whatever was held sacred and revered for its ‘inherent power.’ The beadwork over the back was of fancy designs in keeping (though not always a faithful replica) with the design of the reptile’s back.”
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To learn more please visit: www.doi.gov/iacb/turtleamulet

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The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior, was created by Congress to promote the economic development of federally recognized* American Indians and Alaska Natives (Indians) through the expansion of the Indian arts and crafts market. A top priority of the IACB is the implementation and enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 (Act), a truth-in-advertising law that provides criminal and civil penalties for marketing products as "Indian-made" when such products are not made by Indians, as defined by the Act. The IACB's other activities include providing professional business advice, information on the Act and related marketing issues, fundraising assistance, and promotional opportunities to Indian artists, craftspeople, and cultural organizations of federally recognized tribes. The IACB operates three regional museums in the Plains Region, the Sioux Indian Museum, the Museum of the Plains Indian, and the Southern Plains Indian Museum. The IACB also produces a consumer directory of approximately 400 federally recognized Indian owned and operated arts and crafts businesses. These activities are not duplicated in either the federal or private sector. The IACB is the only federal agency that is consistently and exclusively concerned with the economic benefits and cultural development of federally recognized Indians. The IACB's policies are determined by Commissioners who are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior, and serve without compensation. The IACB's activities and programs are carried out by a professional and experienced staff.

* The IACB provides services, including Source Directory listings, to enrolled members of "any Indian tribe, band, nation, or Alaska Native village, or other organized group or community which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians" (25 U.S.C. § 305e(d)(3)(A)). The Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994, 25 U.S.C. §§ 479a(2), 479a-1, requires the Secretary of the Interior to publish a list of all Indian or Alaska Native tribes, bands, nations, pueblos, villages or communities "recognize[d] to be eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians." Consistent with other statutes defining this Department's responsibilities and obligations to Indian tribes, the Department interprets the first definition of Indian tribe in the Indian Arts and Crafts Act as those tribes listed on the tribal entities list published in the Federal Register.

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