Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard Serve your country, part-time, as an attorney in the Air Force Reserve or Air National Guard!

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10 Good Minutes With Brig Gen Neurock1.  What is your name and duty assignment?I’m Brigadier General Mitch Neurock.  My ...
03/15/2021

10 Good Minutes With Brig Gen Neurock

1. What is your name and duty assignment?

I’m Brigadier General Mitch Neurock. My formal title is “Mobilization Assistant to The Judge Advocate General.” I’m assigned at the Pentagon, and I lead the Air Force’s Reserve JAGs and paralegals.

2. What do you do in your current assignment?

As a reservist, I help The Judge Advocate General – a three-star general, the Air Force’s highest ranking attorney – in giving legal advice to the Secretary of the Air Force, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, the Chief of Space Operations, and the rest of the Department of the Air Force. We provide professional oversight of more than 2200 JAGs, 350 civilian attorneys, 1400 enlisted paralegals, and 500 civilian support staffers worldwide.
My own responsibilities involve leading the JAGs and paralegals in the Air Force Reserve – 660 attorneys and 219 paralegals assigned all over the world. Our reservists come from widely different personal and professional backgrounds, but we’re all connected by a commitment to serve. Right now I’m taking a short break from my civilian job to serve on active duty as the Director of the JAG Corps’ Operations and International Law Domain in Washington, DC. My team is responsible for the legal work to help Air Force and Space Force commanders accomplish their missions. So we give advice on cyberspace and information law, space law, and international law. We also handle environmental law matters, and we represent the Air Force in environmental litigation and in claims or lawsuits after aviation mishaps. It’s a fantastic group of people, and a really interesting area of the law.

3. What do you do in your civilian life?

I’m a federal prosecutor. I work for the United States Attorney’s Office in Houston. My civilian office has been super-supportive of my military service, and I use my experiences in the JAG Corps to help my team at the Department of Justice.

4. What is the most interesting/memorable experience you have had in the military?

There are so many ways for JAGs and paralegals to help the mission! Deploying was a truly meaningful experience, life-shaping. I went to Baghdad and worked as a prosecutor at the Central Criminal Court of Iraq. I really felt like I was making a difference, both for the United States and for the Iraqi people. Other service has been rewarding, too. At two of the places where I’ve been assigned, I’ve helped flood victims during recovery – good people had suffered terrible personal losses, and it was important to me that we do everything we could to help them through that trying time.

5. Why did you join the military?

The most natural draw for me was a family connection. My dad served in the Air Force as a dentist, and I grew up on bases all around the country. But family wasn’t all: the sense of community in everything we do is what really resonated with me. It’s what’s kept me connected and motivated and energized through all these years.

6. If you could go back in time, what would you tell your younger self as you were joining the military?

Get out of the office and meet more people around the base! We attorneys can be such an insular bunch (both in the military and in the rest of our profession). We tend to let people come to us, and then we wonder why we feel out of touch. Myself included. It’s so important to build and maintain connection throughout the legal community, and also in the greater military community we serve. It takes work to do that. But it’s worth it. The best lawyers and paralegals are the ones who know the client’s business.

7. Tell us something you learned from a mentor or supervisor in the military.

I learned to do appellate work as an active duty JAG, and I still use that skill today in my civilian job. My supervisor and mentor taught me that it pays to focus on communicating clearly and concisely, both in writing and out loud, no matter what job we hold. Commanders, courts, and clients look to us for “The Answer,” and it’s our responsibility to know it (or find it) and then communicate it plainly. If we can’t do that, we might as well not be there at all.

8. What does it mean to you to be a military JAG Officer?
It means everything! It’s a wonderful privilege to serve and to lead such committed professional people. Our reserve JAGs and paralegals live all over the world, and they come from all backgrounds and from a million different walks of civilian life. We give the JAG Corps a stable, expert, and close-knit force – the best in the world.

9. Do you have any words of advice for someone considering joining the military/JAG Corps/Reserves?

Do it. Don’t wait. There’s never a “perfect” time to raise your hand to serve – there’ll always be a complication or a stressor or something. Start, commit, and follow through. And make sure you do it for the right reasons. Not for glory or accolades or benefits, but for the privilege of using your skills and talents for a greater calling: service to our nation.

10. What food have you never eaten, but really want to try?

Believe it or not: sea urchin! I don’t have much spare time, but I like watching cooking shows, and it’s always fascinated me how the chefs can get inside those things and then produce dishes that the judges seem to love. (There’s only one way for me to really find out, though, right?)

10 Good Minutes with CMSgt List1.  What is your name and duty assignment? Lisa List.  IMA to the Senior Paralegal Manage...
03/15/2021

10 Good Minutes with CMSgt List

1. What is your name and duty assignment?

Lisa List. IMA to the Senior Paralegal Manager to The Judge Advocate General.

2. What do you do in your current assignment?

I augment and backfill the Senior Paralegal Manager to The Judge Advocate General by assisting in Leadership meetings, participating in inspections, gathering and analyzing reports from the field to identify trends in manning, training, and readiness.

3. What do you do in your civilian life?

Nothing at the moment. I am currently serving on extended active duty orders assisting both the Senior Paralegal Manager and the Command Paralegal Manager with special projects. In the past I have been a medical office secretary/tech; Wing Commander’s secretary; and civilian paralegal in a general practice law firm.

4. What is the most interesting/memorable experience you have had in the military?

While serving as a Traditional Reservist at 910 AW, Youngstown ARS, OH, my unit participated in an Operational Readiness Exercise. As part of the exercise, the vast majority of the unit was placed on Annual Tour status and we “deployed” together. We all got on a C-130H and flew to Gulf Port MS. We all worked together to set up tents for barracks, dining, medical, and other various work stations. We practiced responding to chemical/biological attacks, ground base defense, and doing our various jobs in these environments. For legal, invariably the computers were knocked out of commission and we had to type up legal documents on an ancient laptop with portable printer or a typewriter (or in some instances, hand write them out!); paralegals operating without their JAG (walking the line of not giving legal advice but quoting/interpreting various authorities for informed decision making); initiating reach back capability to higher headquarters, etc. All this while going in and out of various levels of chemical warfare gear depending on the threat level (suit, then boots, then gloves and mask), checking for contamination or infiltration by combatants, and practicing self-aide and buddy care of “the injured”. It was not easy - it was hard work and long hours, but the fellowship, unit cohesiveness and the culmination of how what we do serves the greater cause will forever be a reminder to me that what we do matters. This is not easy to see or appreciate in the day to day grind, but it is vital we make a concerted effort to remind ourselves why were are here…we are here to serve. We are not just Judge Advocates and paralegals…we are Airmen.

5. Why did you join the military?

My grades did not make me competitive for scholarships, and I did not want school loan debt. I have always been a hard worker, even during high school, but the types of jobs I qualified for at that point would not get me out of the house (my parents were old school - you graduate, you out!). The summer after my freshman year in high school I was sent to my grandfather’s home in Anchorage, AK, for a short visit. He was a contractor on Elmendorf AFB (he also spent several years in the Reserve there). He took me to base several times during my visit and I fell in love with the base and the planes. I decided then to join the Air Force. I enlisted in the delayed entry program and have no regrets.

6. If you could go back in time, what would you tell your younger self as you were joining the military?

Don’t mind the little things. Don’t get upset about things that you have no control over; focus on what you do have control over. Save your energy for worthy battles.

7. Tell us something you learned from a mentor or supervisor in the military.

Don’t self-eliminate from opportunities. Although it may not be a goal of yours at this moment, if you have the time, money, energy, etc. to complete higher education, developmental education, etc., do it! You won’t be forced into an assignment, or higher graded position, but if the opportunity arises, let YOU be the deciding factor, not the limitations of not having completed a requirement.

8. What does it mean to you to be a military/JAG Corps/Reserves?

It sounds very cliché, but I love being a part of something bigger than myself. I love serving. This is a way for me to give back and pay it forward, if you will, for all those who served before me, to ensure that our rights, and the rights of future generations, are preserved. We are not a perfect nation. We make mistakes along the way, but we strive to do better, and that is so very important. It is just as important to hold those who stray from acceptable conduct to be held accountable for their actions. This is why I am passionate about the JAG Corps in particular.

9. Do you have any words of advice for someone considering joining the military/JAG Corps/Reserves?

Do it!! There are not many companies that will allow you to work part time while investing in you with top notch training, benefits such as TSP/401K, medical (albeit limited) and the ability to practically fund 100% of your or a family member’s college (Post 9/11 GI Bill), together with a myriad of untold other benefits. And these are just the benefits to YOU! You will also have the opportunity to work with, mentor, and lead some the finest men and women in the USA, and make a positive difference in their lives as well.

10. What food have you never eaten, but really want to try?

I have never eaten sushi, but to be honest, I don’t really want to try it either

03/15/2021

Test

Some of our Reserve JAG senior leaders had the opportunity to work with USAFA cadets at the Center for Character and Lea...
06/10/2019

Some of our Reserve JAG senior leaders had the opportunity to work with USAFA cadets at the Center for Character and Leadership Development in April.

The JAG IMA Senior Leadership Course was held 24-26 Apr 2019 at the Center for Character and Leadership Develpoment, US Air Force Academy, Colorado. Senior IMA and Unit Reserve JAGs and paralegals made up the student roster of 37. The theme of the course was multi-generational remote leadership. During the three-day course, the students received instruction on Air Force and JAG Corps Reserve processes to help them manage people and programs. To further develop their leadership skills, they received advanced leadership briefings form the CCLD staff and engaged in hands-on leadership exercises. In addition, they participated in teambuilding exercises and had multiple opportunities to interact with future AF leaders. For more photos of the event, visit:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/af_academy/albums/72157706899341111

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard
05/30/2019

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard

If you're interested in what the active duty JAGs look for in applicants, tune in.
05/29/2019

If you're interested in what the active duty JAGs look for in applicants, tune in.

Want to know what AF JAG Corps selection board members look for in an application? On Sunday, June 2, 2019 at 1330 EST, Maj Tyler Musselman will have a Facebook Live session to cover that topic.

Maj Musselman will review the top feedback recommendations from 2018-2019 academic year selection board members. He will cover tips for applying to our Internship/Externship programs, our ROTC entry programs, and our Direct Appointment Program. If you are thinking about applying to any of our AF JAG Corps programs in the future (like our September Selection Board), this is a great opportunity to get pointers about your application package. See you then!

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard's cover photo
05/29/2019

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard's cover photo

02/24/2015

Almost 500 "likes" and counting! Thanks to all of you for your support of our program!

12/18/2012

During this holiday season, maybe you're thinking about life, and your place in it. Are you making a difference? If you're an experienced attorney, consider stretching farther -- consider serving our nation as a judge advocate in the Air Force Reserve or Air National Guard. Nearly 900 attorneys are making a difference by serving our country in our Air Force part-time programs. Food for thought...Happy Holidays!

09/25/2012

200 "likes" and counting! Thanks to all of you for your support of our program!

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard's cover photo
05/09/2012

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard's cover photo

Timeline Photos
05/09/2012

Timeline Photos

Colonel Neurock and the Air Force JAG contingent at the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association convention in At...
11/22/2011

Colonel Neurock and the Air Force JAG contingent at the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association convention in Atlanta -- great candidates, great success!

10/07/2011

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard
Check our our newly-remodeled public web site! Visit us at http://jagrecruiting.law.af.mil/ to learn all about our various programs, training and education requirements, and application procedures. Tell us what you think!

Major General Steven J. Lepper, Deputy Judge Advocate General, joins new Air Force Reserve JAGs at the Reserve Orientati...
08/15/2011

Major General Steven J. Lepper, Deputy Judge Advocate General, joins new Air Force Reserve JAGs at the Reserve Orientation Course in Denver. The Air Force has selected more than 100 Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard judge advocates this year, and the twice-yearly Reserve Orientation Course provides these attorneys with practical advice and instruction for navigating life in the Air Reserve Component.

National Bar Association Aug 2011
08/09/2011

National Bar Association Aug 2011

07/30/2011

Our program is growing by leaps and bounds! We have 20 (count 'em!) Air Reserve Component students currently participating in the Judge Advocate Staff Officer Course, our basic legal course for new Air Force judge advocates. Their enthusiasm and motivation are tremendous. Explore our page here, and learn more!

05/24/2011

Last year we selected experienced attorneys from 34 states, the District of Columbia, and three foreign countries to serve as judge advocates in the Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard. Please explore our page (especially the discussion topics), and contact us to learn more -- join us!

03/06/2011

We selected 120 licensed attorneys to join the Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard in 2010, and we're looking forward to welcoming many more! Learn about our part-time program, right here!

02/24/2011

Are you an experienced attorney seeking a new challenge? Have you always wanted to serve your country, but the timing never seemed quite right? The Judge Advocate General's Corps Reserve is seeking qualified attorneys for part-time positions! Please explore our page, learn about our programs, and see whether you'd make a good addition to our Corps.

Thanks for visiting, and for your interest in serving our country!

New Air Force Reserve JAGs gather for the Reserve Orientation Course in Atlanta, 11-12 February 2011.  The TJAG Junior O...
02/12/2011

New Air Force Reserve JAGs gather for the Reserve Orientation Course in Atlanta, 11-12 February 2011. The TJAG Junior Officer Council, Air Force Reserve Command Legal Office, and TJAG IT Readiness Committee work together to produce this course, which helps our newest reservists learn the day-to-day workings of the reserve program.

Air Force Reserve JAGs at the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association Convention.  Brigadier General Dixie Morro...
01/29/2011

Air Force Reserve JAGs at the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association Convention. Brigadier General Dixie Morrow, along with Colonel Mitch Neurock, with Assistant United States Attorneys Daniel Hu and Diana Song from the Southern District of Texas.

12/15/2010

The Judge Advocate General's Corps Reserve is seeking qualified attorneys for part-time judge advocate positions! Please explore, learn about our programs, and see whether you'd make a good addition to our Corps.

Thanks for visiting our page, and for your interest in serving our country -- we look forward to networking with you!

Address

1420 Air Force Pentagon
Washington D.C., DC
20330-1420

General information

Whether you have prior military experience or not, service as a judge advocate in the Air Reserve Component is an exciting and rewarding part-time career. Here, you'll find information on how to join our Corps, facts about our practice and about life in the Air Reserve Component, eligibility requirements, application processes, benefits, and much more. Come serve with us! Contact Mr. Errol Hughes at (866) 213-0497 to learn more.

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Be an Air Force Reserve Judge Advocate!

Whether you have prior military experience or not, service as a judge advocate in the Air Reserve Component is an exciting and rewarding part-time career. Come serve with us!

Contact (866) 213-0497 or visit https://afreserve.com/JAG/ to learn more.

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10 Good Minutes With Brig Gen Neurock 1. What is your name and duty assignment? I’m Brigadier General Mitch Neurock. My formal title is “Mobilization Assistant to the Deputy Judge Advocate General.” I’m assigned at the Pentagon, and I lead the Air Force’s Reserve JAGs and paralegals. 2. What do you do in your current assignment? As a reservist, I help the Deputy Judge Advocate General: a two-star general – the Air Force’s second- highest ranking attorney. Together, we aid The Judge Advocate General (our three-star general who leads the entire JAG Corps) in giving legal advice to the Secretary of the Air Force, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, the Chief of Space Operations, and the rest of the Department of the Air Force. We provide professional oversight of more than 2200 JAGs, 350 civilian attorneys, 1400 enlisted paralegals, and 500 civilian support staffers worldwide. My own responsibilities involve leading the JAGs and paralegals in the Air Force Reserve – 660 attorneys and 219 paralegals assigned all over the world. Our reservists come from widely different personal and professional backgrounds, but we’re all connected by a commitment to serve. Right now I’m taking a short break from my civilian job to serve on active duty as the Director of the JAG Corps’ Operations and International Law Domain in Washington, DC. My team is responsible for the legal work to help Air Force and Space Force commanders accomplish their missions. So we give advice on cyberspace and information law, space law, and international law. We also handle environmental law matters, and we represent the Air Force in environmental litigation and in claims or lawsuits after aviation mishaps. It’s a fantastic group of people, and a really interesting area of the law. 3. What do you do in your civilian life? I’m a federal prosecutor. I work for the United States Attorney’s Office in Houston. My civilian office has been super-supportive of my military service, and I use my experiences in the JAG Corps to help my team at the Department of Justice. 4. What is the most interesting/memorable experience you have had in the military? There are so many ways for JAGs and paralegals to help the mission! Deploying was a truly meaningful experience, life-shaping. I went to Baghdad and worked as a prosecutor at the Central Criminal Court of Iraq. I really felt like I was making a difference, both for the United States and for the Iraqi people. Other service has been rewarding, too. At two of the places where I’ve been assigned, I’ve helped flood victims during recovery – good people had suffered terrible personal losses, and it was important to me that we do everything we could to help them through that trying time. 5. Why did you join the military? The most natural draw for me was a family connection. My dad served in the Air Force as a dentist, and I grew up on bases all around the country. But family wasn’t all: the sense of community in everything we do is what really resonated with me. It’s what’s kept me connected and motivated and energized through all these years. 6. If you could go back in time, what would you tell your younger self as you were joining the military? Get out of the office and meet more people around the base! We attorneys can be such an insular bunch (both in the military and in the rest of our profession). We tend to let people come to us, and then we wonder why we feel out of touch. Myself included. It’s so important to build and maintain connection throughout the legal community, and also in the greater military community we serve. It takes work to do that. But it’s worth it. The best lawyers and paralegals are the ones who know the client’s business. 7. Tell us something you learned from a mentor or supervisor in the military. I learned to do appellate work as an active duty JAG, and I still use that skill today in my civilian job. My supervisor and mentor taught me that it pays to focus on communicating clearly and concisely, both in writing and out loud, no matter what job we hold. Commanders, courts, and clients look to us for “The Answer,” and it’s our responsibility to know it (or find it) and then communicate it plainly. If we can’t do that, we might as well not be there at all. 8. What does it mean to you to be a military JAG Officer? It means everything! It’s a wonderful privilege to serve and to lead such committed professional people. Our reserve JAGs and paralegals live all over the world, and they come from all backgrounds and from a million different walks of civilian life. We give the JAG Corps a stable, expert, and close-knit force – the best in the world. 9. Do you have any words of advice for someone considering joining the military/JAG Corps/Reserves? Do it. Don’t wait. There’s never a “perfect” time to raise your hand to serve – there’ll always be a complication or a stressor or something. Start, commit, and follow through. And make sure you do it for the right reasons. Not for glory or accolades or benefits, but for the privilege of using your skills and talents for a greater calling: service to our nation. 10. What food have you never eaten, but really want to try? Believe it or not: sea urchin! I don’t have much spare time, but I like watching cooking shows, and it’s always fascinated me how the chefs can get inside those things and then produce dishes that the judges seem to love. (There’s only one way for me to really find out, though, right?)