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Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard

Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard Serve your country, part-time, as an attorney in the Air Force Reserve or Air National Guard!

Operating as usual

10 Good minutes with CMSgt Williams:1.  What is your name and duty assignment?CMSgt Stephatina Williams, AFMC IMA to the...
04/24/2022

10 Good minutes with CMSgt Williams:

1. What is your name and duty assignment?
CMSgt Stephatina Williams, AFMC IMA to the Functional Manager

2. What do you do in your current assignment? I haven’t performed duty yet, but my position entails, serving as the primary advisor to the to the Command Counsel and Staff Judge Advocate concerning IMA paralegal activities to include manpower, organization, training, and development. Bottom line, taking care of our members.



3. What do you do in your civilian life?

No civilian job at this time. Currently on MPA tour for AF/JAR as Interim Chief, Enlisted Development and MPA Program Manager after 7 years as an AGR. Previously, I was a Paralegal Specialist for US Dept of State, Washington DC for 10 years.

4. What is the most interesting/memorable experience you have had in the military?

My most memorable experience was being a First Sgt and getting to know the people that do various jobs. There is a story behind everyone that wears the uniform. It could be something you can personally relate to. Or if you can’t relate, you would have learned something new. We are surrounded by talented Airman and Guardians everyday with a story or talent to share.

5. Why did you join the military? I joined the military to set the stage to one day return to college. I had partied my freshman year all the way to academic probation. Very much outside my character of being A/B student, Senior Class President, and community/youth advocate. Served 4 years on active duty, then joined reserve. After 26 years of total service, I have 4- CCAF degrees (Aviation, Transportation, Paralegal, and Human Resources; 1- Bachelors of Arts in Paralegal Studies; 1- Masters of Arts in Public Administration.

6. If you could go back in time, what would you tell your younger self as you were joining the military?

Invest and save your money. Explore by car within an 8 hour radius of your duty station. Remember to stay focused, you have a voice and keep your eyes on the prize/goals. Those that are meant to be in your life and on this journey will continue to do so no matter where you may be in the world.

7. Tell us something you learned from a mentor or supervisor in the military.

Always take care of your people as you were or were not taken care of. Ask the simple questions. Let them know you care. Talk with your people not at them.

8. What does it mean to you to be a military paralegal?

To be a military paralegal, it means to be apart of a professional community of family. A place where we care about you and your growth personally and professionally.

9. Do you have any words of advice for someone considering joining the military/JAG Corps/Reserves?

Have a plan or goals you personally want to achieve and do it in the military. You will learn a new skill, explore that skill set to the fullest, become the subject matter expert. Share you talents and experience willingly. Grow the next generation of your replacements to lead in the future.

10. What food have you never eaten, but really want to try?

Good question. I’ll try anything once.

10 Good Minutes With Brig Gen Neurock1.  What is your name and duty assignment?I’m Brigadier General Mitch Neurock.  My ...
03/15/2021

10 Good Minutes With Brig Gen Neurock

1. What is your name and duty assignment?

I’m Brigadier General Mitch Neurock. My formal title is “Mobilization Assistant to The Judge Advocate General.” I’m assigned at the Pentagon, and I lead the Air Force’s Reserve JAGs and paralegals.

2. What do you do in your current assignment?

As a reservist, I help The Judge Advocate General – a three-star general, the Air Force’s highest ranking attorney – in giving legal advice to the Secretary of the Air Force, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, the Chief of Space Operations, and the rest of the Department of the Air Force. We provide professional oversight of more than 2200 JAGs, 350 civilian attorneys, 1400 enlisted paralegals, and 500 civilian support staffers worldwide.
My own responsibilities involve leading the JAGs and paralegals in the Air Force Reserve – 660 attorneys and 219 paralegals assigned all over the world. Our reservists come from widely different personal and professional backgrounds, but we’re all connected by a commitment to serve. Right now I’m taking a short break from my civilian job to serve on active duty as the Director of the JAG Corps’ Operations and International Law Domain in Washington, DC. My team is responsible for the legal work to help Air Force and Space Force commanders accomplish their missions. So we give advice on cyberspace and information law, space law, and international law. We also handle environmental law matters, and we represent the Air Force in environmental litigation and in claims or lawsuits after aviation mishaps. It’s a fantastic group of people, and a really interesting area of the law.

3. What do you do in your civilian life?

I’m a federal prosecutor. I work for the United States Attorney’s Office in Houston. My civilian office has been super-supportive of my military service, and I use my experiences in the JAG Corps to help my team at the Department of Justice.

4. What is the most interesting/memorable experience you have had in the military?

There are so many ways for JAGs and paralegals to help the mission! Deploying was a truly meaningful experience, life-shaping. I went to Baghdad and worked as a prosecutor at the Central Criminal Court of Iraq. I really felt like I was making a difference, both for the United States and for the Iraqi people. Other service has been rewarding, too. At two of the places where I’ve been assigned, I’ve helped flood victims during recovery – good people had suffered terrible personal losses, and it was important to me that we do everything we could to help them through that trying time.

5. Why did you join the military?

The most natural draw for me was a family connection. My dad served in the Air Force as a dentist, and I grew up on bases all around the country. But family wasn’t all: the sense of community in everything we do is what really resonated with me. It’s what’s kept me connected and motivated and energized through all these years.

6. If you could go back in time, what would you tell your younger self as you were joining the military?

Get out of the office and meet more people around the base! We attorneys can be such an insular bunch (both in the military and in the rest of our profession). We tend to let people come to us, and then we wonder why we feel out of touch. Myself included. It’s so important to build and maintain connection throughout the legal community, and also in the greater military community we serve. It takes work to do that. But it’s worth it. The best lawyers and paralegals are the ones who know the client’s business.

7. Tell us something you learned from a mentor or supervisor in the military.

I learned to do appellate work as an active duty JAG, and I still use that skill today in my civilian job. My supervisor and mentor taught me that it pays to focus on communicating clearly and concisely, both in writing and out loud, no matter what job we hold. Commanders, courts, and clients look to us for “The Answer,” and it’s our responsibility to know it (or find it) and then communicate it plainly. If we can’t do that, we might as well not be there at all.

8. What does it mean to you to be a military JAG Officer?
It means everything! It’s a wonderful privilege to serve and to lead such committed professional people. Our reserve JAGs and paralegals live all over the world, and they come from all backgrounds and from a million different walks of civilian life. We give the JAG Corps a stable, expert, and close-knit force – the best in the world.

9. Do you have any words of advice for someone considering joining the military/JAG Corps/Reserves?

Do it. Don’t wait. There’s never a “perfect” time to raise your hand to serve – there’ll always be a complication or a stressor or something. Start, commit, and follow through. And make sure you do it for the right reasons. Not for glory or accolades or benefits, but for the privilege of using your skills and talents for a greater calling: service to our nation.

10. What food have you never eaten, but really want to try?

Believe it or not: sea urchin! I don’t have much spare time, but I like watching cooking shows, and it’s always fascinated me how the chefs can get inside those things and then produce dishes that the judges seem to love. (There’s only one way for me to really find out, though, right?)

Address

1420 Air Force Pentagon
Washington D.C., DC
20330-1420

Opening Hours

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Tuesday 7am - 6pm
Wednesday 7am - 6pm
Thursday 7am - 6pm
Friday 7am - 6pm

Telephone

+18662130497

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Day 22 of 31 Days of #CorpsToons Beginning the New Year with humor - favorites and new. Please share the morale and laughs! US Navy JAG Corps Air Force JAG Recruiting - Reserve and Guard U.S. Army JAG Corps
10 Good Minutes With Brig Gen Neurock 1. What is your name and duty assignment? I’m Brigadier General Mitch Neurock. My formal title is “Mobilization Assistant to the Deputy Judge Advocate General.” I’m assigned at the Pentagon, and I lead the Air Force’s Reserve JAGs and paralegals. 2. What do you do in your current assignment? As a reservist, I help the Deputy Judge Advocate General: a two-star general – the Air Force’s second- highest ranking attorney. Together, we aid The Judge Advocate General (our three-star general who leads the entire JAG Corps) in giving legal advice to the Secretary of the Air Force, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, the Chief of Space Operations, and the rest of the Department of the Air Force. We provide professional oversight of more than 2200 JAGs, 350 civilian attorneys, 1400 enlisted paralegals, and 500 civilian support staffers worldwide. My own responsibilities involve leading the JAGs and paralegals in the Air Force Reserve – 660 attorneys and 219 paralegals assigned all over the world. Our reservists come from widely different personal and professional backgrounds, but we’re all connected by a commitment to serve. Right now I’m taking a short break from my civilian job to serve on active duty as the Director of the JAG Corps’ Operations and International Law Domain in Washington, DC. My team is responsible for the legal work to help Air Force and Space Force commanders accomplish their missions. So we give advice on cyberspace and information law, space law, and international law. We also handle environmental law matters, and we represent the Air Force in environmental litigation and in claims or lawsuits after aviation mishaps. It’s a fantastic group of people, and a really interesting area of the law. 3. What do you do in your civilian life? I’m a federal prosecutor. I work for the United States Attorney’s Office in Houston. My civilian office has been super-supportive of my military service, and I use my experiences in the JAG Corps to help my team at the Department of Justice. 4. What is the most interesting/memorable experience you have had in the military? There are so many ways for JAGs and paralegals to help the mission! Deploying was a truly meaningful experience, life-shaping. I went to Baghdad and worked as a prosecutor at the Central Criminal Court of Iraq. I really felt like I was making a difference, both for the United States and for the Iraqi people. Other service has been rewarding, too. At two of the places where I’ve been assigned, I’ve helped flood victims during recovery – good people had suffered terrible personal losses, and it was important to me that we do everything we could to help them through that trying time. 5. Why did you join the military? The most natural draw for me was a family connection. My dad served in the Air Force as a dentist, and I grew up on bases all around the country. But family wasn’t all: the sense of community in everything we do is what really resonated with me. It’s what’s kept me connected and motivated and energized through all these years. 6. If you could go back in time, what would you tell your younger self as you were joining the military? Get out of the office and meet more people around the base! We attorneys can be such an insular bunch (both in the military and in the rest of our profession). We tend to let people come to us, and then we wonder why we feel out of touch. Myself included. It’s so important to build and maintain connection throughout the legal community, and also in the greater military community we serve. It takes work to do that. But it’s worth it. The best lawyers and paralegals are the ones who know the client’s business. 7. Tell us something you learned from a mentor or supervisor in the military. I learned to do appellate work as an active duty JAG, and I still use that skill today in my civilian job. My supervisor and mentor taught me that it pays to focus on communicating clearly and concisely, both in writing and out loud, no matter what job we hold. Commanders, courts, and clients look to us for “The Answer,” and it’s our responsibility to know it (or find it) and then communicate it plainly. If we can’t do that, we might as well not be there at all. 8. What does it mean to you to be a military JAG Officer? It means everything! It’s a wonderful privilege to serve and to lead such committed professional people. Our reserve JAGs and paralegals live all over the world, and they come from all backgrounds and from a million different walks of civilian life. We give the JAG Corps a stable, expert, and close-knit force – the best in the world. 9. Do you have any words of advice for someone considering joining the military/JAG Corps/Reserves? Do it. Don’t wait. There’s never a “perfect” time to raise your hand to serve – there’ll always be a complication or a stressor or something. Start, commit, and follow through. And make sure you do it for the right reasons. Not for glory or accolades or benefits, but for the privilege of using your skills and talents for a greater calling: service to our nation. 10. What food have you never eaten, but really want to try? Believe it or not: sea urchin! I don’t have much spare time, but I like watching cooking shows, and it’s always fascinated me how the chefs can get inside those things and then produce dishes that the judges seem to love. (There’s only one way for me to really find out, though, right?)