Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy

Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy The Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy is a key advisor to the Chief of Naval Operations on issues related to oceanography and meteorology.
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The Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy is responsible for providing Naval leadership on issues related to oceanography, meteorology, hydrography, precise time, climate change, the Arctic, geospatial and celestial referencing. The office is led by Oceanographer of the Navy, Rear Adm. Jon Okon whose role also includes navigator and hydrographer of the Navy as well as the senior policy advisor for issues related to national ocean policy and governance. The office's roles under Navigator of the Navy includes providing policy and requirements guidance to ensure naval forces have state-of-the-practice positioning, navigation and timing capabilities for accurate operational maneuver and optimum weapons employment, enabling a competitive advantage across the full spectrum of naval and joint warfare. The Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy has five branches. They are:

-- Task Force Ocean
-- Task Force Climate Change
-- Positioning, Navigation and Timing
-- Naval Deputy to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
-- Oceanography Capabilities and Requirements

Operating as usual

Read Adm. Okon discussed recent accomplishments and the state of Naval Oceanography at this year’s American Meteorologic...
01/08/2019

Read Adm. Okon discussed recent accomplishments and the state of Naval Oceanography at this year’s American Meteorological Society annual meeting.

Rear Adm. Okon discussed the state of #NavalOceanography on Monday at the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) Annual Conference held in Phoenix.

“It starts with us! All Naval Warfare, at all levels - strategic, operational and tactical - starts with planning and we provide that vital edge in environmental characterization, prediction and affects that give our operating forces superiority.”

AMS’s annual meeting is a gathering of scientists, educators, students and industry professionals from across the weather, water and climate community. #ItStartsWithUs #AMS2019

(U.S. Navy photo released by MaryKate DeWitt)

11/27/2018
AFN Naples

AFN Naples

USNS Pathfinder (T-AGS 60) had a special guest visit during their port call in Naples, Italy. Petty Officer Rhodes has the story!

“Our decades-long competitive advantage in the undersea domain is eroding. This is not a Navy problem—it is our nation’s...
10/29/2018
Office of Naval Research

“Our decades-long competitive advantage in the undersea domain is eroding. This is not a Navy problem—it is our nation’s problem,” said Oceanographer of the Navy Rear Adm. John Okon. “As Task Force Ocean continues to evolve, we must remain focused on advancing ocean science and uniting our nation’s intellectual capital to increase our competitive advantage.”

Advancing ocean sciences: At the 2018 Oceans Conference held last week in Charleston, South Carolina, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. David Hahn discussed Task Force Ocean (TFO), a program designed to reinvigorate the Navy’s partnership with the national ocean science community. Under TFO, ONR will increase naval oceanographic research that will help the Navy keep its competitive advantage.

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare Vice Adm. Matthew Kohler recently announced that applications a...
10/18/2018

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare Vice Adm. Matthew Kohler recently announced that applications are being accepted for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Joint Master's Degree in Oceanography Program.

The program is open to qualified unrestricted line and oceanography community officers as well as U.S. Naval Academy and Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and graduating midshipmen.

During a recent ceremony held at MIT celebrating the program's 50th anniversary Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson, a graduate of the program, discussed the value of the program to the Navy. “MIT, Woods Hole and the Navy have a rich history going back well into the 1940s of joining together, teaming together, helping each other out and tackling some of the toughest challenges facing our nation. And this program is a great representative of that partnership. In terms of thinking about developing the next generation of ocean scientists and ocean practitioners, we in the Navy think of this [program] as a jewel or bright star in the constellation of possibilities in ocean sciences.”

The joint program is administered by an interdisciplinary team consisting of MIT faculty and WHOI scientists. Navy students follow the Applied Ocean Science and Engineering or Physical Oceanography track. The opportunity to study in a prestigious program and challenge to learn the dynamics, interactions and evolutions of the world beneath the sea surface are, in part, what attracted a current student of the joint program.

“The joint program, through research opportunities and coursework, has challenged me to learn and appreciate the real science behind many of the models and tactical decisions aids I have used for years, said Lt. Cmdr. Stephan Gallagher. This experience will be critical as I become a more senior METOC [meteorology and oceanography] officer charged with guiding research and development for future tactical decision aids, at the appropriate cost and with risks considered—all founded in the science.”

Interested applicants should visit the following NAVADMIN for further details https://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/reference/messages/Documents/NAVADMINS/NAV2018/NAV18162.txt

(Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson SM ’89, EE ’89, ENG ’89 is the senior four-star admiral leading the U.S. Navy. He outlined the challenges ahead for the Navy and invited solutions during an MIT symposium in honor of one of his mentors, Alan Oppenheim, an MIT Ford Professor of Engineering, photo courtesy of MIT.)

Naval Oceanography
10/02/2018
Naval Oceanography

Naval Oceanography

Rear Adm. Okon is in his hometown of Syracuse this week talking #NavalOceanography and the #NavyTheNationNeeds. #EEV #ExecutiveOutreach

Last week, Capt. Sean Memmen retired after 26 years of service to the U.S. Navy.  Most recently Capt. Memmen served on t...
08/10/2018

Last week, Capt. Sean Memmen retired after 26 years of service to the U.S. Navy. Most recently Capt. Memmen served on the Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy's staff as the branch head for Positioning, Navigation and Timing. Oceanographer of the Navy and Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command Rear Adm. John Okon presided over Memmen's retirement, which was held at the National Museum of the U.S. Navy in Washington D.C. (U.S. Navy photos by Brian N. Leshak)

Naval Oceanography provided and is operating U.S. Navy unmanned underwater vehicles in a joint program with NOAA to help...
08/07/2018
Navy Partners with NOAA on Glider Hurricane Research Program

Naval Oceanography provided and is operating U.S. Navy unmanned underwater vehicles in a joint program with NOAA to help improve hurricane intensity forecasts. Check out the story below to learn how this is potentially beneficial to the Navy and our Nation.

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=106603

U.S. Navy is partnering with NOAA to utilize unmanned underwater vehicles to help improve hurricane intensity forecasts.

Last week, Deputy Oceanographer of the Navy Dr. Chris Ekstrom accompanied Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy Ins...
08/02/2018

Last week, Deputy Oceanographer of the Navy Dr. Chris Ekstrom accompanied Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy Installations and Environment Phyllis Bayer, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Environment Karnig Ohannessian and Chief of Naval Operation's Deputy Director, Environmental Readiness Division Dr. Susan Goodfellow during a tour of the National Ice Center located just outside of Washington D.C. in Suitland, Md.

During the tour Cmdr. Ruth Lane, Commanding Officer for the Naval Ice Center and Director, U.S. National Ice Center and her staff provided insights into the ice center's operations and products developed to support Sailors and Marines in collaboration with NOAA and the U.S. Coast Guard.

The U.S. National Ice Center is a multi agency operational center operated by the Navy, NOAA and U.S. Coast Guard that provides global ice and snow analysis and forecasting services for the benefit of U.S. government interests. (U.S. Navy photos by Brian N. Leshak.)

Congratulations to Dr. Chris Ekstrom who was recently named the Deputy Oceanographer of the Navy for the Office of the O...
07/27/2018

Congratulations to Dr. Chris Ekstrom who was recently named the Deputy Oceanographer of the Navy for the Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy.

He will also serve as the Technical Director to the Oceanographer of the Navy, Rear Adm. John Okon. His portfolio includes naval oceanography, meteorology and Positioning, Navigation, and Timing.

Prior to his arrival to the Oceanographer’s staff Dr. Ekstrom served as the Head of Requirements and Research and Development for Precise Time and Astrometry at the U.S. Naval Observatory.

Dr. Ekstrom received his Ph.D. in Experimental Atomic Physics from MIT and his B.S. in Physics from the University of Washington. He has received the Navy Meritorious Civilian Award, the AFCEA/USNI Copernicus Award, and the U.S. Naval Observatory Simon Newcomb Award. He holds DAWIA certifications in both Program Management and Science and Technical Management. Dr. Ekstrom has published more than 35 papers and proceedings in the areas of atomic physics, atom and quantum optics, and atomic clock development.

Please join us in welcoming Deputy Oceanogapher of the Navy, Dr. Chris Ekstrom.

The Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy’s staff was proud to brief teachers on the importance of Naval Oceanography ...
07/18/2018

The Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy’s staff was proud to brief teachers on the importance of Naval Oceanography earlier this week, who were gathered from around the country attending the Maury Project Workshop held at the U.S. Naval Academy’s Oceanography Department.

The Maury Project is a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics teacher professional development program supported by the American Meteorological Society.

"Our mission is to ensure our Sailors and the Fleet operate as effectively and safely as possible, while providing them an accurate picture of their environment that results in a tactical advantage," said Cmdr. Jonathan Vorrath, Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy. It all starts with us. Nothing happens in the Navy that doesn't begin with, or is impacted by, a forecast from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography enterprise."

05/28/2018

A message from the Oceanographer of the Navy:

"Each of the patriots whom we remember on this day was first a beloved son or daughter, a brother or sister, or a spouse, friend, and neighbor." — George H. W. Bush

Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Force and Families,

On this Memorial Day I ask that we come together to remember and recognize those Americans that have died in the service of our great Nation.

Wherever you are and whatever you are doing at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day, please stop for a moment and join the nation in a Moment of Silence out of remembrance and respect for all our fallen. For it is days like Memorial Day that we must truly remember why we fight. Our Brothers and Sisters in arms who paid the ultimate sacrifice defending the powerful words and ideals in the Constitution and the freedoms and liberties that we enjoy today.

This past weekend my wife Valerie and I had the honor to meet Ms. Sophy P-Q Haynes, a Gold-Star Mother from New York City. Sophy lost her son Sergeant First Class Schuyler Haynes, US Army in 2006 while fighting with the 1st Calvary Division in Iraq. As we said goodbye at the end of the event, which you could tell was difficult on Sophy, I offered our love and support and promise that we would continue to carry forward Schuyler’s service and commitment to our country. With incredible courage and grace, Sophy looked me right in the eye and said ‘I love my country and love, understand and appreciate the sacrifices of the brave servicemen and servicewomen.’ Sophy, like so many Gold-Star families, does not want us to dwell on Schuyler’s death or the deaths of other servicemen and servicewomen, but rather let their devotion to duty, their sacrifices and those of their families, and the very lives they led, be symbols of hope and resilience. We are called to ensure our thoughts and actions (our character) honor the sacrifices of those who have gone before us.

Valerie and I remain honored and humbled by the professionalism, commitment and humility of our Naval Oceanography Family, a Family nearly 2,500 strong. Finally, our thoughts and prayers are with our Shipmates - active duty, civilians and reservists - overseas, standing the watch, doing the Nation’s business so we can enjoy the weekend with family.

God Bless you all.

John A. Okon
Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command
Oceanographer of the Navy

Earlier this week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Commissioned Officer Corps celebrated its 101st ...
05/25/2018

Earlier this week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Commissioned Officer Corps celebrated its 101st anniversary. In recognition, a member the Oceanographer of the Navy's staff hosted a presentation at the Pentagon to discuss the relationship between the Navy and NOAA, the NOAA Corps and his experience as part of hurricane hunter flight operations.

"Natural security certainly applies to national security," said Naval Deputy to NOAA Liason Officer Cmdr. Jason Mansour, Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy. "The exchange of professional expertise between Navy and NOAA is critical. As NAVDEPP NOAA liaison officers it's our job to leverage partnerships and work on ways to share data across the services to improve our models and forecast products."

Naval Deputy to NOAA is a branch that falls under the roles and responsibilities of the Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy. (U.S. Navy photo by Brian Leshak.)

It's all hands on deck at Fleet Week New York City this week.  The Naval Oceanography enterprise is attending in full fo...
05/23/2018

It's all hands on deck at Fleet Week New York City this week. The Naval Oceanography enterprise is attending in full force helping to showcase the Navy the Nation Needs. #ItStartsWithUs

#USNSMaury manning the rails at #FleetWeekNYC Parade of Ships. Happening right now 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸 #NavalOceanography #ItStartsWithUs

Naval Oceanography was well represented during this week's 2018 Sea Air Space Expo.  From Oceanographer of the Navy Rear...
04/11/2018

Naval Oceanography was well represented during this week's 2018 Sea Air Space Expo. From Oceanographer of the Navy Rear Adm. John Okon discussing the importance of science and partnerships behind Arctic prediction capabilities to team members from the Naval Oceanographic Office, Fleet Survey Team and Naval Oceanography Mine Warfare Center discussing how unmanned systems are used to collect oceanographic data and play an important role to the Information Warfare Community. (U.S. Navy photos by Brian N Leshak.)

Our oceanographers are on top of the world supporting a U.S. Navy ice camp set up for a five-week biennial exercise that...
03/17/2018

Our oceanographers are on top of the world supporting a U.S. Navy ice camp set up for a five-week biennial exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic.

“I’m here to provide and maintain the expeditionary weather stations at the ice camp to generate weather forecasting for the Arctic Submarine Laboratory and the different pilots supporting the exercise. This year, I’m the only Navy meteorology and oceanography (METOC) officer working alongside two U.K. METOCs. We are launching balloons to collect data such as temperature, the thickness of the atmosphere, wind speed and direction, and also analyzing the ice conditions. The data is fed back to us so we can generate all the weather models and forecasts to improve the daily operability of the many personnel and assets in the Arctic region during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018, said Lt. Emily Motz, ICEX 2018 METOC officer."

Faces of ICEX: “I’m here to provide and maintain the expeditionary weather stations at the ice camp to generate weather forecasting for the Arctic Submarine Laboratory and the different pilots supporting the exercise. This year, I’m the only Navy meteorology and oceanography (METOC) officer working alongside two U.K. METOCs. We are launching balloons to collect data such as temperature, the thickness of the atmosphere, wind speed and direction, and also analyzing the ice conditions. The data is fed back to us so we can generate all the weather models and forecasts to improve the daily operability of the many personnel and assets in the Arctic region during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018, said Lt. Emily Motz, ICEX 2018 METOC officer." #ICEX #OnSceneUnseen #Arctic #submarines

03/06/2018
Grace Hopper - Nanoseconds

Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT): A branch that falls under the Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy in its role as Navigator of the Navy. PNT ensures naval forces have state-of-the-practice positioning, navigation and timing capabilities for accurate operational maneuver and optimum weapons employment, enabling a competitive advantage across the full spectrum of naval and joint warfare. Longer story made shorter, time, yes time all that way down to nanoseconds, is crucial to ensuring PNT. The United States Naval Observatory is responsible for determining precise time, which is crucial for accurate navigation and the support of communications on Earth and in Space.

Check out this video where the late Rear Adm. Grace Hopper explains nanoseconds using a piece of wire.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEpsKnWZrJ8

Grace Hopper explains Nanoseconds. Please Subscribe! :) Thanks!

"Our talented workforce is the center of gravity of Naval Oceanography and is essential in providing the Navy our nation...
02/27/2018
Oceanographer of the Navy Congratulates 2017 Naval Oceanography Award Recipients

"Our talented workforce is the center of gravity of Naval Oceanography and is essential in providing the Navy our nation needs. It's an honor to recognize the hard work and dedication of this year's awardees." -- Oceanographer of the Navy Rear Adm. John Okon

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=104511

Oceanographer of the Navy Rear Adm. John Okon congratulates the recipients of the 2017 Naval Oceanography Awards.

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The Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy is responsible for providing Naval leadership on issues related to oceanography, meteorology, hydrography, precise time, climate change, the Arctic, geospatial and celestial referencing. The office is led by Oceanographer of the Navy, Rear Adm. John Okon whose role also includes navigator and hydrographer of the Navy as well as the senior policy advisor for issues related to national ocean policy and governance. The office's roles under Navigator of the Navy includes providing policy and requirements guidance to ensure naval forces have state-of-the-practice positioning, navigation and timing capabilities for accurate operational maneuver and optimum weapons employment, enabling a competitive advantage across the full spectrum of naval and joint warfare. The Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy has five branches. They are: -- Task Force Ocean -- Task Force Climate Change -- Positioning, Navigation and Timing -- Naval Deputy to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration -- Oceanography Capabilities and Requirements

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Dangerous Philippine Navy Frigate. BRP Jose Rizal Class
The mechanism of the formation of floods. Faculty of Geography, MSU. https://vk.com/club5535 The waters of the lakes, seas and oceans of the northern hemisphere rotate counterclockwise, and the waters of the southern hemisphere rotate clockwise, forming cyclonic gyres. The main cause of rotation of gyres are local winds, flowing into the seas and oceans of the river and the deflecting force of Coriolis. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocean_gyre And the higher the speed of the winds, the higher the rotation speed of the gyres and, as a result, the centrifugal force of the gyres increases, due to which the water level of the seas and oceans increases. And the lower the rotation speed of the gyres, the lower the water level of the seas and oceans. https://youtu.be/ihM1I5r_MUg The speed of currents along the perimeter of the seas and oceans is not the same everywhere and depends on the depth of the coast. In the shallow part of the seas and oceans, the flow moves fast, and in the deep water part of the seas and oceans the flow moves slowly. Seasonal increase in the water level is observed not along the entire coast of the seas and oceans, but only on those coasts where a high angular velocity of currents and, as a result, a high centrifugal force of water. (Centrifugal force F = mv2 / r). On straight coasts where currents do not have an angular velocity, the water level does not rise. The waters of the Gulf of Finland rotate counterclockwise to form a cycle in the form of an ellipse. And when the seasonal storm winds and the flood river Neva rotate the cycle to 17 km / h, the centrifugal force of the cycle increases, so that on the east coast of the Gulf of Finland the water level rises more than 3 meters. A similar pattern of seasonal increase in water levels is observed in all lakes, seas and oceans. The average depth of the Gulf of Finland is about 50 meters, on the east coast about 5 meters, in the west of the bay about 100 meters, for this reason the linear and angular velocity of currents on the east coast of the Gulf of Finland is much higher. As far as the depth of the coast decreases, the speed of the currents increases. Flooding in St. Petersburg. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floods_in_Saint_Petersburg In the Gulf of Finland, the seasonal rise in water levels has two peaks, in August – September and in December – January and in time they coincide with the season of storm winds and the high water of the Neva River. The speed of the current in the Gulf of Finland reaches 17 km / h, and the maximum speed of the current on Earth reaches 30 km / h, the wind speed is more than 100 km / h. http://goo.gl/eYVTo6 http://tapemark.narod.ru/more/09.html The waters of the North Sea rotate counterclockwise, forming a huge circulation. And when seasonal storm winds rotate the cycle, more than 20 km / h (on the southern coast), the centrifugal force of the cycle increases, so that, on the southern coast of the North Sea, the water level rises more than 5 meters. (The storm surge is more than 2.5 meters, the centrifugal surge is more than 2.5 meters and the tidal wave is more than 5 meters). North Sea Flood 1953. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Sea_flood_of_1953 https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datei:North_Sea_Currents.svg The waters of the Caspian Sea rotate counterclockwise forming a circulation in the form of an ellipse. And when the flood river Volga rotates the circulation, more than 10 km / hour, the centrifugal force of circulation increases, so that, on the northern coast of the Caspian Sea, the water level rises more than 1 meter. The average depth of the Caspian Sea is about 200 meters, on the north coast about 5 meters, on the south coast about 500m. For this reason, the linear and angular velocity of the currents on the northern coast of the Caspian Sea is much higher. In the Caspian Sea, the peak of the seasonal water level increase is observed in June-August and coincides in time with the flood of the Volga River. During a drought over the Volga River basin, the water level in the north of the Caspian does not rise. http://tapemark.narod.ru/more/06.png https://bigenc.ru/geography/text/2050560 In the Bay of Bengal, in the season of monsoon winds and floods of the Ganges River, the speed of the gyre increases over 10 km / h, due to which the seasonal increase in water levels exceeds 15 meters. (The storm surge is more than 2.5 meters, the centrifugal surge is more than 2.5 meters and the tidal wave is more than 10 meters). Bay of Bengal flood 1970. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_Bhola_cyclone The seasonal increase in the level of the Black Sea (up to 40 cm) is most pronounced in the southeastern part of the sea, where in summer the angular velocity of the currents along the coast reaches its maximum value. http://tapemark.narod.ru/more/07.html The height of the floods depends not so much on the speed and direction of the wind, but on the speed of rotation of the rotation, due to which centrifugal surge and abnormally high tides are formed. For this reason, on different coasts with the same wind speed, the height of floods varies. A storm surge of great height in the Northern Dvina River may also form under the influence of the north wind. http://tapemark.narod.ru/more/22.png https://vestnik5.geogr.msu.ru/jour/article/view/11?locale=ru_RU If, during a storm, flood rivers that flow into the bay do not create a whirlpool, or a gale wind moves against the whirlwind, then flooding does not form and is easy to predict. The assumption that the cause of the seasonal rise in the water level may be the pressure of the atmosphere, the flow of the rivers, the temperature difference and the salinity of the waters do not hold water, these factors may raise the water level by a few cm, but no more. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annual_cycle_of_sea_level_height https://research.csiro.au/slrwavescoast/sea-level/sea-level-change/ http://www.okeanavt.ru/tainiokeana/1066mifosrednemurovne.html The presented theory can be easily verified by relating the velocity of the currents to the level of the seas and oceans. (Based on a map of depths and currents, seas and oceans). Real-time sea current speed http://portal.esimo.ru/portal https://www.ndbc.noaa.gov http://fermi.jhuapl.edu/sat_ocean.html If during the flood in St. Petersburg, to direct the flow of the Neva River against the flow of waters of the Gulf of Finland, by building canals and floodgates, you can significantly reduce the increase in water levels on the east coast of the Gulf of Finland. Dear Climatologists! I propose to use the theory presented for weather forecasting in seas and oceans. If you have any questions, you can contact the editors of the journals or the author. The discovery was published in the Russian-German scientific peer-reviewed journal “Eastern European Scientific Journal” No. 3/2015. Page 64. June http://www.auris-archiv.de/journal.html Scientific journal "NBICS-Science. Technologies" No. 4/2018. Page 104. (Nanotechnology Society of Russia) http://www.nanonewsnet.ru/news/2018/vyshel-chetvertyi-nomer-zhurnala-nbiks-naukatekhnologii Continued: The mechanism of the vertical circulation of the waters of the oceans. Forum Federal target program "World Ocean" http://okeany.com/forum/784.htm Forum Akademgorodok https://forum.academ.club/index.php?showtopic=1080971 French Maritime Forum (Discussion). http://forummarine.forumactif.com/t9357-le-flux-et-reflux-est-le-resultat-de-la-rotation-de-la-terre English forum. "Weather/Earth sciences" https://www.wxforum.net/index.php?topic=35094.0 German Maritime Forum https://www.forum-marinearchiv.de/smf/index.php?topic=31488.0
The first IEEE Research and Applications of Photonics In Defense Conference (RAPID) to be held in 2018 in the Heart of Florida’s Emerald Coast on the Gulf of Mexico! https://ieee-rapid.org/ Paper submission deadline approaching: 26 March 2018 The IEEE RAPID conference aims to bring together government, academia and industry in a global forum to present new fundamental basic research, innovative technologies and build collaborations to solve critical security and defense challenges. This international conference will be broad in scope covering such areas as electromagnetics, device physics, optics and photonics, algorithms, and test and evaluation to name a few.