National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers

National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers The National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers is a national non-profit organization representing State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs).

To assure that every state would have a say in our nation's historic preservation program, and to assure there were no "top-down" decisions allowing federal projects to destroy our heritage without any consideration, the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 laid the groundwork for the designation of a State Historic Preservation Officer for each state. To give them a collective voice, and to

To assure that every state would have a say in our nation's historic preservation program, and to assure there were no "top-down" decisions allowing federal projects to destroy our heritage without any consideration, the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 laid the groundwork for the designation of a State Historic Preservation Officer for each state. To give them a collective voice, and to

07/01/2021

Breaking News - the INVEST in America Act, the House Transportation/Infrastructure Bill (HR 3684) that was passed this morning included an Amendment by Rep. Teresa Leger Fernandez that permanently reauthorizes the Historic Preservation Fund and increases the annual deposits to $300 million. There is still a lot of work ahead to try to reconcile the House and Senate bills, so success is not guaranteed. We will keep you posted about what you can do to help! Thank you, Rep. Teresa Leger Fernandez for your leadership!

Earlier this month, volunteers cleaned up the historic Hatfield Cemetery in Sarah Ann, West Virginia. Among the voluntee...
06/21/2021
Volunteers, including McCoy descendants, help clean up Hatfield Cemetery at Sarah Ann

Earlier this month, volunteers cleaned up the historic Hatfield Cemetery in Sarah Ann, West Virginia. Among the volunteers were descendants of the McCoys, the family the Hatfields once infamously feuded with. The earliest burial dates to 1898, and is the grave of Captain S. Hatfield (1891–1898). The cemetery features the grave and monument with a life-size statue of Captain Anderson "Devil Anse" Hatfield, erected in 1926. The cemetery was listed in the @National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 1980. "Most of us who live here realize the power and importance of our regional history,” Brandon Kirk, a local author, historian and an associate professor of history at Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College aid to a reporter with The Logan Banner. “Many of us are collaborating and networking and brainstorming how to process, package and promote this history for today and tomorrow, for both locals and visitors. It’s important that we tell our story while partnering with others to bring it forward." Kirk also noted that historic preservation is also important for economic development.
https://www.loganbanner.com/news/volunteers-including-mccoy-descendants-help-clean-up-hatfield-cemetery-at-sarah-ann/article_035067de-977e-5c8c-a9ea-62163fef9536.html

SARAH ANN — The historic Hatfield Cemetery at Sarah Ann received a big touchup Saturday morning and afternoon thanks to several volunteers — some of whom included descendants of the

The Stone Avenue Underpass Pump House in Tucson, Arizona, which was built in 1936, is for sale to a buyer who has the re...
06/21/2021
Road Runner: Historic downtown Tucson building for sale to buyer willing to move it

The Stone Avenue Underpass Pump House in Tucson, Arizona, which was built in 1936, is for sale to a buyer who has the resources to move it. The pump house is a contributing property in the Warehouse Historic District, which was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 1999. It is being removed to make way for a new bicycle and pedestrian bridge. Listing in the National Register does not prevent the moving or destruction of historic properties. The Arizona State Historic Preservation Office - SHPO and other SHPOs work with federal agencies and local communities to determine if federally funded or permitted project will have an adverse impact on historic resources. If it is determined that it will have an adverse effect, then an effort is made to mitigate that effect.
https://tucson.com/news/local/road-runner-historic-downtown-tucson-building-for-sale-to-buyer-willing-to-move-it/article_730529c6-c4b8-11eb-93dd-0ffdee0284e1.html

The Stone Avenue Underpass Pump House is available for a “serious buyer” who can pay all costs associated with removing it from the corner of Stone Avenue and Sixth Street.

The Telegraph recently highlighted the Benjamin Godfrey Memorial Chapel in @Godfrey, Illinois. Built in 1854, in part by...
06/20/2021
Godfrey Memorial Chapel's story continues through music

The Telegraph recently highlighted the Benjamin Godfrey Memorial Chapel in @Godfrey, Illinois. Built in 1854, in part by the town’s namesake, Benjamin Godfrey, and mostly by W.H. Howell, the chapel became an immediate staple for those attending Monticello Women’s Seminary — better known today as Lewis and Clark Community College. “This was named one of the six most authentic copies of New England church architecture beyond the northeastern United States,” Greg Cash, a campus historian, said to a reporter. “You don’t see this style building, even in historic churches, in this area very much.” The chapel was listed in the @nNational Register of Historic Places - NPS in 1979 and moved in 1980. “The mover put a cup of water on the windowsill and promised that not a drop would be spilled in the process — and he was correct,” Cash said about the chapel’s delicate relocation efforts.
https://www.thetelegraph.com/news/article/Godfrey-Memorial-Chapel-s-story-continues-16210585.php

Built in 1854, in part by the town’s namesake, Benjamin Godfrey, and mostly by W.H....

The Prayer Mission of God in Christ Church in Winter Park, Florida, has been placed on Winter Park’s Register of Histori...
06/20/2021
Winter Park church designated historic ‘beacon’ for Hannibal Square community

The Prayer Mission of God in Christ Church in Winter Park, Florida, has been placed on Winter Park’s Register of Historic Places. Prayer Mission of God in Christ Church was built in 1945, a tiny 962-square-foot structure nestled in the community that once housed more than 20 churches within one-third square mile. “It’s not that the building itself is remarkable architecturally – it’s the importance of churches in the history and heritage of the Hannibal Square neighborhood,” city planner Jeff Briggs said to a reporter with the Orlando Sentinel. Recognition of historic resources by local governments play an important role in preserving historic buildings.
https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/orange-county/os-ne-winter-park-church-historic-designation-20210528-m7qxh72p2ng2noaklh5gaovl6y-story.html

For residents of Winter Park’s historic Black neighborhood, Prayer Mission of God in Christ Church is a community hub that holds memories of sermons by the late Rev. Jerry Hall, who died in 2008.

Lenora McQueen and others are working to preserve what is left of the Shockoe Hill African Burial Ground in Richmond. Wh...
06/19/2021
Woman wants to memorialize unmarked African burial ground

Lenora McQueen and others are working to preserve what is left of the Shockoe Hill African Burial Ground in Richmond. While the Shockoe Hill and Hebrew cemeteries across the street from the Shockoe Hill African Burial Ground are still part of the landscape and listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS, the Shockoe Hill African Burial Ground is home to a n abandoned, graffiti-covered Sunoco station and a set of billboards overlooking Interstate 64. The city systematically erased the segregated resting place where historians estimate that more than 20,000 freed and enslaved Black people were buried. The Shockoe Hill African Burying Ground was established in 1816. It was the segregated part of the Shockoe Hill Burying Ground,, a municipal burying ground owned and operated by the City of Richmond. This year, Preservation Virginia named the Shockoe Hill African Burying Ground, one of Virginia's Most Endangered Historic Places. McQueen and others are working to nominate the cemetery, which is also known as the Second African Burial Ground, for listing in the National Register. “It’s a nuanced situation, because the exact boundaries of what remains of that cemetery are unknown,” Virginia SHPO Julie Langan said to a reporter. “It’s hard to know how much of that cemetery actually still survives because of all of the projects and mistreatment of it over decades. We know that it has been adversely impacted by...multiple projects. What we don’t know is what is the integrity of what’s left.” Listing would require a review of the adverse effect of a rail project on the burial ground and efforts to mitigate any adverse effects.
https://www.theintelligencer.com/news/article/Woman-wants-to-memorialize-unmarked-African-16213353.php

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Lenora McQueen came to Richmond four years ago to learn more about...

The roller coaster at Lagoon Amusement Park turns 100 year old this year. Built in 1921 and operating ever since, the Ro...
06/19/2021
‘Part of the heritage’: Lagoon’s Roller Coaster turns 100-years-old

The roller coaster at Lagoon Amusement Park turns 100 year old this year. Built in 1921 and operating ever since, the Roller Coaster in the City of Farmington, Utah is the seventh oldest roller coaster in the world and the fourth oldest in the United States. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 2012. The roller coaster was constructed by John Miller, who also built several of the iconic coasters at New York City’s Coney Island. At the time of the construction, the ride was one of the first of its kind to be placed in the Western United States. It delighted thousands of riders until a large fire in 1953 destroyed a great deal of the park’s Midway section. The Roller Coaster’s entrance and front portion were taken in the flames and were rebuilt in time for the next year’s season. The ride has been known as the Lagoon Dipper, Silver Coaster and Giant Coaster, but its current official name is simply Roller Coaster. Locals often call it the White Roller Coaster because it was painted white for several decades. Around 2004, the park stopped painting the ride as rebuilt portions were constructed using treated lumber. Since then it has gradually changed in color from white to natural brown. Utah State History and other SHPOs help preserve the places where Americans have spent their leisure time.
https://www.abc4.com/news/top-stories/part-of-the-heritage-lagoons-roller-coaster-turns-100-years-old/

FARMINGTON (ABC4) – It’s big, brown, and now 100-years-old. The iconic “Roller Coaster” at Lagoon hit the century mark this week, and, if things go as hoped at the 135-year-old Davis County amuseme…

Greg Paxton, who is retiring as the executive director of Maine Preservation, highlighted the Mayo Mill in in Dover-Foxc...
06/18/2021
Greg Paxton's Favorite Maine Place

Greg Paxton, who is retiring as the executive director of Maine Preservation, highlighted the Mayo Mill in in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine. The mill site has an industrial history dating to 1822, although the oldest surviving element of it, a foundation, dates to the 1844 mill built by James Mayo and several partners. Over the next century it went through a number of ownership changes, and the complex grew to include all of the surviving buildings by 1941. During this time the mill was one of the major employers in the region, producing woolen cloth which was carried by cart - and later truck - to the nearest railroad depot. In 2015, it was rehabilitated and transformed into a mixed-use complex with residential space, offices, a boutique inn and a café. “Buildings, to be preserved, have to be used. So whether that’s your own house or a mill building or an abandoned school, it’s often a question of finding contemporary uses while bringing along as much of the well-built historic fabric as possible.”” Paxton said to a reporter with Down East Magazine. The Maine Historic Preservation Commission and other SHPOs work with organization like Preservation Maine and communities on adaptive reuse projects.
The Mill Event Space
https://downeast.com/our-towns/greg-paxton-favorite-maine-place/

Maine Preservation's outgoing executive director on the Mayo Mill in Dover-Foxcroft.

Developer Chris Rhoades of T.T. Maine Venture LLC wants to convert the 14-story Time & Temperature Building in downtown ...
06/18/2021
Developer wants to convert historic Portland building into luxury hotel and bar

Developer Chris Rhoades of T.T. Maine Venture LLC wants to convert the 14-story Time & Temperature Building in downtown Portland, Maine, into a 186 room hotel, with a three-season rooftop bar, meeting and banquet spaces, retail shops and a restaurant. The Time and Temperature Building, originally known as the Chapman Building, and officially 477 Congress Street, is a fourteen-story office building in downtown Portland, Maine. The building is named after a large three-sided four-element eggcrate display screen on the roof that flashes the local time and temperature. It was built in 1924 as a twelve-story building, with Maine's first indoor shopping center on its ground floor. The time and temperature sign was added to the building in 1964. In the 1970s, the Portland Savings Bank ran a summertime competition where the winner was the person who correctly guessed when the sign would first register a temperature of 90 degrees Fahrenheit. The project aims to restore historic finishes throughout the complex and developers have been working with historic preservation consultants as well as the Maine Historical Society during the drafting stages.
Visit Portland Maine
https://bangordailynews.com/2021/06/02/news/portland/developer-wants-to-convert-historic-portland-building-into-luxury-hotel-and-bar/

Developer Chris Rhoades wants to convert the 14-story Times & Temperature Building into a 186 room hotel with rooftop bar.

The former J.J. Jones High School in Mount Airy, North Carolina, which served African-American students during segregati...
06/18/2021

The former J.J. Jones High School in Mount Airy, North Carolina, which served African-American students during segregation has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS. The school was named for John Jarvis Jones, a pioneering African-American educator who moved to Mount Airy in 1914. Jones and his family would establish an educational legacy that served generations of students. The campus that would bear his name, located on Jones School Road in the northern part of the city, opened in 1936. It bid farewell to a final high school graduating class in 1966 — corresponding with the desegregation of public schools in Surry County, NC. Leonidas Harold “L.H.” Jones, son of J.J. Jones, was the only principal of Jones High during its 30 years of operation. The former high school later served both white and African-American elementary pupils until the mid-1990s, when a new J.J. Jones campus opened on Riverside Drive. It is attended by the city’s intermediate students. The North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office and other SHPOs help preserve the schools that tell the stories of communities throughout America.

The former J.J. Jones High School in Mount Airy, North Carolina, which served African-American students during segregation has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS. The school was named for John Jarvis Jones, a pioneering African-American educator who moved to Mount Airy in 1914. Jones and his family would establish an educational legacy that served generations of students. The campus that would bear his name, located on Jones School Road in the northern part of the city, opened in 1936. It bid farewell to a final high school graduating class in 1966 — corresponding with the desegregation of public schools in Surry County, NC. Leonidas Harold “L.H.” Jones, son of J.J. Jones, was the only principal of Jones High during its 30 years of operation. The former high school later served both white and African-American elementary pupils until the mid-1990s, when a new J.J. Jones campus opened on Riverside Drive. It is attended by the city’s intermediate students. The North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office and other SHPOs help preserve the schools that tell the stories of communities throughout America.

A Black midwife’s southwest Georgia home is on the National Trust for Historic Preservationn’s 2021 list of “America’s 1...
06/17/2021
Black midwife’s southwest Georgia home makes national list of endangered historic places - SaportaReport

A Black midwife’s southwest Georgia home is on the National Trust for Historic Preservationn’s 2021 list of “America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.” The Georgia B. Williams Nursing Home in Camilla, Georgia, was used for “nursing” in the sense of caring for mothers and newborns. It was operated by Beatrice “Ms. Bea” Borders (1892-1971), who cared for Black women in the era of Jim Crow racism and segregation. She is estimated to have delivered more than 6,000 babies between 1945 and 1971, and may have been midwifing as early as 1918. Borders worked with her mother — for whom the home was named — and her grandmother. After Borders’ death in 1971, the state closed the facility, which then became a daycare center for decades. Today, the building is vacant and has water damage and other problems. Local advocates got the property listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 2011, citing its significance to Black, women’s and commercial history. Now a local nonprofit, the Georgia B Williams Restoration Project, aims to preserve and reuse it as a museum and educational center, and hopes to offer scholarships to women studying midwifery and childcare. The Georgia Historic Preservation Division and other SHPOs work with non-profits to help preserve the historic buildings that tell the story of America.
City of Camilla
https://saportareport.com/black-midwifes-southwest-georgia-home-makes-national-list-of-endangered-historic-places/sections/reports/johnruch/

Read Black midwife’s southwest Georgia home makes national list of endangered historic places by John Ruch for SaportaReport here.

The New York Times highlighted the adaptive reuse project that ha transformed Rocky Mount Mills in Rocky Mount, North Ca...
06/17/2021
A Second Life for North Carolina’s Shuttered Factories

The New York Times highlighted the adaptive reuse project that ha transformed Rocky Mount Mills in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. The Mill is the second cotton mill constructed in the state of North Carolina, dating back to 1816. Capitol Broadcasting Company bought the 150-acre mills in the 2007 and has since redeveloped it into a mixed-use campus of breweries, restaurants, lofts, office, and event space. When it was established, the Mill's workforce was composed of African-Americans, most of who were slaves. The mill was a major supplier of cotton yarn to the United States Army during World War II. The Mills were listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. The general decline in the southern textile industry beginning in the 1970s eventually impacted Rocky Mount Mills, and the mill closed its doors in 1996. The story also highlights several other adaptive reuse projects in North Carolina. “What they have going for them is this authenticity of place, and the history and heritage surrounding that,” Donald K. Carter, a senior research fellow at Carnegie Mellon University’s Remaking Cities Institute, said to a reporter in reference to the industrial buildings from the 19th and early 20th centuries. As a result, he added, “almost every city is now looking at these buildings as real economic development assets.” The North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office and other SHPOs help preserve historic industrial buildings that can till serve communities throughout America.
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/15/business/north-carolina-factories-redevelopment.html?searchResultPosition=1

With the rise of remote work, developers are betting they can lure young talent and raise economic prospects for the state’s depressed areas.

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This Monday, we would like to welcome Hannah Thomas to her first day working as a Preservation Planner for NPS ABPP! For the last 6 months, Hannah has worked as a Historic Preservation Specialist for ABPP through a cooperative agreement with the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers. In her new position, she will be developing grant procedures, coordinating compliance requirements, and assisting applicants interested in ABPP’s Battlefield Land Acquisition, Battlefield Interpretation, and Battlefield Restoration Grants. Growing up by Valley Forge National Historical Park, Hannah has always had a love of historic landscapes. She translated this into a career by earning a Bachelor’s of Landscape Architecture, with a Minor in History from the Pennsylvania State University, and a Master’s degree in Cultural Landscapes from the University of Edinburgh. Welcome to your new position Hannah, we are thrilled to have you on our team! Want to learn more about the grants Hannah will be working with? Check out our website: https://go.nps.gov/abpp 📸Image: Hannah during a recent visit to Longfellow House - Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site
In February 2020, the Tri-Township school board made a surprise announcement that they were proposing to close LaCrosse High School. Superintendent Kelly Shepherd has been using skewed numbers and outright lies to try to convince the community members that closing hour historic high school, the anchor of our community and the pride of the town, is the most cost-effective solution and the only way to secure a future for the Tri-Township school district. Please take a moment to check out our story about the amazing grassroot efforts and local investigative journalism in the fight to save LaCrosse High School.
The wildfires in California are devastating so much of the state. Among the hard hit places is California's first state park, Big Basin, which lost its National Register listed historic buildings among a grove of ancient coastal redwoods.
**Help Support the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery Mariners Memorial Campaign** @SSHMarinersGenealogy https://www.facebook.com/SSHMarinersGenealogy/ The Descendants of Sailors’ Snug Harbor Mariners have been reaching out to Historical and Genealogical Societies, Museums, Military Veterans Groups, and Concerned Citizens, to invite them to join a Letters of Support Campaign to support their efforts to gain access to the old Sailors’ Snug Harbor Cemetery on Staten Island, in New York City, to honor their Ancestors and all of the 6,500 Merchant, Coast Guard, and Naval Mariners interred there (1834-1976), by installing a Memorial Monument (Obelisk) and holding an annual Memorial Service. Some of the Mariners were famous Sea Captains and some sailed on famous Merchant, Coast Guard, and Naval ships dating back to the American Revolution. Many were just average seamen whom sailed and endured for many years on the sea under arduous conditions. The Mariners were from many areas of the United States, Canada, and other countries. https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/2244490/sailors-snug-harbor-cemetery Sadly, the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery is devoid of gravestones or markers, except for 15 remaining gravestones. The Cemetery is closed and not open to the public. The Board of Trustees of Sailors' Snug Harbor have rejected the Descendants' requests to access the SSH Cemetery to honor their Ancestors. https://nypost.com/2018/12/29/caretakers-shoot-down-plans-for-monument-for-fallen-sailors/ The Descendants are collecting Letters of Support to persuade the Trustees of Sailors’ Snug Harbor to change their decision. You can help support the Descendants by writing a Letter of Support using the Support Letter Writing Instructions at the following link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sZv5VFLNWw0HA-pW2i33RhbgVFQ6oExx Sailors’ Snug Harbor has a very interesting history. It was one of the first large scale retirement facilities in the United States and the first established for Merchant Mariners. It was founded by the Randall family whom were New York City Merchant Sea Captains and Privateers during the French Indian War and Patriots during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Hamilton was a friend of the Randall family and their Attorney. He helped draft the Robert Richard Randall Will in 1801 to create the SSH Trust which funded the SSH Retirement Home. During its 140+ years of operation (1833-1976) approximately 16,000 Mariners resided there. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailors%27_Snug_Harbor
My wife and I are managers of this amazing property that is for sale in Hancock, MI. We are looking for people with experience, passion, and resources to take the helm. If you know someone who might be interested in buying and rehabilitating the house, please share our info:
I thought your group might enjoy this edible version of perhaps Kentucky's best historic preservation project of 2018:
Please visit website of Wikimedia:- File:American shelf wall clock.jpg. It is 167 years old rarest antique of America which is safe with me in good condition at Kathmandu. If the concerned sector of USA want to collect it back, welcome. It worth five million US$. Contact: 977-9803037266