National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers

National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers The National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers is a national non-profit organization representing State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs).
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To assure that every state would have a say in our nation's historic preservation program, and to assure there were no "top-down" decisions allowing federal projects to destroy our heritage without any consideration, the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 laid the groundwork for the designation of a State Historic Preservation Officer for each state. To give them a collective voice, and to assure that our nation's historic preservation program is responsive to changing needs based upon daily experience, the NCSHPO regularly works with federal agencies and national organizations in Washington, DC.

To assure that every state would have a say in our nation's historic preservation program, and to assure there were no "top-down" decisions allowing federal projects to destroy our heritage without any consideration, the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 laid the groundwork for the designation of a State Historic Preservation Officer for each state. To give them a collective voice, and to assure that our nation's historic preservation program is responsive to changing needs based upon daily experience, the NCSHPO regularly works with federal agencies and national organizations in Washington, DC.

Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel (CABI) synagogue in Boise, Idaho, was built in 1895 and is among the oldest synagogues ...
11/06/2020

Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel (CABI) synagogue in Boise, Idaho, was built in 1895 and is among the oldest synagogues in continuous use west of the Mississippi River. Boise's first Jews were present in the mining camps in the 1860s, but it was not until 1895 that a Congregation Beth Israel was formed. Most of the congregants were from Germany and Central Europe and the synagogue followed Reformed ritual. Moses Alexander, mayor of Boise and governor of Idaho, was an early leader of the congregation. Congregation Ahavath Israel was founded in 1912 by Orthodox immigrants from Eastern Europe. The two congregations merged in 1986 to become Ahavath Beth Israel. The wood-shingled synagogue, which opened in 1896, blends two architecture styles popular with turn-of-the-century Jewish congregations: the Rundbogenstil and the Moorish Revival styles. The synagogue was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 1971. In 2003, it was moved from its original location on State Street to its current location on Latah Street. The Idaho State Historic Preservation Office and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members help preserve sacred buildings that tell the stories of communities throughout America.

Last month, a ceremony was held to celebrate the listing of the former Gillette Wyoming City Hall in the National Regist...
11/06/2020

Last month, a ceremony was held to celebrate the listing of the former Gillette Wyoming City Hall in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS. The building served as Gillette's second city hall and has been home to K² Technologies since 2010. The Art Deco building was constructed in 1936. In 1967, an addition was built for the fire department. The Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members work with communities to help preserve historic buildings that tell their story and continue to serve those communities.
City of Gillette (Government) Visit Gillette-Wright Wyoming

The boyhood home of Nathaniel Hawthorrne, the author of The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables, is at risk...
11/06/2020
Funding needed to save Nathaniel Hawthorne’s boyhood home in Raymond

The boyhood home of Nathaniel Hawthorrne, the author of The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables, is at risk of serious structural damage if major repairs are not made soon. Hawthorne lived in the house house in Raymond, Maine, with his mother and two sisters from the time he was about 9 or 10 until he graduated from Bowdoin College in 1825. His father, a sea captain out of Salem, Mass., who died of yellow fever in Dutch Suriname when Hawthorne was a small child. Hawthorne's mother's brother, Richard Manning, who had already built himself a house and owned a great deal of land in the area, built this house for his sister around 1813. After Hawthorne graduated from college his family left Raymond and returned to Salem, both because of his mother’s poor health and the difficulty of life in what was then a frontier area. The house was unoccupied for some years but was eventually resurrected as a boarding house and tavern called “Colonel Scribner’s Tavern.” In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s saw the house fall into great disrepair until 1921 when some of the summer residents of this area banded together to raise funds to save the house through the formation of the Hawthorne Community Association. The association has survived to this day and is leading the effort to raise $75,000 to make critical repairs to the house’s foundation and structural support, roof, and siding. The house was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 1969. Hawthorne said of his years in Maine: "Those were delightful days, for that part of the country was wild then, with only scattered clearings, and nine tenths of it primeval woods." The Maine Historic Preservation Commission and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members are committed to preserving the historic resources associated with America's greatest authors.
https://www.hawthorneassoc.com
Town of Raymond, Maine
https://www.centralmaine.com/2020/10/01/funding-needed-to-save-nathaniel-hawthornes-boyhood-home-in-raymond/

The boyhood home of the legendary author of The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables in Raymond — known with great affection by locals as “the

Efforts are underway to list the Travis Heights neighborhood in South Austin, Texas, in the National Register of Histori...
11/05/2020
Austin’s Travis Heights Neighborhood Headed For National Historic Status

Efforts are underway to list the Travis Heights neighborhood in South Austin, Texas, in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS. In September, he Texas Historical Commission’s State Board of Review unanimously approved the 353-acre district’s nomination to the National Register. The area now called Travis Heights by the majority of Austinites is actually a collection of three neighborhoods developed over time, starting with the section known as Swisher’s Addition which was first platted in 1877, then Fairview Park platted in 1886, and finally Travis Heights platted in 1913. The Texas Historical Commission and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members work with communities to help preserve the historic resources that tell their story.
Travis Heights Neighborhood
https://austin.towers.net/austins-travis-heights-neighborhood-headed-for-national-historic-status/

The Travis Heights neighborhood of South Austin, one of the city’s more notable concentrations of historic domestic architecture, could attain its long-sought admission to the National Regist…

The Giant City Stone Fort Site is one of eleven mysterious stone forts that are spread across Southern Illinois. It is b...
11/05/2020

The Giant City Stone Fort Site is one of eleven mysterious stone forts that are spread across Southern Illinois. It is believed that it was constructed and used in the period from c. AD 600–900. There are all kinds of theories revolving around why this stone fort was built, but no one really knows why it was built. "That's what makes this site so special, that no one really knows why late Woodland Native Americans built it," Giant City State Park Natural Resources Coordinator Jennifer Randolph said to a reporter with WSIL TV 3. "Three-hundred tons of rock up here, and the rocks weigh between 50 and 100 pounds each. One man could've carried one rock. All of the rocks that were initially put up here and, well, all of these are from the creeks down in the park. They were carried up that long narrow passageway to be put up here." The original stone wall of the fort was dismantled by European settlers in the region, who used the stone as a building material; the stone base is all that remains of the original wall. In 1934, the Civilian Conservation Corps reconstructed the wall. The first professional archaeological investigations of the site were conducted in 1956 by archaeologists from Southern Illinois University Carbondale while the first in-depth survey of the site took place in 2000–2001. The site, which is accessible to park visitors via a nature trail, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 2002. The Historic Preservation Division, Illinois Department of Natural Resources and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members help preserve sites associated with America's indigenous people.
Friends of Giant City State Park

The rehabilitation of the former Texarkana National Bank downtown is progressing through the initial phases of planning ...
11/05/2020
WATCH | Texarkana National Bank rehab project progressing

The rehabilitation of the former Texarkana National Bank downtown is progressing through the initial phases of planning and hazardous materials removal. Developer David Peavy plans to transform the art deco style building into more than 60 apartments, retail space and shared work-living space. He is aiming to list the building in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS and use state and federal historic tax credits to offset the cost of the adaptive reuse project. In order to do that, Peavy first has to remove the pebbled stone panels covering the building's original red brick masonry. Made of red brick with classical-style ornamentation, the eight-story Texarkana National Bank was built around 1914. Originally tall and narrow, the bank doubled its available rental space in the 1920s by expanding to the west. Around 1970, an attempt to modernize the building's look encased it in white aluminum, stucco and marble. Texarkana National Bank remained the building's prime occupant between 1920 and 1997. Doctors, lawyers, dentists, architects, investment firms and construction companies also operated in the building. Texarkana National Bank's departure in 1997 led to a mass tenant exodus from the building between 1997 and 2004. The Texas Historical Commission and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members administer state and federal historic tax credits that help preserve historic resources and strengthen local economies.
The City of Texarkana, Texas
https://www.texarkanagazette.com/news/texarkana/story/2020/oct/01/texarkana-national-bank-rehab-project-progressing/843609/

The rehabilitation of the former Texarkana National Bank downtown is progressing through the initial phases of planning and hazardous materials removal, but much work remains before developer David Peavy's vision for the building will be realized.

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, The Egyptian Theatre in Boise, Idaho, has canceled all events through January of 20...
11/04/2020
You asked: Why is the Egyptian Theater boarded up?

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, The Egyptian Theatre in Boise, Idaho, has canceled all events through January of 2021. The owners of the theater are using the break in performances to do some maintenance work – leading to that plywood over the entrance. Crews painted and repaired the doors to the building. Conveniently, they cut a peephole in the wood so passers-by can see the work. The theater, which opened in1927, is the oldest theatre in Boise. The theater's architecture is of the Egyptian revival style, inspired by the newly-discovered tomb of King Tut. Over time, the structure underwent various changes. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 1974. It survived the wrecking ball in the 1970s. Boise’s urban renewal agency, in pursuit of a doomed plan to build a downtown Boise mall, planned to rip down the building. It removed scores of historic buildings in the downtown core over the year. But for the Egyptian, local resident Earl Hardy stepped in to buy the theater – just 30 days before its date with the wrecking ball. The Hardy family still owns the building through its foundation. The Idaho State Historic Preservation Office and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members work with communities and property owners to help preserve historic resources that tell the stories of communities and strengthen local economies.
Boise City Department of Arts and History
Boise Metro Chamber
https://boisedev.com/news/2020/09/30/egyptian-theater-boise/

If you’ve driven through Downtown Boise lately you might have noticed that the doors to the Egyptian Theater are boarded up. The classic theater first popped up in 1927, and remains one of the longest-standing buildings in Downtown Boise. It survived the wrecking ball in the 1970s, and currently e...

The Mill at Mississippi State University now has two markers at its main entrances signaling the building’s listing in t...
11/04/2020

The Mill at Mississippi State University now has two markers at its main entrances signaling the building’s listing in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS. Officials from the university and the National Park Service were on hand to unveil the new plaques on Sept. 30th. The repurposed building has been listed in the National Register since 1975. “Each time I step into this historic building, it is a pleasure to know our university and community have worked to preserve a special piece of history that is now being utilized as an economic development hub as we lead into the future,” MSU President Mark E. Keenum, who also serves on the board of trustees of the Mississippi Department of Archives & History, said. The historic John M. Stone Cotton Mill, formerly known as Mississippi State’s E.E. Cooley Building, began its transformation into a state-of-the-art conference and meeting complex with a 2014 groundbreaking. The collaborative effort involved public and private stakeholders, including Mark Castleberry of Castle Properties who led development. The MDAH Historic Preservation Division and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members work with universities and developers to help preserve and historic resources that tell the story of America and strengthen local economies.

Iowa is one of eight states that received a federal grant that helps rural communities preserve heritage and foster econ...
11/04/2020

Iowa is one of eight states that received a federal grant that helps rural communities preserve heritage and foster economic development through revitalization of historic properties. Iowa’s State Historic Preservation Office received $600,000 in Paul Bruhn Historic Revitalization Grants to provide subgrants to historic preservation projects in Iowa. Eligible properties must be listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS. These subgrants can help communities like Elkader, Iowa, preserve their historic buildings while also strengthening their local economies. Elkader, which is the seat of Clayton County, has a population of 1,273 according to the 2010 census. The Elkader Downtown Historic District was listed in the National Register in 2012. The State Historical Society of Iowa and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members are committed to preserving historic resources in rural communities throughout America.
Main Street Elkader Elkader Area Chamber of Commerce City of Elkader Clayton County Iowa

Visitors to Zion National Park are now able to access the entire Emerald Pool Trails Complex for the first time since he...
11/03/2020
Zion’s entire historic, scenic Emerald Pools Trails Complex reopens after decade of closure

Visitors to Zion National Park are now able to access the entire Emerald Pool Trails Complex for the first time since heavy rains caused massive mudslides in 2010 that made the Middle Emerald Pools Trail impassable. Visitors were already able to access the complex's lower and upper sections prior to this week, but the full route had been closed off since December 2010. The reopening comes after crews were able to complete an extensive project to restore the historic and scenic trail complex with the help of public and private funding. The Emerald Pools Trail begins at the Zion National Park Lodge westward to Lower Emerald Pool Zion National Park. Built in 1932, it was created using only hand tools. An extension built the same year runs to the Grotto Campground. The first section required the construction of stone steps to a high standard of design and finish. Repairs to the stonework were carried out in 1969. The 2.2-mile trail was individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 1987. Utah State History and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members work with federal partners to help preserve historic trails.
https://www.ksl.com/article/50021141/zions-entire-historic-scenic-emerald-pools-trails-complex-reopens-after-decade-of-closure

Zion National Park visitors are now able to access the entire Emerald Pool Trails Complex for the first time since heavy rains caused massive mudslides in 2010 that made the Middle Emerald Pools Trail impassable.

An iconic home in North Portland, Oregon, was recently listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS. The hom...
11/03/2020
Darcelle's Portland home, built in 1896, now on Oregon Register of Historic Places

An iconic home in North Portland, Oregon, was recently listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS. The home, which was built in 1896, is owned by, Darcelle, the oldest working drag queen in the world. He and his partner bought the house in the 1970's and they've been filling it with keepsakes, gifts, and memories ever since. “We used to do charity dinners. And they'd walk around, the ladies would walk around, and they'd say ‘Who dusts all this?’ That's all they cared about, who cleans, who dusts all this,” Darcelle said to a reporter with KATU News. Efforts are underway to also have Darcelle's nightclub, Darcelle XV Showplace, listed in the National Register as well. Darcelle has run the club for over 50 years. Oregon Heritage and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members work to preserve the places that tell the stories of communities throughout America.
https://katu.com/news/local/darcelles-portland-home-built-in-1896-now-on-oregon-register-of-historic-places

PORTLAND, Ore. – An iconic home in North Portland is the newest locale to join the Oregon National Register of Historic Places, and you may recognize the owner— Darcelle, the oldest working drag queen in the world. Darcelle’s home was built in 1896. He and his partner bought the ho...

Efforts are underway to have the downtown Columbia, South Carolina, home of civil rights pioneer Modjeska Monteith Simki...
11/03/2020
National recognition sought for SC sites involved in fight to end segregation in schools

Efforts are underway to have the downtown Columbia, South Carolina, home of civil rights pioneer Modjeska Monteith Simkins added to a National Park Service historic site commemorating the 1954 “Brown v. Board of Education” Supreme Court ruling that integrated American schools. While the ruling gets its name from a lawsuit out of Kansas challenging segregation, the arguments before the nation’s high court actually consolidated five separate cases, and it was a lawsuit from South Carolina — Briggs v. Elliott, filed by Summerton, South Carolina, parents in 1950 — that made it there first. Simkins helped write the Briggs lawsuit, named for the first of 20 parents to sign it. The house, which was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 1992, was her home from 1932 until her death in 1992. “The unsung heroes of Briggs v. Elliott, and all the other plaintiffs that collectively became Brown v. Board of Education, must be remembered and memorialized to fully tell the story of how segregation ended in our nation’s public schools,” Congressman Jim Clyburn said last month. The South Carolina Department of Archives and History and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members are committed to working with communities to help preserve the places that tell the story of desegregation.
https://www.postandcourier.com/columbia/national-recognition-sought-for-sc-sites-involved-in-fight-to-end-segregation-in-schools/article_c8f96434-018e-11eb-a8f4-6b4337f1f0a9.html

Preservationists want several South Carolina historic sites added to a national Brown v. Board of Education museum in Topeka, Kansas, pointing to the critical role a Clarendon County court case

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In February 2020, the Tri-Township school board made a surprise announcement that they were proposing to close LaCrosse High School. Superintendent Kelly Shepherd has been using skewed numbers and outright lies to try to convince the community members that closing hour historic high school, the anchor of our community and the pride of the town, is the most cost-effective solution and the only way to secure a future for the Tri-Township school district. Please take a moment to check out our story about the amazing grassroot efforts and local investigative journalism in the fight to save LaCrosse High School.
The wildfires in California are devastating so much of the state. Among the hard hit places is California's first state park, Big Basin, which lost its National Register listed historic buildings among a grove of ancient coastal redwoods.
**Help Support the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery Mariners Memorial Campaign** @SSHMarinersGenealogy https://www.facebook.com/SSHMarinersGenealogy/ The Descendants of Sailors’ Snug Harbor Mariners have been reaching out to Historical and Genealogical Societies, Museums, Military Veterans Groups, and Concerned Citizens, to invite them to join a Letters of Support Campaign to support their efforts to gain access to the old Sailors’ Snug Harbor Cemetery on Staten Island, in New York City, to honor their Ancestors and all of the 6,500 Merchant, Coast Guard, and Naval Mariners interred there (1834-1976), by installing a Memorial Monument (Obelisk) and holding an annual Memorial Service. Some of the Mariners were famous Sea Captains and some sailed on famous Merchant, Coast Guard, and Naval ships dating back to the American Revolution. Many were just average seamen whom sailed and endured for many years on the sea under arduous conditions. The Mariners were from many areas of the United States, Canada, and other countries. https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/2244490/sailors-snug-harbor-cemetery Sadly, the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery is devoid of gravestones or markers, except for 15 remaining gravestones. The Cemetery is closed and not open to the public. The Board of Trustees of Sailors' Snug Harbor have rejected the Descendants' requests to access the SSH Cemetery to honor their Ancestors. https://nypost.com/2018/12/29/caretakers-shoot-down-plans-for-monument-for-fallen-sailors/ The Descendants are collecting Letters of Support to persuade the Trustees of Sailors’ Snug Harbor to change their decision. You can help support the Descendants by writing a Letter of Support using the Support Letter Writing Instructions at the following link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sZv5VFLNWw0HA-pW2i33RhbgVFQ6oExx Sailors’ Snug Harbor has a very interesting history. It was one of the first large scale retirement facilities in the United States and the first established for Merchant Mariners. It was founded by the Randall family whom were New York City Merchant Sea Captains and Privateers during the French Indian War and Patriots during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Hamilton was a friend of the Randall family and their Attorney. He helped draft the Robert Richard Randall Will in 1801 to create the SSH Trust which funded the SSH Retirement Home. During its 140+ years of operation (1833-1976) approximately 16,000 Mariners resided there. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailors%27_Snug_Harbor
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I thought your group might enjoy this edible version of perhaps Kentucky's best historic preservation project of 2018:
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