Performing Arts at the Library of Congress

Performing Arts at the Library of Congress The Library of Congress, home to one of the largest collections of music, theater, and dance-related materials in the world, supports research and performance through acquisition, preservation, concerts, public programs and commissions.
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Operating as usual

04/17/2021
New World Symphony Program II

Founded in 1987 by the legendary conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, the New World Symphony, America’s Orchestral Academy, prepares graduates of music programs for leadership roles in professional orchestras and ensembles. In their second program for the Library, these talented young musicians present a dynamic program of works by William Walton, Frederick Tillis and Antonín Dvořák.

WILLIAM WALTON
Piano Quartet in D minor

FREDERICK TILLIS
Song for Sister Hokkaido for Brass Quintet and Percussion

DVOŘÁK
Piano Quartet in E-flat major, op. 87

April 16, 1924, was the birthday of American composer, conductor, arranger, and performer Henry Mancini. The Library of ...
04/16/2021

April 16, 1924, was the birthday of American composer, conductor, arranger, and performer Henry Mancini. The Library of Congress is proud to celebrate his legacy through the preservation of the Henry Mancini Papers. Enjoy this blog post that highlights Mancini's collaborative spirit, "Symphonic Soul: The Musical Ingenuity of Henry Mancini." https://blogs.loc.gov/music/2020/10/symphonic-soul-the-musical-ingenuity-of-henry-mancini/

April 16, 1924, was the birthday of American composer, conductor, arranger, and performer Henry Mancini. The Library of Congress is proud to celebrate his legacy through the preservation of the Henry Mancini Papers. Enjoy this blog post that highlights Mancini's collaborative spirit, "Symphonic Soul: The Musical Ingenuity of Henry Mancini." https://blogs.loc.gov/music/2020/10/symphonic-soul-the-musical-ingenuity-of-henry-mancini/

Library of Congress virtual concerts, including the recent "MET Orchestra Musicians Program I: Quartet at the Opera," ar...
04/13/2021
MET Orchestra Musicians Program I: Quartet at the Opera, April 9, 2021 at 8:00 PM ET (Concerts from the Library of Congress, 2020-2021)

Library of Congress virtual concerts, including the recent "MET Orchestra Musicians Program I: Quartet at the Opera," are available for repeated viewing on the Library's website. Enjoy! https://loc.gov/concerts/met-orchestra-april9.html

Thrilling audiences with more than 200 performances each season, the MET Orchestra is one of the world’s great performing ensembles, both on stage and in the opera pit. Since its founding in 1883, the MET Orchestra’s performances have encompassed not only the entire opera repertoire, but also sy...

04/10/2021
MET Orchestra Musicians Program I: Quartet at the Opera

Thrilling audiences with more than 200 performances each season, the MET Orchestra is one of the world’s great performing ensembles, both on stage and in the opera pit. Since its founding in 1883, the MET Orchestra’s performances have encompassed not only the entire opera repertoire, but also symphonic and chamber programs at Carnegie Hall, international tours, and countless musician activities outside of the Metropolitan Opera House. In the first of two concerts prepared for the Library, the MET Orchestra Musicians present a varied program of chamber music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Giacomo Puccini, Samuel Barber and Giuseppe Verdi.

MOZART
Clarinet Quintet in A major, K. 581

PUCCINI
I Crisantemi​ (Chrysanthemums)

SAMUEL BARBER
Dover Beach​, op. 3

VERDI
String Quartet in E minor

A 2015 performance by the Calefax Reed Quintet, including Ockeghem's "Mort, tu as navré de ton dart", Franck's "Prélude,...
04/08/2021
Calefax Reed Quintet

A 2015 performance by the Calefax Reed Quintet, including Ockeghem's "Mort, tu as navré de ton dart", Franck's "Prélude, fugue et variation, op. 18", Selected Studies for Player Piano by Nancarrow, Richard Strauss' "Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche, op. 28" and Selections from Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues, op. 87. https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-6821/

A performance by the Calefax Reed Quintet, including Ockeghem's "Mort, tu as navré de ton dart", Franck's "Prélude, fugue et variation, op. 18", Selected Studies for Player Piano by Nancarrow, Richard Strauss' "Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche, op. 28" and Selections from Shostakovich's Prelude...

April 7th is the birthday of jazz great Billie Holiday (1915-1959). Below is a picture from the Library's William P. Got...
04/07/2021

April 7th is the birthday of jazz great Billie Holiday (1915-1959). Below is a picture from the Library's William P. Gottlieb Collection of Ms. Holiday with her dog Mister. You can explore more images from the Gottlieb Collection on the Library's website at www.loc.gov, and don't forget to listen to local jazz radio for the well-deserved tributes that will certainly be broadcast.

April 7th is the birthday of jazz great Billie Holiday (1915-1959). Below is a picture from the Library's William P. Gottlieb Collection of Ms. Holiday with her dog Mister. You can explore more images from the Gottlieb Collection on the Library's website at www.loc.gov, and don't forget to listen to local jazz radio for the well-deserved tributes that will certainly be broadcast.

The Music Division's guide to the life and work of Louis Moreau Gottschalk is the 900th research guide published by the ...
04/06/2021
Research Guides: Louis Moreau Gottschalk: A Guide to Resources: Introduction

The Music Division's guide to the life and work of Louis Moreau Gottschalk is the 900th research guide published by the Library of Congress! That's a lot of research guides! https://guides.loc.gov/louis-moreau-gottschalk

To see a full list of research guides available at the Library of Congress, explore this page. https://guides.loc.gov/?b=g&d=a

Louis Gottschalk was the first internationally famous American musician. This guide provides links to resources at the Library of Congress related to his life and works.

National Dance Week 2021 begins April 19th. Today's post gives an early launch to National Dance Week by featuring dance...
04/05/2021
Dance in Our Web Archives | In The Muse: Performing Arts Blog

National Dance Week 2021 begins April 19th. Today's post gives an early launch to National Dance Week by featuring dance, dancers, and choreographers within archived websites at the Library of Congress! http://blogs.loc.gov/music/2021/04/dance-in-our-web-archives/

National Dance Week 2021 begins April 19th. Today's post gives an early launch to National Dance Week by featuring dance, dancers, and choreographers within archived websites at the Library of Congress!

Below is an 11th century manuscript of tracts for Good Friday (Domine audivi, and Eripe me, domine), preceded by part of...
04/02/2021

Below is an 11th century manuscript of tracts for Good Friday (Domine audivi, and Eripe me, domine), preceded by part of a psalm antiphon. Check out the Library of Congress's collection of 10th-16th century liturgical chants at the following link. https://www.loc.gov/collections/tenth-to-sixteenth-century-liturgical-chants/

Below is an 11th century manuscript of tracts for Good Friday (Domine audivi, and Eripe me, domine), preceded by part of a psalm antiphon. Check out the Library of Congress's collection of 10th-16th century liturgical chants at the following link. https://www.loc.gov/collections/tenth-to-sixteenth-century-liturgical-chants/

The recent virtual concert by Dudok Quartet Amsterdam is still available on the Library of Congress website. https://www...
04/01/2021
Dudok Quartet Amsterdam Concert

The recent virtual concert by Dudok Quartet Amsterdam is still available on the Library of Congress website. https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-9737/

If you are looking for other past concerts, search here. https://www.loc.gov/collections/event-videos/

Dudok Quartet Amsterdam comes to the virtual stage with a program connecting Brahms with Webern and Ligeti. With its recordings garnering enthusiastic praise from publications like Gramophone, The Guardian and The Strad, the quartet is establishing a reputation as a dynamic ensemble with thoughtful....

Women’s History Month is filled with blog posts, articles, and public programs dedicated to the celebration and recognit...
03/31/2021
Celebrate Women’s History Month with Music Research Guides | In The Muse: Performing Arts Blog

Women’s History Month is filled with blog posts, articles, and public programs dedicated to the celebration and recognition of women’s contributions to society. The Music Division is happy to promote the following research guides on women in music, some of which were recently published just in time for Women’s History Month. https://blogs.loc.gov/music/2021/03/celebrate-womens-history-month-with-music-research-guides/

In recognition of Women's History Month, the Music Division shares its recently published online research guides about women composers and women in music.

March 31, 1732, was the birthday of Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn. Haydn, known for his sense of humor, wrote a s...
03/31/2021

March 31, 1732, was the birthday of Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn. Haydn, known for his sense of humor, wrote a set of variations for piano on the Austrian folk song, "acht Sauschneider müssen seÿn" (eight Sauschneider there must be). The folk song's lyrics, not included in Haydn's composition, count the number of "Sauschneider" needed to neuter a boar. It begins with eight and counts down to one, verse by verse. Haydn wrote his set of variations on the tune in a quasi-improvisational style. The manuscript is held in the Gisella Selden-Goth Collection at the Library of Congress. https://www.loc.gov/item/2016561596/

It's "Cherry Blossom Time in Washington" and the trees are in peak bloom. Take time to enjoy the beauty of nature wherev...
03/30/2021

It's "Cherry Blossom Time in Washington" and the trees are in peak bloom. Take time to enjoy the beauty of nature wherever you are.

https://www.loc.gov/item/2012562026/

Find some time to enjoy this new blog post about the theatrical producer and all-around busy guy, Roger Stevens, written...
03/29/2021
Go, Go, Go! A View into the Busy Life of Roger L. Stevens | In The Muse: Performing Arts Blog

Find some time to enjoy this new blog post about the theatrical producer and all-around busy guy, Roger Stevens, written by Music Division archivist Monica Hurd.
https://blogs.loc.gov/music/2021/03/go-go-go-a-view-into-the-busy-life-of-roger-l-stevens/

The following is a guest post from Archives Processing Technician Mónica Hurd. Do you feel like you have too much on your plate? Are you struggling to keep track of all your assignments? Do you need help organizing your life? Well, fear not fellow scatterbrain, for Roger L. Stevens is here! Whi...

03/27/2021
Dudok Quartet Amsterdam

Judith van Driel and Marleen Wester, violin
Marie-Louise de Jong, viola
David Faber, cello
Dudok Quartet Amsterdam comes to the virtual stage with a program connecting Brahms with Webern and Ligeti. With its recordings garnering enthusiastic praise from publications like Gramophone, The Guardian and The Strad, the quartet is establishing a reputation as a dynamic ensemble with thoughtful programs that include their own transcriptions.

WEBERN
Langsamer Satz
String Quartet, op. 28

LIGETI
String Quartet no. 2

BRAHMS/DUDOK
Intermezzo in B minor, op. 119/1

BRAHMS
String Quartet no. 3 in B-flat major, op. 67

Hiram Simmons (1874–1938) was a Black composer and musician in Portsmouth, Virginia, known primarily for his gospel musi...
03/26/2021
Bertha W. Edwards collection on Hiram Simmons, 1907-1980 (Library of Congress Finding Aid)

Hiram Simmons (1874–1938) was a Black composer and musician in Portsmouth, Virginia, known primarily for his gospel music. He also worked as an educator, music publisher, and organist. The Simmons material collected by Portsmouth librarian Bertha W. Edwards includes published music, one photograph, and a biographical sketch. https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.music/eadmus.mu021003

Hiram Simmons (1874–1938) was a Black composer and musician in Portsmouth, Virginia, known primarily for his gospel music. He also worked as an educator, music publisher, and organist. The Simmons material collected by Portsmouth librarian Bertha W. Edwards includes published music, one photograph...

Join us tomorrow, Friday at 8:00 pm for the premiere of Dudok Quartet Amsterdam.
03/25/2021

Join us tomorrow, Friday at 8:00 pm for the premiere of Dudok Quartet Amsterdam.

03/25/2021
New World Symphony

March 25th is the birthday of composer Béla Bartók (1881-1945). The Library of Congress holds many important music manuscripts and correspondence by Bartók, including his famous Concerto for Orchestra.
On March 12, 2021, the New World Symphony presented a virtual program for the Library of Congress concert series that included a performance of Bartók's Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion. The piece starts at the 26:12 mark in the video linked below. https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-9720/

Founded in 1987 by the legendary conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, the New World Symphony, known as "America's Orchestral Academy," prepares graduates of music programs for leadership roles in professional orchestras and ensembles. These talented young musicians present a dynamic program of works by....

03/24/2021
Dudok Quartet Amsterdam

Judith van Driel and Marleen Wester, violin
Marie-Louise de Jong, viola
David Faber, cello
Dudok Quartet Amsterdam comes to the virtual stage with a program connecting Brahms with Webern and Ligeti. With its recordings garnering enthusiastic praise from publications like Gramophone, The Guardian and The Strad, the quartet is establishing a reputation as a dynamic ensemble with thoughtful programs that include their own transcriptions.

WEBERN
Langsamer Satz
String Quartet, op. 28

LIGETI
String Quartet no. 2

BRAHMS/DUDOK
Intermezzo in B minor, op. 119/1

BRAHMS
String Quartet no. 3 in B-flat major, op. 67

Interested in finding works by Amy Marcy Cheney Beach at the Library of Congress? Check out this newly published researc...
03/23/2021
Research Guides: Amy Beach: A Guide to Primary and Secondary Resources at the Library of Congress: Introduction

Interested in finding works by Amy Marcy Cheney Beach at the Library of Congress? Check out this newly published research guide. https://guides.loc.gov/amy-beach

Amy Beach (1867-1944) was one of the most significant American women composers of the early 20th century. This guide provides an overview to the print, manuscript, and digital collections in the Library’s Music Division related to her career and music.

March 22 is circled on the calendars of many musical theater aficionados. It is the birthday of both Stephen Sondheim an...
03/22/2021

March 22 is circled on the calendars of many musical theater aficionados. It is the birthday of both Stephen Sondheim and Andrew Lloyd Webber (my apologies to A.L.W. for making this post all about Sondheim).

The birthday greeting below was sent to Sondheim by Leonard Bernstein in 1980. He cleverly uses the solfège names of two notes (E-flat=Es, A=La) to represent the initials S (for Stephen) and L (for Leonard). The two notes create the interval of a diminished fifth, also known as a tritone. A tritone represents their friendship most appropriately since they first worked together on "West Side Story," in which Bernstein used the tritone as a unifying musical device throughout the work.

03/20/2021
Steven Osborne, piano

Brilliant Scottish pianist Steven Osborne offers a program of fragments and forgotten images illuminated by a classic evocation of moonlight. The music of Debussy and Rachmaninoff, two specialties of the pianist, shines in this special concert that includes works held in the Library’s collection.

DEBUSSY
Images oubliées
Suite bergamasque

RACHMANINOFF
Prelude in D minor (op. posth.)
Fragments
Oriental Sketch

RACHMANINOFF/OSBORNE
Nunc dimittis from the All-Night Vigil, op. 37

RACHMANINOFF
Piano Sonata no. 1 in D minor, op. 28

The Library of Congress published a new research guide for American composer Eleanor Everest Freer. The guide has a comp...
03/19/2021
Research Guides: Eleanor Everest Freer: A Guide to Resources: Introduction

The Library of Congress published a new research guide for American composer Eleanor Everest Freer. The guide has a complete list of her 46 manuscripts held at the library, including many one-act operas that are unjustly neglected. https://guides.loc.gov/eleanor-everest-freer

This guide provides resources to research the life and work of American composer Eleanor Everest Freer (1864-1942), who was an advocate for American opera as well as a skilled composer.

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Comments

https://youtu.be/FAMhHX5cJd8 Fico feliz por estar no catálogo da Library Of Congress, entre os violonistas brasileiros que criaram algum estilo musical.
Please join me for this concert?
Is tonight's symphony performance going to be recorded and shared on social media or Mark on the web after the concert?
As wonderful as the Campaign for Civic Strength will be virtually held at the Library of Congress on March 11, April 15th, and May 13th, I want to bring to your attention that www.sylverastreamingvideos.com has G-Force Streaming Videos New Movies and Old Classics with TV Shows. Check it out.
Another contribution to honoring Black Americans during Black History Month...
Does the LofC have copies of Goldberg, the Early Music Magazine? I am looking for an interview in one of the issues.
“Oasis: A universal language of Love and Acceptance!” Prithu’s latest creation with a message of positive perspectives, hope, and equality around this pandemic, just in time for Thanksgiving!
Thank you for creating this page. I am eager to learn more. I have tagged a few friends.
@Walter Parks Aug 12. How do I watch it in Florida? Web show at website?? Thanks.
Hi, I am researching my DUMBLETON family history. During my research I discovered several documents that you had in your library that relate to the Dumbleton name. These documents are notated music by H. Dumbleton. They are dated 1854. I believe that they are Minstrel (Negro) music. I know that there was a Dumbleton and his band of Minstrels. I am assuming, although i may be wrong, that they are both the same man. However, i know nothing about him. I was wondering what you can tell me about him like where he was from, when he was born etc. Are there any pictures of what he looked like? Any information you are able to share would be greatly appreciated. I am unable to visit in person due to my location being the UK. In fact any information on anything Dumbleton related that you are allowed to share would be really useful. Thank you for your time. I look forward to hearing from you. P.Si have emailed the "Ask a Librarian" and was told to contact the Performing Arts department. I cannot find an Email address for the department so i am posting on here
PLEASE SIGN, SHARE, SPREAD THE WORD, AND PLEASE...HELP MAKE THIS ILLEGAL IN THE UNITED STATES: STOP DYEING DOGS'(AND OTHER ANIMALS') FUR! When it comes to hair dyes, they are not meant for animals. Many canine owners think it’s so cute to dye their dog’s hair. You may have even seen pictures on the Internet of dogs with their hair dyed and thought, “how cute”. It’s not cute. In fact, it’s downright harmful to a canine’s health because of the dye’s toxic chemicals. Emma Watson, the actress who played Hermione Granger in Harry Potter, was seen leaving a salon with Darcy, a one-year-old Maltese terrier believed to be her flatmate’s dog friend. The dog’s fur had been dyed pink. The pictures began a vicious discussion among canine lovers with many of them critical of it. According to some veterinarians, it doesn’t matter if the dye is safe because it changes how the dog will smell and look to other animals – in fact, affecting how the animals interact with one another. You might be asking yourself why anyone would dye their canine friend’s hair. 1 – They’re bored with nothing to do but dyeing their canine’s fur. 2 – They saw a dog that had its hair dyed and thought it would be cool to do too. 3 – Some people love including their pets in celebrations such as Christmas, Halloween, etc. 3 Primary Reasons Not To Dye Your Canine’s Fur It’s important to understand that while there are several reasons you shouldn’t dye a dog’s hair, there are just really three primary reasons not to do it. 1 – Hair Dye Is For Humans Hair dye is formulated for human hair, not dog hair. There has been no hair dyes made especially for dogs because there have been no actual studies completed on the long-term effects of hair dyes on dogs. People have reported suffering health problems from hair dye, so it’s only natural for one to assume that dogs can have some similar reactions. On top of that, a canine’s skin is extremely delicate and may react negatively to harsh chemicals such hydrogen peroxide and ammonia, which are found in the human hair dyes. 2 – Risks To Their Health Hair dye on humans is only done to one area of the body. For canines, however, it’s the entire body. There’s a possibility that the dye gets into their ears, eyes and/or mouth, which is harmful to them. Also, people using hair dyes have reported suffering with itching, burning and skin irritation. Imagine you’d feel if all these chemicals were put onto your body. Dogs are like humans in that they can also have allergic reactions to the hair dye. There’s also the possibility that a dog will try and lick his/her coat during the application process. This will lead to ingestion of those chemicals, which is deadly to humans and animals. If a dog consumes any of the hair dye it can cause a number of issues including but not limited to diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting! 3 –Psychological Consequences People generally dye their hair for cosmetic motives; however, dogs don’t have this concept. They have no knowledge as to why their hair is being done. And, for the most part, they don’t like it due to how unnatural it is. Dogs cannot control what they look like and they have no ability to change how they look themselves. You should never dye your dog’s hair – regardless of the reason why you want to do it. Physically, they can suffer with vomiting from accidental ingestion, chemical burns and skin irritations. Psychologically, your dog is unable to understand why you are dyeing their fur because it’s an unnatural process to them… beyond their control. Besides, canines have beautiful coat colors – white, black, tan, auburn, brown, etc. – so you should enjoy their natural colors and beauty. Other Reasons to NEVER DYE DOGS'(PETS') HAIR: 1. A Dog Gets No Amusement Out Of Being Purple Or Any Other Color. Most dog owners will agree that their pooch has a unique personality. Dogs are sentient beings, not playthings, and don't seem to get any enjoyment out of suddenly becoming another color. When a pet owner dyes their dog, they are doing it for their own satisfaction, not their pet's. It's important to remember the difference and value the opinions of our canine companions, even if they can't voice them in words. 2. Your Dog Might Be Allergic To The Dye Some humans who dye their hair have allergic reactions to hair dye products, so it's not unreasonable to assume that dogs could be allergic to hair dye as well. Reactions may include itchy skin, which can be annoying and irritating for your furry friend. If they scratch themselves hard enough, dogs can also develop sores which can possibly become infected. Additionally, constant scratching of the ears or shaking of the head may cause the development of hematomas, or blisters filled with blood. If the discomfort a dog experiences is too extreme or lasts long enough, it can create behavioral changes as well. 3. Dyeing Your Dog's Fur Stresses Them Out For many dogs, being groomed is not a calming experience. And since dogs cannot comprehend what's going on when they're being dyed, coloring a dog's fur can cause them more stress. They may even have trouble recognizing themselves afterwards. A stressed dog is not a happy dog and anxiety can cause loss of appetite, aggression, isolation, or stomach issues such as diarrhea or constipation. Dogs who are stressed out for too long can develop behavior problems and the physical and mental aggravation caused by their anxiety can worsen over time if the cause is ignored. 4. It's Possible For Dogs To Get Painful Ear Infections During The Dyeing Process People who've dyed their own hair know the process requires a lot of water. Like humans, dogs can accumulate water in their ears, but this can cause painful complications for your pooch. A dog's ear is configured differently than a human's, since their ear canal has a L shape which can easily trap water. The longer the water sits in their ears, the more likely it is for bacteria or yeast to grow in the moist environment and cause an ear infection. Dogs with floppy ears are often more likely to get ear infections since they have more folds in their ears to retain moisture. 5. It Can Be Humiliating To Your Furry Friend Many dog owners can usually tell when their pooch is happy or upset, but dogs are also capable of feeling humiliation. They don't understand the dyeing process and know when they are being laughed at or being given attention that they don't want. Caroline Kisko of the Kennel Club believes owners need to draw a line between their own vanity and a dog's needs, as well as realize that dogs who are humiliated might not always show such feelings. 6. Dyed Dogs Are Not Natural Or Necessary When humans dye their hair, they usually do so to express their individuality. Dogs, however, express themselves in other ways and don't need to be pink to feel like themselves. Dyeing a dog's fur treats them more like an accessory than a living creature. There are many other ways to show off your dog, such as ribbons, bandanas, or dog clothing. Even a silly Halloween costume is a better choice. If dogs were meant to be blue with yellow polka dots, they would have been born that way. A spokesperson for PETA says, "PETA would urge people to let dogs be dogs: love and appreciate them for their natural beauty and leave them out of our confusing human shenanigans." 7. Dye Changes How Dogs Smell And Appear To Other Dogs A visit to a dog park will demonstrate that dogs tend to sniff each other a lot. They use their acute sense of smell to determine the gender, emotional state, and even the diet of another dog. It's been claimed that a dog's nose is 10,000 to 100,000 times more accurate than that of a human. But when a dog's fur is dyed, their smell changes along with their appearance. This can confuse other dogs, especially if they are a dog they had previously met and were already comfortable with. Dyed fur can also alarm your dog when they realize they themselves smell different. 8. Safe Dog Dye Brands May Have Misleading Packaging The labeling on dog dye can be misleading if you don't read the package carefully. Dog dye brands marked hypoallergenic or non-toxic may also feature warnings about the product possibly causing itching and skin irritation in the fine print at the bottom. Also, in conflict to the "non-toxic" claim, certain products might also feature warnings about washing a dog's mouth out for 15 minutes and immediately contacting a vet if the product is accidentally ingested. Be sure to read a dye product's label carefully. You should assume there will be medical hazards with any product, no matter how it may be advertised as "safe" and "natural." --