Latin American Program

Latin American Program The Latin American Program provides a nonpartisan forum for experts and scholars to discuss the most critical issues facing the Hemisphere. The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, established by
Congress in 1968 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., is the living, national memorial to President Wilson.

It is a nonpartisan institution, supported by public and private funds, engaged in the study of national and world affairs.

It is a nonpartisan institution, supported by public and private funds, engaged in the study of national and world affairs.

Operating as usual

08/20/2021

An essential step for combatting corruption head-on is to recognize the disease. That way the proper medicine can be prescribed. It is essential to understand how corruption works, because we are no longer talking about the corruption of just a small group of officials, or of just one country. As Gloria [Porras] said, corruption is transnational,” says Ana María Calderón, former Representative of the OAS Secretary General at the Mission to Support the Fight against Corruption and Impunity in Honduras (MACCIH). Watch the full webcast of our conversation on the outlook for fighting corruption and strengthening democratic institutions in Central America:

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/fighting-corruption-and-strengthening-democracy-lessons-central-america?fbclid=IwAR2A589rNY0r50xJZwI_uuk-4PUjz-sWiJeKfVab_Dcz9kjS2ef7WjFD7YM

"Some have said that Nicaraguan leader Daniel Ortega’s arrests of his potential rivals in this year’s presidential elect...
08/19/2021
Nicaragua: Ortega Started to Kill Democracy a Long Time Ago

"Some have said that Nicaraguan leader Daniel Ortega’s arrests of his potential rivals in this year’s presidential election, as well as of journalists and civil society activists, mark the end of democracy in Nicaragua. But if democracy has died in Nicaragua, this is truly a chronicle of a death foretold. Looking at the history of Ortega’s rule since he won office in 2006, it is clear that he jumped off the track of democratic governance almost from the beginning," writes Richard Sanders, a former member of the Senior Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State and former Deputy Chief of Mission in Nicaragua from 2007 to 2010.

Read our latest publication:

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/nicaragua-ortega-started-kill-democracy-long-time-ago

The Wilson Center’s prestigious Latin American Program provides non-partisan expertise to a broad community of decision makers in the United States and Latin America on critical policy issues facing the Hemisphere. The Program provides insightful and actionable research for policymakers, private s...

08/19/2021

“The concept [of nearshoring] has broad support, but as Richard [Feinberg] said, this is not something that happens on its own. This doesn't just happen. It has to be made to happen. There has to be a deliberate approach to incentivize all of these and that, of course, wades into a whole range of competing demands,” says Ricardo Zúñiga, Special Envoy for the Northern Triangle at the U.S. Department of State.

Watch the full webcast of our discussion on nearshoring opportunities in Latin America:

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/moving-day-nearshoring-opportunities-latin-america?fbclid=IwAR3NfpfrENEf2mvGE1KXBz7TD7rh4UKUX3wN-fdt4NOX1lngTX7byNupZOc

08/19/2021

“I believe that, with the force of the citizenry, as currently expressed in Guatemala, with denunciation but also with of the gathering of knowledge that fosters an independent press and particularly investigative journalism, it is possible to begin rethinking the kinds of actions that need to be carried out in the region. I insist on the process of consolidating the rule of law,” says Ivan Velasquez Gómez, former Commissioner of the UN Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG). Watch the full webcast of our conversation on the outlook for fighting corruption and strengthening democratic institutions in Central America:

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/fighting-corruption-and-strengthening-democracy-lessons-central-america

“Es probable que los precios de las materias primas, por ejemplo, se mantengan altos, al igual que el gasto público, lo ...
08/18/2021
Qué está pasando con la inflación en América Latina y en qué países se ha disparado - BBC News Mundo

“Es probable que los precios de las materias primas, por ejemplo, se mantengan altos, al igual que el gasto público, lo que alimenta los temores de que se produzca una estanflación,” comenta Benjamin Gedan a BBC News Mundo sobre la inflación en América Latina.

https://www.bbc.com/mundo/noticias-58195519

Las mayores economías de la región están frente a una nueva tendencia después de una de las peores recesiones en décadas por la pandemia.

08/17/2021

“Labeling the greater Caribbean basin as friendly allied partners would require a re- conceptualization of the Caribbean, […] we would have to look at the region as being integral to US security, to US prosperity, as integral to our national destiny,” says Richard E. Feinberg, Professor Emeritus at the University of California San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy.

Watch the full webcast of our discussion on nearshoring opportunities in Latin America:

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/moving-day-nearshoring-opportunities-latin-america?fbclid=IwAR0Q0YKLiZhxm3o-vWRYB47cN4mhDmg0IsDMnmG_EqPazdYefjefR4DUe-0

“The polls demonstrate that there is a deep desire for change, but there’s also deep fatigue for two reasons, not only t...
08/16/2021
Venezuelan government, opposition leaders meet in Mexico

“The polls demonstrate that there is a deep desire for change, but there’s also deep fatigue for two reasons, not only the daily struggle for survival, but also the inability of politicians up until now to make any difference in their daily lives. […] I think there’s a broad skepticism,” Cynthia Arnson, director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program, told the Associated Press.

https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-business-health-mexico-venezuela-29bbd3bea9dfc274afb917615d07e4eb

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Representatives of President Nicolás Maduro and the Venezuelan opposition on Friday showed eagerness to find a common path out of their country’s political standoff, meeting in neutral territory for formal dialogue for the first time in more than two years and agreeing on an ...

08/16/2021

“Corruption does not only affect our society, it transcends it. We are speaking of a transnational problem. The path that I advise we should take to confront this phenomenon, evidently, is not unilateral; it is not only of Guatemala, it is not only of El Salvador or Honduras. It is an issue that must be addressed at the international level, because the effects transcend to other countries,” says Gloria Porras, Magistrate-Elect of the Constitutional Court of Guatemala and a Public Policy Fellow at the Wilson Center. Watch the full webcast of our conversation on the outlook for fighting corruption and strengthening democratic institutions in Central America:

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/fighting-corruption-and-strengthening-democracy-lessons-central-america

08/16/2021

“Nearshoring is not only important to recover from the pandemic, but to really bringing a new era of sustainable growth to the region. I can really say […] that the IDB is leading the way in this regard,” says Mauricio Claver-Carone, President of the Inter-American Development Bank.

Watch the full webcast of our discussion on nearshoring opportunities in Latin America:

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/moving-day-nearshoring-opportunities-latin-america

This week in #LaSemanita, military troops parade in Brasilia🇧🇷 hours before @camaradeputados votes on President Bolsonar...
08/13/2021

This week in #LaSemanita, military troops parade in Brasilia🇧🇷 hours before @camaradeputados votes on President Bolsonaro's key proposals to require printed receipts from ballot boxes allegedly prone to fraud. In 🇨🇴, 148 lbs of explosives were found that were meant to carry out a terrorist attack in @GAB_Bogota. Want to know more?👇

This week in #LaSemanita, military troops parade in Brasilia🇧🇷 hours before @camaradeputados votes on President Bolsonaro's key proposals to require printed receipts from ballot boxes allegedly prone to fraud. In 🇨🇴, 148 lbs of explosives were found that were meant to carry out a terrorist attack in @GAB_Bogota. Want to know more?👇

As schools in Latin America struggle to reopen amid another wave of the pandemic, online learning platforms remain essen...
08/11/2021

As schools in Latin America struggle to reopen amid another wave of the pandemic, online learning platforms remain essential tools. Latin American students have suffered the most lost days of in-person learning of any region. Today, most of Latin America has partially reopened classrooms, but schools in several countries in the region remain fully closed. In the long-term, these educational losses could reduce the region’s potential GDP by 16 percent, according to the World Bank.

To learn how education technology could provide long-term solutions for the region’s educational challenges, please join the Latin American Program on Tuesday, August 17, 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET for a discussion about the advantages and limitations of online education in Latin America and its post-pandemic prospects. This seminar is co-sponsored by Zoom Video Communications.

Speakers:

Leandro Folgar Ruétalo, President, Plan Ceibal

María Cristina Cárdenas Peralta, Head of Coursera, Latin America

Jacqueline Lopes, Head, Government & Industry Relations LATAM South, Ericsson

Moderator:

Benjamin Gedan, Deputy Director, Latin American Program/ Director, Argentina Project

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/getting-closer-distance-learning-online-education-latin-america

As schools in Latin America struggle to reopen amid another wave of the pandemic, online learning platforms remain essential tools. Latin American students have suffered the most lost days of in-person learning of any region. Today, most of Latin America has partially reopened classrooms, but schools in several countries in the region remain fully closed. In the long-term, these educational losses could reduce the region’s potential GDP by 16 percent, according to the World Bank.

To learn how education technology could provide long-term solutions for the region’s educational challenges, please join the Latin American Program on Tuesday, August 17, 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET for a discussion about the advantages and limitations of online education in Latin America and its post-pandemic prospects. This seminar is co-sponsored by Zoom Video Communications.

Speakers:

Leandro Folgar Ruétalo, President, Plan Ceibal

María Cristina Cárdenas Peralta, Head of Coursera, Latin America

Jacqueline Lopes, Head, Government & Industry Relations LATAM South, Ericsson

Moderator:

Benjamin Gedan, Deputy Director, Latin American Program/ Director, Argentina Project

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/getting-closer-distance-learning-online-education-latin-america

On the eve of negotiations expected to begin between officials of the Venezuelan government and members of the political...
08/10/2021

On the eve of negotiations expected to begin between officials of the Venezuelan government and members of the political opposition, the Latin American Program is pleased to publish a new study, Venezuela’s Elusive Transition: Toward a New Path, by Abraham F. Lowenthal. The author, a leading scholar on inter-American affairs and the Program’s founding director, draws on extensive interviews and research on Venezuela as well as his previous work on transitions from authoritarian rule toward democracy in Latin America and other regions. Lowenthal identifies the recurrent challenges such transitions face and suggests how the chances that an autocratic regime will give way peacefully can be improved.

Lowenthal outlines five principles for an effective strategy: developing and articulating an attractive, feasible and genuinely inclusionary vision for Venezuela’s future; cooperating with incumbent Venezuelan officials and the international community on practical measures to improve the quality of life for all Venezuelans; prioritizing participation in free, fair, credible, and internationally monitored elections; developing processes to achieve transitional justice under law for all Venezuelans; and encouraging the valid and supportive role various nations could play, consistent with their own interests, in removing obstacles to a better future for Venezuela.

This paper is part of a series produced by the Latin American Program’s Venezuela Working Group.

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/venezuelas-elusive-transition-toward-new-path

On the eve of negotiations expected to begin between officials of the Venezuelan government and members of the political opposition, the Latin American Program is pleased to publish a new study, Venezuela’s Elusive Transition: Toward a New Path, by Abraham F. Lowenthal. The author, a leading scholar on inter-American affairs and the Program’s founding director, draws on extensive interviews and research on Venezuela as well as his previous work on transitions from authoritarian rule toward democracy in Latin America and other regions. Lowenthal identifies the recurrent challenges such transitions face and suggests how the chances that an autocratic regime will give way peacefully can be improved.

Lowenthal outlines five principles for an effective strategy: developing and articulating an attractive, feasible and genuinely inclusionary vision for Venezuela’s future; cooperating with incumbent Venezuelan officials and the international community on practical measures to improve the quality of life for all Venezuelans; prioritizing participation in free, fair, credible, and internationally monitored elections; developing processes to achieve transitional justice under law for all Venezuelans; and encouraging the valid and supportive role various nations could play, consistent with their own interests, in removing obstacles to a better future for Venezuela.

This paper is part of a series produced by the Latin American Program’s Venezuela Working Group.

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/venezuelas-elusive-transition-toward-new-path

As schools in Latin America struggle to reopen amid another wave of the pandemic, online learning platforms remain essen...
08/10/2021

As schools in Latin America struggle to reopen amid another wave of the pandemic, online learning platforms remain essential tools. Latin American students have suffered the most lost days of in-person learning of any region. Today, most of Latin America has partially reopened classrooms, but schools in several countries in the region remain fully closed. In the long-term, these educational losses could reduce the region’s potential GDP by 16 percent, according to the World Bank.

To learn how education technology could provide long-term solutions for the region’s educational challenges, please join the Latin American Program on Tuesday, August 17, 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET for a discussion about the advantages and limitations of online education in Latin America and its post-pandemic prospects. This seminar is co-sponsored by Zoom Video Communications.

Speakers:

Elena Arias Ortiz, Senior Sector Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank

Leandro Folgar, President, Plan Ceibal

María Cristina Cárdenas Peralta, Head of Coursera, Latin America

Jacqueline Lopes, Head, Government & Industry Relations LATAM South, Ericsson

Moderator:

Benjamin Gedan, Deputy Director, Latin American Program/ Director, Argentina Project

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/getting-closer-distance-learning-online-education-latin-america

As schools in Latin America struggle to reopen amid another wave of the pandemic, online learning platforms remain essential tools. Latin American students have suffered the most lost days of in-person learning of any region. Today, most of Latin America has partially reopened classrooms, but schools in several countries in the region remain fully closed. In the long-term, these educational losses could reduce the region’s potential GDP by 16 percent, according to the World Bank.

To learn how education technology could provide long-term solutions for the region’s educational challenges, please join the Latin American Program on Tuesday, August 17, 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET for a discussion about the advantages and limitations of online education in Latin America and its post-pandemic prospects. This seminar is co-sponsored by Zoom Video Communications.

Speakers:

Elena Arias Ortiz, Senior Sector Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank

Leandro Folgar, President, Plan Ceibal

María Cristina Cárdenas Peralta, Head of Coursera, Latin America

Jacqueline Lopes, Head, Government & Industry Relations LATAM South, Ericsson

Moderator:

Benjamin Gedan, Deputy Director, Latin American Program/ Director, Argentina Project

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/getting-closer-distance-learning-online-education-latin-america

08/09/2021

In July 2021, the Americas have been hit by a variety of extreme weather events, including major heat waves in Canada and the United States and intense tropical storms in Central America. Recent droughts and fires in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest have killed nearly 2.5 billion trees, greatly hampering its function as a carbon sink. These events, as well as historic droughts in Mexico, Central America, and South America have re-invigorated discussions about climate change and its impact in the region. Listen to the latest episode of the Wilson Center’s #Americas360 podcast:

https://www.wilsoncenter.org/audio/heat-moment-climate-change-americas

“There is still time for Latin America to get on board and take part in the electric revolution, obtaining economic bene...
08/06/2021

“There is still time for Latin America to get on board and take part in the electric revolution, obtaining economic benefits and improved environmental outcomes in the process,” writes Espen Hauge in our latest #WeeklyAsado.

https://lnkd.in/dWXWBi2Z

“There is still time for Latin America to get on board and take part in the electric revolution, obtaining economic benefits and improved environmental outcomes in the process,” writes Espen Hauge in our latest #WeeklyAsado.

https://lnkd.in/dWXWBi2Z

The @POTUS  administration releases its strategy to address the root causes of migration from Central America, getting s...
08/06/2021

The @POTUS administration releases its strategy to address the root causes of migration from Central America, getting support from 🇲🇽, 🇯🇵, 🇰🇷 and the @UN. Spain’s National Court reopens an investigation against Banco de Chile based on findings of the 2009 investigation of General Pinochet on charges of money laundering. Read the full report 👇

The @POTUS administration releases its strategy to address the root causes of migration from Central America, getting support from 🇲🇽, 🇯🇵, 🇰🇷 and the @UN. Spain’s National Court reopens an investigation against Banco de Chile based on findings of the 2009 investigation of General Pinochet on charges of money laundering. Read the full report 👇

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Comments

An essential step for combatting corruption head-on is to recognize the disease. That way the proper medicine can be prescribed. It is essential to understand how corruption works, because we are no longer talking about the corruption of just a small group of officials, or of just one country. As Gloria [Porras] said, corruption is transnational,” says Ana María Calderón, former Representative of the OAS Secretary General at the Mission to Support the Fight against Corruption and Impunity in Honduras (MACCIH). Watch the full webcast of our conversation on the outlook for fighting corruption and strengthening democratic institutions in Central America: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/fighting-corruption-and-strengthening-democracy-lessons-central-america?fbclid=IwAR2A589rNY0r50xJZwI_uuk-4PUjz-sWiJeKfVab_Dcz9kjS2ef7WjFD7YM
"Some have said that Nicaraguan leader Daniel Ortega’s arrests of his potential rivals in this year’s presidential election, as well as of journalists and civil society activists, mark the end of democracy in Nicaragua. But if democracy has died in Nicaragua, this is truly a chronicle of a death foretold. Looking at the history of Ortega’s rule since he won office in 2006, it is clear that he jumped off the track of democratic governance almost from the beginning," writes Richard Sanders, a former member of the Senior Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State and former Deputy Chief of Mission in Nicaragua from 2007 to 2010. Read our latest publication: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/nicaragua-ortega-started-kill-democracy-long-time-ago
“The concept [of nearshoring] has broad support, but as Richard [Feinberg] said, this is not something that happens on its own. This doesn't just happen. It has to be made to happen. There has to be a deliberate approach to incentivize all of these and that, of course, wades into a whole range of competing demands,” says Ricardo Zúñiga, Special Envoy for the Northern Triangle at the U.S. Department of State. Watch the full webcast of our discussion on nearshoring opportunities in Latin America: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/moving-day-nearshoring-opportunities-latin-america?fbclid=IwAR3NfpfrENEf2mvGE1KXBz7TD7rh4UKUX3wN-fdt4NOX1lngTX7byNupZOc
“I believe that, with the force of the citizenry, as currently expressed in Guatemala, with denunciation but also with of the gathering of knowledge that fosters an independent press and particularly investigative journalism, it is possible to begin rethinking the kinds of actions that need to be carried out in the region. I insist on the process of consolidating the rule of law,” says Ivan Velasquez Gómez, former Commissioner of the UN Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG). Watch the full webcast of our conversation on the outlook for fighting corruption and strengthening democratic institutions in Central America: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/fighting-corruption-and-strengthening-democracy-lessons-central-america
“Es probable que los precios de las materias primas, por ejemplo, se mantengan altos, al igual que el gasto público, lo que alimenta los temores de que se produzca una estanflación,” comenta Benjamin Gedan a BBC News Mundo sobre la inflación en América Latina. https://www.bbc.com/mundo/noticias-58195519
“Labeling the greater Caribbean basin as friendly allied partners would require a re- conceptualization of the Caribbean, […] we would have to look at the region as being integral to US security, to US prosperity, as integral to our national destiny,” says Richard E. Feinberg, Professor Emeritus at the University of California San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy. Watch the full webcast of our discussion on nearshoring opportunities in Latin America: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/moving-day-nearshoring-opportunities-latin-america?fbclid=IwAR0Q0YKLiZhxm3o-vWRYB47cN4mhDmg0IsDMnmG_EqPazdYefjefR4DUe-0
“The polls demonstrate that there is a deep desire for change, but there’s also deep fatigue for two reasons, not only the daily struggle for survival, but also the inability of politicians up until now to make any difference in their daily lives. […] I think there’s a broad skepticism,” Cynthia Arnson, director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program, told the Associated Press. https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-business-health-mexico-venezuela-29bbd3bea9dfc274afb917615d07e4eb
“Corruption does not only affect our society, it transcends it. We are speaking of a transnational problem. The path that I advise we should take to confront this phenomenon, evidently, is not unilateral; it is not only of Guatemala, it is not only of El Salvador or Honduras. It is an issue that must be addressed at the international level, because the effects transcend to other countries,” says Gloria Porras, Magistrate-Elect of the Constitutional Court of Guatemala and a Public Policy Fellow at the Wilson Center. Watch the full webcast of our conversation on the outlook for fighting corruption and strengthening democratic institutions in Central America: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/fighting-corruption-and-strengthening-democracy-lessons-central-america
“Nearshoring is not only important to recover from the pandemic, but to really bringing a new era of sustainable growth to the region. I can really say […] that the IDB is leading the way in this regard,” says Mauricio Claver-Carone, President of the Inter-American Development Bank. Watch the full webcast of our discussion on nearshoring opportunities in Latin America: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/moving-day-nearshoring-opportunities-latin-america
This week in #LaSemanita, military troops parade in Brasilia🇧🇷 hours before @camaradeputados votes on President Bolsonaro's key proposals to require printed receipts from ballot boxes allegedly prone to fraud. In 🇨🇴, 148 lbs of explosives were found that were meant to carry out a terrorist attack in @GAB_Bogota. Want to know more?👇
As schools in Latin America struggle to reopen amid another wave of the pandemic, online learning platforms remain essential tools. Latin American students have suffered the most lost days of in-person learning of any region. Today, most of Latin America has partially reopened classrooms, but schools in several countries in the region remain fully closed. In the long-term, these educational losses could reduce the region’s potential GDP by 16 percent, according to the World Bank. To learn how education technology could provide long-term solutions for the region’s educational challenges, please join the Latin American Program on Tuesday, August 17, 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET for a discussion about the advantages and limitations of online education in Latin America and its post-pandemic prospects. This seminar is co-sponsored by Zoom Video Communications. Speakers: Leandro Folgar Ruétalo, President, Plan Ceibal María Cristina Cárdenas Peralta, Head of Coursera, Latin America Jacqueline Lopes, Head, Government & Industry Relations LATAM South, Ericsson Moderator: Benjamin Gedan, Deputy Director, Latin American Program/ Director, Argentina Project https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/getting-closer-distance-learning-online-education-latin-america
On the eve of negotiations expected to begin between officials of the Venezuelan government and members of the political opposition, the Latin American Program is pleased to publish a new study, Venezuela’s Elusive Transition: Toward a New Path, by Abraham F. Lowenthal. The author, a leading scholar on inter-American affairs and the Program’s founding director, draws on extensive interviews and research on Venezuela as well as his previous work on transitions from authoritarian rule toward democracy in Latin America and other regions. Lowenthal identifies the recurrent challenges such transitions face and suggests how the chances that an autocratic regime will give way peacefully can be improved. Lowenthal outlines five principles for an effective strategy: developing and articulating an attractive, feasible and genuinely inclusionary vision for Venezuela’s future; cooperating with incumbent Venezuelan officials and the international community on practical measures to improve the quality of life for all Venezuelans; prioritizing participation in free, fair, credible, and internationally monitored elections; developing processes to achieve transitional justice under law for all Venezuelans; and encouraging the valid and supportive role various nations could play, consistent with their own interests, in removing obstacles to a better future for Venezuela. This paper is part of a series produced by the Latin American Program’s Venezuela Working Group. https://www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/venezuelas-elusive-transition-toward-new-path