National Transportation Safety Board

National Transportation Safety Board NTSB is an independent agency charged with investigating civil aviation accidents in the US and significant accidents in other modes of transportation.
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SAVE THE DATE! On March 9, 2021, 9:30 a.m. (EST) we finalize our 2021 – 2022 Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety I...
02/01/2021

SAVE THE DATE! On March 9, 2021, 9:30 a.m. (EST) we finalize our 2021 – 2022 Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements (MWL) in a virtual public board meeting.

The MWL is our list of those transportation safety improvements we’d most like to see implemented to help save lives and improve transportation safety.

To provide greater transparency, we are determining the 2021-2022 list at a board meeting. The board meeting will serve as the kickoff event for the two- year campaign. https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/NR20210201.aspx

Media Advisory: 2021 – 2022 Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements Subject of NTSB Meeting​WASHINGTON (F...
02/01/2021
Media Advisory: 2021 – 2022 Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements Subject of NTSB Meeting

Media Advisory: 2021 – 2022 Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements Subject of NTSB Meeting

​WASHINGTON (Feb. 1, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board announced Monday its intent to hold a public board meeting March 9, 2021, 9:30 a.m. (EST) to finalize its 2021 – 2022 Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements.

The NTSB’s Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements is a communication strategy through which the agency identifies its top safety improvements that when made will prevent accidents, reduce the number and severity of injuries, and save lives.

The NTSB previously held media briefings to roll out its Most Wanted List, however, in response to a GAO report calling for more transparency in the development of the list, the NTSB opted to return to the board meeting as one way to help stakeholders, advocacy partners, recommendation recipients and the traveling public understand how and why the 2021 – 2022 list was created.

“From 1990 through 2010 the Most Wanted List was finalized during board meetings,” said Nicholas Worrell, Chief of the NTSB’s Advocacy Division. “In 2011 we reimagined the Most Wanted List and in 2012 we adopted an electronic voting process for the board, which reduced the amount of time and resources necessary to develop the list. In 2018 the GAO audited the NTSB’s process for determining the Most Wanted List and recommended we better document and communicate our decisions about the list. The return to holding a board meeting to finalize the list reflects our commitment to those recommendations,” said Worrell.

In keeping with established federal and local social distancing guidelines to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, while also ensuring the NTSB’s compliance with the Government in the Sunshine Act, the board meeting for the Most Wanted List will be webcast to the public, with the board members and NTSB staff meeting virtually. There will be no physical gathering to facilitate the board meeting.

WHO: NTSB staff and Board Members.

WHAT: A webcast of a virtual board meeting to determine the 2021 – 2022 Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements.

WHEN: Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 9:30 a.m. (ST).

HOW: The board meeting will be webcast only, there will not be a public gathering of NTSB staff or board members. A link to the webcast will be available shortly before the start of the meeting at http://ntsb.windrosemedia.com/.



https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/NR20210201.aspx

​WASHINGTON (Feb. 1, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board announced Monday its intent to hold a public board meeting March 9, 2021, 9:30 a.m. (EST) to finalize its 2021 – 2022 Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements.

Do you love media relations?Would you like to work for one of the top 10 small agencies in the federal government?We're ...
01/25/2021

Do you love media relations?

Would you like to work for one of the top 10 small agencies in the federal government?

We're hiring for a non-supervisory, GS–1035–14, position on the NTSB’s media relations team. To learn more about our ideal candidate and how to apply read the posting on USAJOBS.

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/590147300

We’ve spent 50+ years investigating PTC-preventable collisions and derailments and advocating for this life-saving techn...
01/14/2021
NTSB Most Wanted List: Positive Train Control Implementation

We’ve spent 50+ years investigating PTC-preventable collisions and derailments and advocating for this life-saving technology. PTC has been on the #NTSBmwl almost every year since 1990. Here’s a snapshot of all the work we’ve done to get these safety recommendations implemented.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IK0qNiqOWiI

This video highlights the NTSB’s more than 50 year effort in investigating PTC-preventable accidents and advocacy for this life-saving technology.

News Release: NTSB Closes 3 Key Positive Train Control Safety Recommendations WASHINGTON (Jan. 14, 2021) — The National ...
01/14/2021
NTSB Closes 3 Key Positive Train Control Safety Recommendations

News Release: NTSB Closes 3 Key Positive Train Control Safety Recommendations

WASHINGTON (Jan. 14, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday it would close three key positive train control safety recommendations after the nation’s railroads met the Dec. 31, 2020, deadline for compliance.

The recommendations to Metra, Canadian National Railway Corp. and CSX Transportation are related to installing PTC, the safety technology that prevents equipped trains from colliding, missing signals or speeding. The recommendations will be classified “closed – acceptable action.”

The NTSB has called for PTC for more than 50 years. Positive train control has long been a key advocacy issue for the independent federal safety agency and is on the NTSB’s 2019-2020 Most Wanted List of transportation safety improvements.

The first of the 154 PTC-preventable accidents the agency investigated was in Darien, Connecticut, in 1969. The last was Carey, Ohio, in 2019.

“I’ve seen up close the devastation and heartbreak a rail catastrophe brings,” said NTSB Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt, who has been a board member on scene for 36 transportation accidents, including four that would have been prevented if PTC were in place. “We will silently mark our success with every train crash prevented, every life saved by this technology.”

The NTSB recommended CSX install a PTC system after a Feb. 16, 1996, collision between Amtrak and a Maryland Rail Commuter passenger trains on CSX tracks near Silver Spring, Maryland. Three operating crewmembers and eight passengers on the MARC train were killed in the derailment and subsequent fire.

The recommendation to Metra resulted from a 2003 overspeed derailment that injured 47 on Oct. 12, 2003. The train was traveling 68 mph in a 10 mph zone.

The NTSB issued the recommendation to Canadian National after two CN freight trains collided head on in Anding, Mississippi, on July 10, 2005. Four crewmembers were killed and 15,000 gallons of diesel fuel were released from the locomotives, resulting in a fire that burned for 15 hours.

Positive train control compliance will formally remain on the current Most Wanted List until March, when the NTSB will decide on a new list of transportation improvements. The board could vote to remove PTC from the list then.

Also Thursday, NTSB Board Member Jennifer Homendy moderated a live discussion with Sumwalt and three of his predecessors to reflect on the 50-year-long march to PTC implementation. The discussion also featured a panel of investigators and staff who discussed the professional and personal challenges of responding to some of the 154 PTC-preventable accidents the agency has investigated.

The event will be archived shortly on ntsb.gov and on the NTSB YouTube channel.

https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/NR20210114.aspx

​WASHINGTON (Jan. 14, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday it would close three key positive train control safety recommendations after the nation’s railroads met the Dec. 31, 2020, deadline for compliance.

REMINDER - today, January 14, we will hold a virtual discussion moderated by Member Jennifer Homendy and featuring Chair...
01/14/2021

REMINDER - today, January 14, we will hold a virtual discussion moderated by Member Jennifer Homendy and featuring Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt and former NTSB Chairmen Chris Hart, Deborah Hersman, and Jim Hall and NTSB staff. The discussion will highlight the history of Positive Train Control and celebrate the progress and the benefits of this lifesaving technology.

https://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/Pages/2021-ptc-mwl-webinar.aspx

#NTSBmwl #NTSB #leadership #rail #railindustry #trains

Today, we issued four safety recommendations based on findings contained in our NEW Safety Report, “Safety Risks to Emer...
01/13/2021
Lithium-Ion Battery Fires in Electric Vehicles - Safety Risks to Emergency Responders

Today, we issued four safety recommendations based on findings contained in our NEW Safety Report, “Safety Risks to Emergency Responders from Lithium-Ion Battery Fires in Electric Vehicles,” which documents our investigation of electric vehicle fires involving high-voltage, lithium-ion battery fires.

We identified two main safety issues through our investigation:
- The inadequacy of vehicle manufacturers’ emergency response guides.
- The gaps in safety standards and research related to high-voltage lithium-ion batteries involved in high-speed, high-severity crashes.

The Safety Report is available at https://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-studies/Documents/SR2001.pdf.

Also, check out the companion video which summarizes the findings in our report and focuses on the safety risks to first- and second-responders posed by electric vehicles that are powered by high-voltage, lithium-ion batteries.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6eS6JzBn0k

WASHINGTON (Jan. 13, 2021) ­– The National Transportation Safety Board issued Safety Report 20/01 “Safety Risks to Emergency Responders from Lithium-Ion Batt...

News Release: Calabasas, California, Helicopter Crash Subject of NTSB Meeting​WASHINGTON (Jan 13, 2021) — The National T...
01/13/2021
Calabasas, California, Helicopter Crash Subject of NTSB Meeting

News Release: Calabasas, California, Helicopter Crash Subject of NTSB Meeting

​WASHINGTON (Jan 13, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board announced Wednesday its intent to hold a public board meeting Feb. 9, 2021, 9:30 a.m. (EST), to determine the probable cause of the fatal, Jan. 26, 2020, helicopter crash near Calabasas, California.

The Sikorsky S-76B helicopter collided with hilly terrain and was destroyed by impact forces and fire. The pilot and eight passengers were fatally injured. The helicopter operated by Island Express Helicopters Inc., was on an on-demand passenger, visual flight rules flight, from John Wayne-Orange County Airport, Santa Ana, California, to Camarillo Airport, Camarillo, California.

In keeping with established federal and local social distancing guidelines to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, while also ensuring the NTSB’s compliance with the Government in the Sunshine Act, the board meeting for this investigation will be webcast to the public, with the board members and investigative staff meeting virtually. There will be no physical gathering to facilitate the board meeting.

WHO: NTSB investigative staff and board members.

WHAT: A webcast of a virtual board meeting.

WHEN: Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021, 9:30 a.m. (EST).

HOW: The board meeting will be webcast only, there will not be a public gathering of NTSB investigative staff or board members. A link to the webcast will be available shortly before the start of the meeting at http://ntsb.windrosemedia.com/.

MEDIA AVAILABILITY: NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt is scheduled to hold a virtual media availability at 2 p.m. (EST), to answer questions about the board meeting, the NTSB’s investigation of the accident, and the safety recommendations issued by the board.

The virtual media availability with Chairman Sumwalt will be conducted using Microsoft Teams. Journalists who RSVP to [email protected] will receive an email with the link and information about how the availability will be conducted. A recording of the availability will be made available on the NTSB’s YouTube channel as soon as practicable.

https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/NR20210113b.aspx

​WASHINGTON (Jan 13, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board announced Wednesday its intent to hold a public board meeting Feb. 9, 2021, 9:30 a.m. (EST), to determine the probable cause of the fatal, Jan. 26, 2020, helicopter crash near Calabasas, California.

01/13/2021
www.ntsb.gov

News Release: Risks to Emergency Responders from High-Voltage, Lithium-Ion Battery Fires Addressed in Safety Report

​WASHINGTON (Jan. 13, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board issued four safety recommendations Wednesday based on findings contained in Safety Report 20/01 which documents the agency’s investigation of four electric vehicle fires involving high-voltage, lithium-ion battery fires.

Three of the lithium-ion batteries that ignited were damaged in high-speed, high-severity crashes, and the fourth lithium-ion battery fire occurred during normal vehicle operations. All three of the crash-damaged batteries reignited after firefighters extinguished the vehicle fires. The battery in the fourth investigation did not reignite.

Safety Report 20/01 identified two main safety issues through its investigation:

The inadequacy of vehicle manufacturers’ emergency response guides.

The gaps in safety standards and research related to high-voltage lithium-ion batteries involved in high-speed, high-severity crashes.

Actions sought by the NTSB in the four safety recommendations issued Wednesday include:

Factoring the availability of a manufacturer’s emergency response guide, and its adherence to International Organization for Standardization standard 17840 and SAE International recommended practice J2990, when determining a U.S. New Car Assessment Program score.

Continued research on ways to mitigate or deenergize stranded energy in high-voltage lithium-ion batteries.

Continued research on ways to reduce the hazards associated with thermal runaway resulting from high-speed, high-severity crashes.
Manufacturer emergency response guides modeled on ISO standard 17840 and SAE International recommended practice J2990.

Incorporation of vehicle-specific information in emergency response guides for:
Fighting high-voltage lithium-ion battery fires.
-Mitigating thermal runaway and the risk of high-voltage lithium-ion battery reignition.
-Mitigating risks associated with stranded energy in high-voltage lithium-ion batteries during emergency response and before a damaged electric vehicle is removed from the scene.
-Safely storing an electric vehicle with a damaged high-voltage lithium-ion battery.

Providing information and available guidance to first responders and other crash scene workers about fire risks associated with high-voltage lithium-ion battery fires in electric vehicles.

Fires in electric vehicles powered by high-voltage lithium-ion batteries pose the risk of electric shock to emergency responders from exposure to the high-voltage components of a damaged lithium-ion battery. A further risk is that damaged cells in the battery can experience thermal runaway – uncontrolled increases in temperature and pressure – which can lead to battery reignition. The risks of electric shock and battery reignition/fire arise from the “stranded” energy that remains in a damaged battery.

The National Transportation Safety Board has an interest in the safety of emerging technology, including alternative vehicle fuel sources such as lithium-ion batteries. Safety issues with the high-voltage, lithium-ion batteries used in electric vehicles first gained widespread attention when a Chevrolet Volt caught fire three weeks after a crash test in May 2011.

The NTSB’s first investigation of electric vehicle battery fires on US roadways was in 2017, when a high-voltage lithium-ion battery caught fire after an electric vehicle left the road and crashed into a residential garage at high speed.

Between 2017 and 2018 the NTSB investigated two other electric vehicle high-speed, high-severity crashes that resulted in post-crash fires and one non-crash fire. During the course of its investigations, the NTSB considered the safety risks to first and second responders posed by the vehicles’ high-voltage, lithium-ion batteries. Those risks are addressed in the NTSB’s Safety Report 20/01, “Safety Risks to Emergency Responders from Lithium-Ion Battery Fires in Electric Vehicles.”

To highlight the lessons learned in Safety Report 20/01 the NTSB produced a short video that is available on the NTSB’s YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6eS6JzBn0k.

Safety Report 20/01 is available online at https://go.usa.gov/xAEyP.

https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/NR20210113.aspx
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MEDIA ADVISORY: Positive Train Control: 50 Years of NTSB AdvocacyFormer Chairs and Rail Investigators Discuss the Histor...
01/11/2021
MEDIA ADVISORY: Positive Train Control: 50 Years of NTSB Advocacy

MEDIA ADVISORY: Positive Train Control: 50 Years of NTSB Advocacy

Former Chairs and Rail Investigators Discuss the Historic Safety Achievement

WASHINGTON (Jan. 11, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board is scheduled to present a virtual live discussion with agency heads past and present on the full implementation of Positive Train Control Thursday, January 14, starting at 1 p.m.

It has been more than 50 years since NTSB first called for the implementation of positive train control technology. All railroads required to implement PTC met the final deadline of December 31, 2020. This discussion will look at the history of PTC, explore the future of rail safety and celebrate the progress and benefits of this lifesaving technology.

WHAT: First panel will feature NTSB Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt and three past NTSB chairs discussing the NTSB’s role in the PTC debate. A second, 90-minute session features NTSB staff reflecting on the professional and personal challenges of responding to the 154 PTC-preventable accidents the NTSB has investigated.

The event will be moderated by NTSB Board Member Jennifer Homendy.

WHO: First session (60 minutes):
• NTSB Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt
• Former Chairman Christopher A. Hart
• Former Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman
• Former Chairman James E. Hall

Second session (90 minutes):
• Rail investigators
• Family assistance specialist
• Safety advocate
• Crash-scene photographer
• Other Go-Team members

WHEN: Thursday, January 14, 1 p.m. EST

HOW: The live discussion will be webcast only, there will not be a public gathering. A link to the webcast will be available shortly before the start of the meeting at http://ntsb.windrosemedia.com/.

https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/20210111.aspx

WASHINGTON (Jan. 11, 2021) — The National Transportation Safety Board is scheduled to present a virtual live discussion with agency heads past and present on the full implementation of Positive Train Control Thursday, January 14, starting at 1 p.m.

Address

490 L'Enfant Plz SW
Washington D.C., DC
20594

NTSB welcomes your comments. To encourage free-flowing discussion while maintaining the decorum appropriate to a taxpayer-funded organization, we will moderate comments using these guidelines: Please keep comments relevant. Irrelevant, inappropriate or offensive comments may be edited and/or deleted. Stay on topic. Other readers expect the comments about a post to deal with the topic at hand. If your comment is not relevant to the post, please post it as a Discussion topic. No personal attacks. Criticism of decision-making and operational management, including the names of the individuals involved, is legitimate. Criticism on a purely personal level is not. No profanity. No spam. No sexually explicit or discriminatory material. Comments about politics and politicians must, like everything else, be on-topic and free from personal attacks.

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