Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site This is the official page of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, a unit of the National Park Service. The Frederick Douglass National Historic Site preserves and interprets Cedar Hill, where Frederick Douglass lived from 1877 until his death in 1895.
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Born into slavery, Douglass escaped to spend his life fighting for justice and equality for all people. His tireless struggle, brilliant words, and inclusive vision of humanity continue to inspire and sustain people today.

Mission: The National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the national park system for the enjoyment, education and inspiration of this and future generations. The Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout this country and the world.

Operating as usual

It is said that the colored man is ignorant, and therefore he should not vote. In saying this, you laid down a rule for ...
11/13/2020

It is said that the colored man is ignorant, and therefore he should not vote. In saying this, you laid down a rule for the black man that you apply to no other class of your citizens. I will hear nothing of degradation nor of ignorance against the black man. If he knows enough to be hanged, he knows enough to vote. If he knows an honest man from a thief, he knows much more than some of our white voters. If he knows as much when sober as an Irishman knows when drunk, he knows enough to vote. If he knows enough to take up arms in defense of this government, and bear his breast to the storm of rebel artillery, he knows enough to vote.
Speech “Emancipation, Racism, And the Work Before Us,”
December 4, 1863, Douglas papers, ser. 3, 3:604

It is said that the colored man is ignorant, and therefore he should not vote. In saying this, you laid down a rule for ...
11/13/2020

It is said that the colored man is ignorant, and therefore he should not vote. In saying this, you laid down a rule for the black man that you apply to no other class of your citizens. I will hear nothing of degradation nor of ignorance against the black man. If he knows enough to be hanged, he knows enough to vote. If he knows an honest man from a thief, he knows much more than some of our white voters. If he knows as much when sober as an Irishman knows when drunk, he knows enough to vote. If he knows enough to take up arms in defense of this government, and bear his breast to the storm of rebel artillery, he knows enough to vote.
Speech “Emancipation, Racism, And the Work Before Us,”
December 4, 1863, Douglass Papers, ser. 3, 3:604

Check out this #Bible that was given to Mr. Douglass by the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church here in Washington, D.C. on Septe...
11/13/2020

Check out this #Bible that was given to Mr. Douglass by the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church here in Washington, D.C. on September 1, 1889. The members gave Mr. Douglass a farwell reception before his departure to Haiti, where he had been appointed by President Benjamin Harrison to serve as U.S. Minister and Consul General. Embossed with his name on the front cover, this handsome, leather-bound edition was published by Oxford University Press and contains both the Old and New Testaments. According to the Washington Evening Star, "Mr. Douglass warmly and eloquently thanked the donors for their kindness."

Former Attorney General of the U.S. Loretta Lynch used this Bible to take her oath of office on June 17, 2015. #FrederickDouglass #FeatureFriday #History

On this #VeteransDay, we pause to pay tribute to all who have proudly worn our Nation’s uniform. These men and women sel...
11/11/2020

On this #VeteransDay, we pause to pay tribute to all who have proudly worn our Nation’s uniform. These men and women selflessly placed lives, well‑being, and security of others before their own.

We remember two of Frederick Douglass’ sons, Charles and Lewis, who traveled to Massachusetts to join the 54th Infantry in April 1863. Charles transferred to the 5th Massachusetts Cavalry to become its 1st sergeant. Lewis was the sergeant major of the 54th and was wounded in the assault on Fort Wagner. #LewisDouglass #CharlesDouglass #CivilWar #UnionArmy #History

Looking for a way to celebrate #VeteransDay tomorrow? Check out some of these offerings.
11/10/2020

Looking for a way to celebrate #VeteransDay tomorrow? Check out some of these offerings.

To honor our nation’s veterans, Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site will collaborate with several National Park Service sites to host virtual programming on November 11, 2020 beginning at 8:00 am CST.

We look forward to seeing you there!
#Veterans #Military

10/12/2020
Discussing Douglass: Robert E. Lee

October 12 marks the 150th Anniversary of the death of Robert E. Lee. Frederick Douglass had a lot to say on this subject. Check out our conversation with Codie Eash - Writer and Historian who has extensively researched Douglass's reaction and commentary on the passing of Lee. On this date 150 years ago, when Douglass got the news -- where did his thoughts lead him, and (to Douglass) how should we be remembering Lee and other prominent folks like him who led the Confederacy?

10/09/2020

October 12 marks the 150th Anniversary of the death of Robert E. Lee. Check out Codie Eash - Writer and Historian to discuss the thoughts of Frederick Douglass on the significance of Lee's passing.

10/09/2020

We will premiere a film on Mr. Douglass and the Black Vote during Reconstruction.

Today’s #GoogleDoodle celebrates the 197th anniversary of the birth of #MaryAnnShaddCary, an #abolitionist and #suffragi...
10/09/2020
Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site

Today’s #GoogleDoodle celebrates the 197th anniversary of the birth of #MaryAnnShaddCary, an #abolitionist and #suffragist, who, among other accomplishments, is known as the first African American female newspaper editor in North America. She had a lot in common with our beloved Mr. Douglass!

She also has a connection to #DCHistory, moving to the nation’s capital and attending Howard University School of Law, graduating at the age of sixty. Her home located in the historic U Street Corridor at 1421 W Street, N.W. was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976. #ImbibeIt #History #BlackWomensHistory #HU

It's #TriviaTuesday!  Did you know that while living at Cedar Hill Douglass returned to Maryland's Eastern Shore to see ...
10/06/2020

It's #TriviaTuesday! Did you know that while living at Cedar Hill Douglass returned to Maryland's Eastern Shore to see the scenes of his enslavement? Among his priorities was to identify the location of a cabin where he was likely born. Finding a spot that he believed was the area (near today's Tappers Corner, MD), Mr. Douglass collected soil from the first ground upon which he trod and the ground his grandmother, Betsey, and many other enslaved lived and, perhaps, died. A priceless personal treasure, Douglass brought that soil back to Washington, DC with him where he buried it on the property of his home, Cedar Hill. His property, today known as the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, therefore contains the soil upon which he was born, as well as the soil upon which the great Douglass passed.

The Reconstruction Period started from as early as 1863 until 1877. Blacks understood to be successful they had to have ...
10/02/2020

The Reconstruction Period started from as early as 1863 until 1877. Blacks understood to be successful they had to have the right to:

-vote
-educate themselves
-own property
-negotiate their own work contract

Mr. Douglass talked about the Black vote at the same time he was pushing for Blacks in the military. We do not discuss the Reconstruction Period much; there was no sesquicentennial celebrations as there were for the Civil War. Yet, Mr. Douglass was very influential during the period. The Reconstruction Period affects us today. Two questions for our devoted guests:

What do you know about the Period of Reconstruction?

What would you like us to address as it pertains to this period?

It's #TriviaTuesday!  Frederick Douglass chose his own birthdate (February 14), since the system of enslavement stole th...
09/29/2020

It's #TriviaTuesday! Frederick Douglass chose his own birthdate (February 14), since the system of enslavement stole that information from him. Did you know that not only did he not know the day of his birth, Douglass spent most of his life not aware of what year? For much of his life he estimated 1817 as his year of birth. Douglass commented, "I have no accurate knowledge of my age, never having seen any authentic record containing it."

His enslaver, Aaron Anthony, had an "authentic record," which Douglass most likely never saw. On these documents, can you find the only known record marking his birth? As you search the names recorded, remember Douglass was not his name at birth.

Image Caption: Aaron Anthony's ledger, Maryland State Archives

09/26/2020

Take a glimpse into the space where Frederick Douglass wrote and first previewed his January 9, 1894 speech on lynching, "The Lessons of the Hour."

National Park Service
09/26/2020

National Park Service

National parks are offering free admission in honor of National Public Lands Day-- the country’s biggest celebration of the great outdoors! In addition to environmental stewardship activities, many events encourage the use of public lands for education, recreation, and health benefits. Parks play a vital role in personal physical and mental well-being. Experience it firsthand with a paddle trip, hike, bike ride, history tour, art lesson, or even yoga in a park.

Find a park near you at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/public-lands-day.htm

Image: Ranger hat at Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park, Ohio.

#FindYourPark #NPLD #RecreateResponsibly

We join our friends at the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site in remembering the birthday of #Mary...
09/23/2020

We join our friends at the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site in remembering the birthday of #MaryChurchTerrell. She battled for justice alongside Frederick Douglass in his final years, and - after his death - played a key role in the preservation of his home, Cedar Hill.

Mrs. Terrell is one of several who guided the National Association of Colored Women in the care of what eventually became known as the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.

Happy Birthday, and Thank You for your efforts, Mrs. Terrell!

#MaryChurchTerrell—the venerable educator, suffragist, and civil rights leader, was born 157 years ago today in Memphis, Tennessee.

Mrs. Terrell was a frequent visitor at the Council House during its “hey day”. In fact, she was present at the founding meeting of the National Council of Negro Women, Inc. in 1935 and served as the organization’s first elected historian. #OTD #ImbibeIt #HappyBirthday #History #WomensHistory #BlackWomensHistory #NCNW #NACW #DCHistory #LiftingAsWeClimb #DCPSHistory #FindYourPark #VotesForWomen

📸 credit: Smithsonian Institution, Archives Center, NMAH

09/22/2020
Discussing Douglass: Abraham Lincoln

On September 22, 1863 President Abraham Lincoln issued the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. On that anniversary - Tuesday, September 22 at 12pm EST/11am CST - watch here for an extended conversation where Frederick Douglass National Historic Site staff speak with Lincoln scholars from Ford's Theatre & President Lincoln's Cottage on the relationship between Frederick Douglass & Abraham Lincoln.

09/22/2020
Discussing Douglass: Abraham Lincoln

On September 22, 1862 President Abraham Lincoln issued the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. On the anniversary -- this Tuesday September 22 at 12pm EST/11am CST - watch here for an extended conversation between Frederick Douglass National Historic Site staff and Lincoln scholars from Ford's Theatre & President Lincoln's Cottage, where they discuss the relationship between Douglass and Lincoln.

09/20/2020

On September 22, 1862 President Abraham Lincoln issued the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. On the anniversary -- this Tuesday September 22 at 12pm EST/11am CST - watch here for an extended conversation between Frederick Douglass National Historic Site staff and Lincoln scholars from Ford's Theatre & President Lincoln's Cottage, where they discuss the relationship between Douglass and Lincoln.

09/19/2020
Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

On September 22, 1862 President Abraham Lincoln issued the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. On that anniversary - Tuesday, September 22 at 12pm EST/11am CST - watch here for an extended conversation where Frederick Douglass National Historic Site staff speak with Lincoln scholars from Ford's Theatre & President Lincoln's Cottage on the relationship between Frederick Douglass & Abraham Lincoln.

On September 22, 1863 President Abraham Lincoln issued the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. On that anniversary - Tuesday, September 22 at 12pm EST/11am CST - watch here for an extended conversation where Frederick Douglass National Historic Site staff speak with Lincoln scholars from Ford's Theatre & President Lincoln's Cottage on the relationship between Frederick Douglass & Abraham Lincoln.

09/18/2020
Frederick Douglass and the United States Colored Troops

Mr. Douglass was very instrumental in recruiting black men to fight in the Union army during the American Civil War. Over 209,000 men of color fought for both the Union army and navy. As a result of the efforts of African Americans during the conflict, Congress eventually authorized the use of black troops in the United States military.

09/18/2020

Mr. Douglass was very instrumental in recruiting black men to fight in the Union army during the American Civil War. Over 209,000 men of color fought for both the Union army and navy. As a result of the efforts of African Americans during the conflict, Congress eventually authorized the use of black troops in the United States military.

09/15/2020
Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

It's #TriviaTuesday! Did you know today is the 182nd Anniversary of the marriage of Anna Murray and Frederick Bailey? Less than two weeks after Frederick fled enslavement, Anna caught up with him in New York City. On this day - 182 years ago - they were married by Rev. James W. C. Pennington in the home of David Ruggles. They soon made plans to continue their journey into Massachusetts, where their last names changed to Douglass. They were married for 44 years.

In honor of their anniversary, re-visit our video highlighting the often overlooked Anna.

Anna Murray has always been overshadowed by her famous husband. She was much more than just the wife of a famous man. What do we know about her? This video - released on the 138th anniversary of her passing - sheds light on Ms. Anna Murray, drawing extensively on the words of her children. Who was this amazing woman? Let's learn more together!

From our friends at the James A. Garfield National Historic Site
09/11/2020

From our friends at the James A. Garfield National Historic Site

140 years ago today, famed orator and social reformer Frederick Douglass was in Madison, Indiana, campaigning for presidential candidate James A. Garfield.

Here is an article from the Madison Evening Courier, September 11, 1880:

Another Grand Rally!
An Outpouring of All Kinds of People,
To See the Parade and Hear Dalzell and Douglass

At the appointed hour last evening the Garfield Guards rallied, and the Battalion formed on Broadway. The parade was made upon Main Cross between Walnut street and the railroad bridge, and the Guards attracted the populace by their fine marching in their uniforms, with lamps trimmed and brightly burning. The Battalion broke ranks on Broadway and joined the multitude of people who surrounded the speakers' stand near Trinity Church. The stand was decorated with flags and illuminated with Chinese lanterns, and as the crowd assembled rockets, Roman candles, and red and green lights pierced the darkness with their brilliancy. Hon. Frederick Douglass was so fatigued, and the open air had so affected his voice, that he did not attempt to speak at the stand. Hon. J. M. Dalzell was introduced by Mr. M. C. Garber, Jr., and made a brief but earnest and telling speech. There was not an old soldier present who heard "Private" Dalzell but felt the force of his appeal to them for the points he made were supported by events of the war and attitude of the two parties since the boys in blue came back to peaceful homes.

Mr. Frank Anderson introduced Hon. Frederick Douglass, who excused himself from speaking in the open air, and invited those who desired to hear him to repair to the Court House. It is needless to state that the auditorium was soon filled to its capacity. The venerable hero was greeted with enthusiastic cheers on his appearance, and during his speech, for his voice came to him and he spoke with his wonted power. To every man who has not become blinded by prejudice, the appearance of Mr. Douglass is impressive. He has arisen from a condition of servitude in early life to the altitude occupied by the foremost statesmen and orators of the country, and as the representative of a people who toiled under the lash of a Southern Democracy he stands before the world - - self-educated, intelligent, eminent - - as proof that his race were worthy of the freedom given it by the Republican party. His speech last night was a powerful one. It contained so many convincing, logical points that any attempt to synopsize it would be futile with our limited space.

We congratulate the Republicans on the success of last night's demonstration, and look forward to other victories. Let the good work move on till it assumes the gigantic proportions and the irresistible force of a tidal wave!

09/11/2020
Douglass Meets Lincoln Pt. 3

Mr. Douglass met Mr. Lincoln for the third and final time on March 4, 1865. For Mr. Douglass, it was an all-day affair.

09/11/2020

Mr. Douglass met Mr. Lincoln for the third and final time on March 4, 1865. For Mr. Douglass, it was an all-day affair.

Happy Founder’s Day, #ASALH!
09/09/2020

Happy Founder’s Day, #ASALH!

#OTDIH

105 years ago today, Dr. Carter G. Woodson, George Cleveland Hall, James Stamps, A.L. Jackson, and William Hartgrove met at the Wabash YMCA in Chicago, Illinois for the purpose of creating of an organization to demonstrate to the world a truth that had been everywhere assaulted–that people of African descent had contributed significantly to the making of civilization and the movement of human history. They chose for the organization's name, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH).

Today, the organization is known as the ASALH: Association for the Study of African American Life and History, and we are proud to have them as our partner.

To learn more about #ASALH visit: www.asalh.org

Address

1411 W St SE
Washington D.C., DC
20020

By Metro Get off at the Anacostia stop on the Green Line and take the B2 bus in the direction of Mt. Rainier. There is a bus stop directly in front of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site at the corner of 14th and W streets. Continue along the sidewalk in the direction the bus is traveling until you reach the visitor center (15th and W Streets SE). By Bus The B2, 90, U2, 93, A42, A46, A48, P1, P2, and P6 all drop off within 2 blocks of the site. On Foot/Bike You can walk to the site (3/4 of a mile) from the metro. Get off at the Anacostia station and head towards the "busses" exit. Turn left after going through the turnstiles, then right on Howard Rd. Turn left at MLK Avenue, then right on W St. You can also walk/bike from downtown DC (3 miles) as the 11th St. Bridge has a sidewalk on it. Come over the bridge then take Good Hope Rd. away from the river. Turn right at 15th St and three blocks will bring you to the site.

General information

Welcome to the official page of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. We hope this will become a place where fans feel comfortable sharing information and experiences about the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site with one another. While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. Please be considerate of other fan's opinions. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. If you do not comply, your message will be removed. We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions, nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Such posts and/or links are subject to deletion. People who continue to post such content and/or links may be subject to page participation restrictions and/or removal from the page. We do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Posting of external links on this site that are intended as advertising (or to drive traffic to websites unrelated to the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site), or do not contribute to dialog and discussions about the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site may be deleted. People who continue to post such links may be subject to page participation restrictions and/or removal from the page. External links do not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. National Park Service or the U.S. Department of Interior.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
Sunday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(202) 426-5961

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