U.S. Army Center of Military History

U.S. Army Center of Military History Welcome to the U.S. Army's Center of Military History (CMH) page on Facebook, a place to connect, share, and tell us what you think. If you're looking for the official source of information about CMH, visit our homepage at http://www.history.army.mil

Operating as usual

WEDNESDAY WISDOM "It is not enough to fight. It is the spirit which we bring to the fight that decides the issue. It is ...
06/23/2021

WEDNESDAY WISDOM
"It is not enough to fight. It is the spirit which we bring to the fight that decides the issue. It is morale that wins the victory."

"The soldier's heart, the soldier's spirit, the soldier's soul, are everything."
-- George C. Marshall

#Armyhistory #USArmy

WEDNESDAY WISDOM
"It is not enough to fight. It is the spirit which we bring to the fight that decides the issue. It is morale that wins the victory."

"The soldier's heart, the soldier's spirit, the soldier's soul, are everything."
-- George C. Marshall

#Armyhistory #USArmy

WEDNESDAY WISDOM“The most important thing I learned is that soldiers watch what their leaders do. You can give them clas...
06/23/2021

WEDNESDAY WISDOM

“The most important thing I learned is that soldiers watch what their leaders do. You can give them classes and lecture them forever, but it is your personal example they will follow.”
– General Colin Powell

#Armyhistory #USArmy #ArmyHeritageMonth

WEDNESDAY WISDOM

“The most important thing I learned is that soldiers watch what their leaders do. You can give them classes and lecture them forever, but it is your personal example they will follow.”
– General Colin Powell

#Armyhistory #USArmy #ArmyHeritageMonth

TRIVIA TUESDAY - THE MINUTEMEN#armyhistory #usarmy #ArmyMuseumsSharing information from the newly reopened National Muse...
06/22/2021

TRIVIA TUESDAY - THE MINUTEMEN
#armyhistory #usarmy #ArmyMuseums

Sharing information from the newly reopened National Museum of the United States Army about the "Minutemen."

Capt. Isaac Davis, the inspiration for the statue “The Minutemen,” was a gunsmith and militia officer who fought at the Battle of Lexington and Concord. In April 1775, Capt. Davis and his militia company responded to a British raid on the town of Concord. Davis’ company led an attack across the bridge into Concord when British forces opened fire on the approaching militia, killing Davis instantly. Visit the Founding the Nation Gallery to explore how Army History is America’s History.

https://www.thenmusa.org/exhibit/founding-the-nation/

#ArmyHeritage

21 - 22 JUNE 1942 - FORT STEVENS, OREGON ATTACKED BY JAPANESE SUBMARINE - #WWII#Armyhistory #USArmy In the middle of the...
06/21/2021

21 - 22 JUNE 1942 - FORT STEVENS, OREGON ATTACKED BY JAPANESE SUBMARINE - #WWII
#Armyhistory #USArmy

In the middle of the night of 21-22 June 1942, Imperial Japanese submarine I-25 surfaced near the mouth of the Columbia River and opened fire on Fort Stevens, the U.S. Army Coast Artillery Corps installation on the Oregon coast. Fort Stevens was one of three forts that constituted the Harbor Defense of the Columbia in Washington and Oregon.

The men of the 18th and 249th Coast Artillery Regiments went to their action stations, and manned the 10-inch mortar, 10- and 6-inch gun and searchlight batteries, or took position with rifles and machine guns to repulse an enemy landing.

The attack did not last long as the submarine fired 17 rounds from its single 5.5-inch (140 mm) deck gun. Although the men quickly loaded and reported "ready to fire," the post commander ordered a blackout of all lights, including the searchlights, and for Battery Russell's 10-inch disappearing guns not to engage lest they reveal their positions.

The Japanese shelling did only minor damage to the installation and caused no casualties. As the Japanese vessel withdrew, an Army Air Forces A-29 Hudson bomber on a routine training patrol spotted the submarine still on the surface and attacked. None of its bombs struck the target before the submarine submerged and escaped.

ALSO SEE

https://history.army.mil/html/books/072/72-1/index.html

https://oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=main.loadFile&load=_siteFiles%2Fpublications%2FFS_Battery_Russell_Brochure_LOW_RES074930.pdf

CHIEF'S HIGHLIGHTS - MODEL HUT - NATIONAL ARMY MUSEUMThis model hut in the Art of Soldiering Gallery, is a miniature rep...
06/21/2021
Chief's Highlights 11 Model Hut.mp4

CHIEF'S HIGHLIGHTS - MODEL HUT - NATIONAL ARMY MUSEUM
This model hut in the Art of Soldiering Gallery, is a miniature replica of a Civil War Soldiers quarters made while he was recovering from battle injuries.

#WorthTheWait #Armyhistory #USArmy

https://vimeo.com/565433188

This is "Chief's Highlights 11 Model Hut.mp4" by Center of Military History on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

21 JUNE 1860 - SIGNAL CORPS BRANCH BIRTHDAY#Armyhistory #USArmy #USArmysignalcorps In 1856, Assistant Surgeon (Captain) ...
06/21/2021

21 JUNE 1860 - SIGNAL CORPS BRANCH BIRTHDAY
#Armyhistory #USArmy #USArmysignalcorps

In 1856, Assistant Surgeon (Captain) Albert J. Myer, a medical officer stationed in Texas, proposed that the Army adopt the visual communications system he developed and named "aerial telegraphy," but more commonly called "Wigwag." After successful demonstration and application, the Army approved Meyer's proposal on 21 June 1860 and named him the first - and only - signal officer, with the grade of major.

Meyer was ordered to recruit and train personnel from within the Army, who were then detailed to the Signal Corps, and gave him a modest budget for the procurement of equipment. While Meyer had recommended the establishment of a separate, trained professional military service, the Signal Corps did not constitute an official organization until 3 March 1863, along with Meyers' promotion to the rank of colonel. By the end of the Civil War, approximately 2,900 officers and men had served in the Signal Corps.

With the U.S. Army's field forces covering long distances and dispersed over wide areas, Myer saw the need for electrical telegraphy for field communications. He developed and introduced a field telegraph train, composed of a wagon-transported telegraph, along with its necessary support equipment. The train also included the soldiers who operated the devices, transmitting Morse code messages over wires strung on poles erected by other members of the corps.

The end of the Civil War did not bring an end to Signal Corps missions and responsibilities. Signal Corps soldiers continued to play a vital role in the Army's history, and introduced numerous innovations in military communications including aeronautics, aviation, radar, radio-telephone equipment, as well as land, wireless and satellite communication, to name a few.

The Army Signal Corps continues to develop, test, provide, and manage communications and information systems support for the command and control of combined arms forces.

ALSO SEE

http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/030/30-17-1/index.html

http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-15-1/index.html

20 JUNE 1941 - U.S. ARMY AIR CORPS BECAME U.S. ARMY AIR FORCES#Armyhistory #USArmy On 2 July 1926, the Army Air Service ...
06/20/2021

20 JUNE 1941 - U.S. ARMY AIR CORPS BECAME U.S. ARMY AIR FORCES
#Armyhistory #USArmy

On 2 July 1926, the Army Air Service became the Army Air Corps, in recognition of the importance and expanded role of military aviation gained in World War I. The change gave the Air Corps permanence and the status of a combat arms branch, although its position in the War Department remained unchanged since flying units remained under the operational control of ground forces corps area commands.

The Air Corps was responsible for procurement and maintenance of aircraft, supply of units, and training of personnel. Despite the limitations, the corps grew in size and responsibility. Anticipating the importance of air power in the next war, it explored innovations in strategic bombing, air transport and tactical support of ground forces.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Major General Henry H. "Hap" Arnold as Chief of Air Corps on 29 September 1938, as the corps sought more autonomy, and the change to Army Air Forces in 1941 reflected this evolution.

The AAF administered all facets of military aviation within the Army, including controlling its own installations and support units, and the "Air Staff" status became equal to the General Staff. In December, Arnold assumed the title of Chief of the Army Air Forces with promotion to the rank of lieutenant general, equal to the commanding generals of the Army's other components. This title was changed to commanding general of Army Air Forces in 1942, with a seat on the joint chiefs of staff.

The AAF became a quasi-independent service under the War Department with control of all aspects of the air war and operations in every theater, determining policy, and issuing orders. The Army Air Corps continued as a branch of the Army under the Army Air Forces until the establishment of the U.S. Air Force as separate armed force in 1947.

ALSO SEE:

https://www.army.mil/aviation/airforces/

http://www.af.mil/About-Us/Biographies/Display/Article/107811/general-henry-h-arnold/

19 JUNE 1865 - JUNETEENTHAlso called Freedom Day, Juneteenth celebrates the emancipation of the enslaved people in Ameri...
06/19/2021

19 JUNE 1865 - JUNETEENTH

Also called Freedom Day, Juneteenth celebrates the emancipation of the enslaved people in America two and a half years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.

The #USArmy arrived in Galveston, TX with news that the #CivilWar and slavery had ended. Roughly 250,000 slaves gained their freedom.

Major General Gordon Granger and a contingent of U.S. Army soldiers. Granger’s mission was to occupy the formerly Confederate state of Texas in the aftermath of the Confederacy’s surrender. On 19 June, Granger read out a general order to the Black and White people of Galveston that “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free . . . this involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves.”

As we remember this day in history, let us come together, knowing that our people are our greatest strength.

#JUNETEENTH2021 #Armyhistory

19 JUNE 1865 - JUNETEENTH

Also called Freedom Day, Juneteenth celebrates the emancipation of the enslaved people in America two and a half years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.

The #USArmy arrived in Galveston, TX with news that the #CivilWar and slavery had ended. Roughly 250,000 slaves gained their freedom.

Major General Gordon Granger and a contingent of U.S. Army soldiers. Granger’s mission was to occupy the formerly Confederate state of Texas in the aftermath of the Confederacy’s surrender. On 19 June, Granger read out a general order to the Black and White people of Galveston that “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free . . . this involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves.”

As we remember this day in history, let us come together, knowing that our people are our greatest strength.

#JUNETEENTH2021 #Armyhistory

18 JUNE 1864 - SIEGE OF PETERSBURG BEGINS - #CivilWar #Armyhistory #USArmy In early June 1864, the final - and longest -...
06/18/2021

18 JUNE 1864 - SIEGE OF PETERSBURG BEGINS - #CivilWar
#Armyhistory #USArmy

In early June 1864, the final - and longest - Civil War campaign in the Eastern Theater began when U.S. Army forces in Virginia invested the Confederate capital at Richmond, and its army's main logistical base at Petersburg, from 4 June 1864 to 2 April 1865.

The Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee, was firmly entrenched near Richmond. Since the start of the Overland Campaign in the spring of 1864, Lee had blocked the advancing United States Army forces commanded by Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant as they attempted to outflank the rebels. Grant once again slipped around Lee's entrenched right flank and attempted to pry the rebels out of their trenches by striking at Petersburg, about thirty miles south of Richmond.

Petersburg was the key to Lee’s position, because it formed the junction of all the railways and main roads connecting the rebel capital with the rest of the South. In a move that took Lee by surprise, elements of Grant's army suddenly crossed the James River below Richmond with about 64,000 troops on 14 June. The next day his lead units reached Petersburg. The city was lightly defended, but the U.S. forces unaccountably delayed their attack, enabling Lee to send in substantial reinforcements. A U.S. assault on 18 June failed to pierce the Confederate defenses and cost Grant’s force 8,150 casualties.

At the end of July, U.S. sappers tunneled a great mine under the Confederate works and exploded it. The follow-up infantry assault at "The Crater" failed to exploit the huge but temporary breach in the Confederate line, and U.S. forces suffered another 4,000 casualties. Grant thereupon undertook siege operations which lasted until April 1865.

ALSO SEE

https://history.army.mil/html/books/075/75-16/index.html

http://www.lee.army.mil/

Be sure to join in this evening, June 17 at 7 p.m. EDT, to hear a story of the Army beyond the battlefield and how Soldi...
06/17/2021

Be sure to join in this evening, June 17 at 7 p.m. EDT, to hear a story of the Army beyond the battlefield and how Soldiers played a vital role in shaping the nation from 1775-1900.

For tickets to this FREE virtual event visit;
https://tickets.thenmusa.org/Info.aspx?EventID=12

#ArmyHeritage #Armyhistory #USArmy

On June 17 at 7 p.m. EDT, hear a story of the Army beyond the battlefield and how Soldiers played a vital role in shaping the nation from 1775-1900.

https://tickets.thenmusa.org/Info.aspx?EventID=12

#ArmyHeritage

17 JUNE 1775 - BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL - #RevolutionaryWar #Armyhistory #USArmy Unaware that Congress had voted to adopt t...
06/17/2021

17 JUNE 1775 - BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL - #RevolutionaryWar
#Armyhistory #USArmy

Unaware that Congress had voted to adopt them into the newly created Continental Army, on the night of 16 - 17 June 1775, about 1,200 soldiers of the New England Army of Observation took position on the Charlestown isthmus between the Charles and Mystic Rivers, to fortify Bunker Hill.

Working at night, they quickly built and manned entrenchments on nearby Breeds Hill instead. The next morning, 17 June, the British saw fortifications with walls six feet high astride Breed's Hill, and overlooking Boston from across the river. The British commander, Lieutenant General Thomas Gage, ordered the Royal Navy to ferry 2,200 troops under the command of Major General William Howe across the Charles River to clear the American force off of the peninsula.

Howe's infantry stormed the American positions on Breed's Hill with a frontal attack, but were met with withering musket fire that tore gaping holes in their well-dressed lines. After being repulsed in two attempts, Howe resolved to launch one more attack on the redoubt to avoid a costly defeat of British arms.

The Redcoats steadily pressed their advance and converged on the American forces in a three-column attack. As the Patriot soldiers ran out of ammunition, they used their muskets as clubs against the British bayonets to contest every inch of ground. The Americans were finally forced to retreat as British infantrymen swarmed over the redoubts and other defensive positions.

The hard-fighting British soldiers won the battle, but at a terrible price. General George Washington, newly commissioned by Congress as the “general and commander in chief” of the Continental Army formally assumed command of the besieging army on 3 July 1775.

Peter Salem, an African-American soldier, is traditionally credited with firing that shot that killed Major John Pitcairn of the British Marines. He should not be confused with Salem Poor, another well-known black Patriot who fought at Bunker Hill.

ALSO SEE:

http://www.history.army.mil/banner_images/focus/bunker_hill/bunker_hill.html

http://www.history.army.mil//html/books/070/70-6-1/index.html

06/17/2021
LPD 10

The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Leader Development Seminar today with Center of Military History Executive Director Charles R. Bowery, Jr. as guest speaker.

#Armyhistory U.S. Army

Join us later this morning for the TRADOC Leader Professional Development (LPD) live webinar today, 17 June 2021, 1100-1...
06/17/2021

Join us later this morning for the TRADOC Leader Professional Development (LPD) live webinar today, 17 June 2021, 1100-1200 eastern.

The TRADOC Deputy Chief of Staff, MG Daniel J. Christian, hosts Mr. Charles R. Bowery, Jr., Executive Director, U.S. Army Center of Military History who will lead a discussion titled Diversity, Inclusion, History, and Memory: America and Its Army.

#Armyhistory U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

Tune in with us this Thursday to hear from Mr. Charles R. Bowery Jr. as he discusses diversity in the Army's history tracing back to 1775 during the Civil War.

Read more about what Bowery will touch on in this month's LPD article:
https://go.usa.gov/x6R67

#VictoryStartsHere #ArmyHeritage

06/17/2021

Congrats to Jenna Bush Hager for jumping from 10,000 with the US Army Golden Knights to the National Museum of the United States Army this morning!! Thanks to the The Today Show for covering this event and highlighting America's Army Museum!!

#Armyhistory #USArmy #ArmyMuseums

17 JUNE 1775 - GEORGE WASHINGTON APPOINTED COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF - #RevolutionaryWar #Armyhistory #USArmy On 15 June 1775, ...
06/17/2021

17 JUNE 1775 - GEORGE WASHINGTON APPOINTED COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF - #RevolutionaryWar
#Armyhistory #USArmy

On 15 June 1775, the day after it had resolved to establish the army, the Continental Congress resolved “that a General be appointed to command all the Continental forces” (including the New England Army of Observation at Boston), and unanimously voted to appoint George Washington its “general and commander in chief.”

The next day, Friday, 16 June, the president of Congress informed George Washington of his selection, and the committee of the whole set about the business of laying the foundation for "the American army."

On Saturday, 17 June, Washington formally received his appointment and commission. Addressed from "The delegates of the United Colonies" assembled in the Continental Congress; "To George Washington, Esq." The Congress, “reposing special trust and confidence in the patriotism, valor, conduct, and fidelity” of George Washington, appointed him “General and Commander in chief of the Army of the United Colonies, and of all the forces now raised, or to be raised by them, and of all others who shall voluntarily offer their services, and join the Defense of American liberty, and for repelling every hostile invasion…”

17 JUNE 1775 - GEORGE WASHINGTON APPOINTED COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF - #RevolutionaryWar
#Armyhistory #USArmy

On 15 June 1775, the day after it had resolved to establish the army, the Continental Congress resolved “that a General be appointed to command all the Continental forces” (including the New England Army of Observation at Boston), and unanimously voted to appoint George Washington its “general and commander in chief.”

The next day, Friday, 16 June, the president of Congress informed George Washington of his selection, and the committee of the whole set about the business of laying the foundation for "the American army."

On Saturday, 17 June, Washington formally received his appointment and commission. Addressed from "The delegates of the United Colonies" assembled in the Continental Congress; "To George Washington, Esq." The Congress, “reposing special trust and confidence in the patriotism, valor, conduct, and fidelity” of George Washington, appointed him “General and Commander in chief of the Army of the United Colonies, and of all the forces now raised, or to be raised by them, and of all others who shall voluntarily offer their services, and join the Defense of American liberty, and for repelling every hostile invasion…”

Address

102 4th Avenue, Building 35
Washington D.C., DC
FORT MCNAIR, DC 20319-5060

General information

Please send any inquiries directly to CMH at [email protected] The U.S. Army Center of Military History has three divisions—History, Field Programs, and Museums. All have a presence at Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, D.C. The Museum Division also operates two storage and support facilities, Museum Support Center — Belvoir at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and Museum Support Center — Anniston at Anniston Army Dept. Alabama. The Army’s core art and historical collection is stored at Fort Belvoir. The future National Museum of the U.S. Army also will be located at Fort Belvoir. The U.S. Army and Heritage Center at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, operates a rotating exhibits gallery and houses archives and photographs in its Military History Institute. Other Army documents are housed at the National Archives. The Army Historical Foundation is a 501(c)(3) private not-for-profit educational organization, founded in 1983, located in Arlington, Virginia. Among other activities, it is conducting fundraising for the proposed National Museum of the U.S. Army.

Opening Hours

Monday 07:30 - 17:30
Tuesday 07:30 - 17:30
Wednesday 07:30 - 17:30
Thursday 07:30 - 17:30
Friday 07:30 - 17:30

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when U.S. Army Center of Military History posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to U.S. Army Center of Military History:

Videos

Nearby government services