Administration for Native Americans - ANA

Administration for Native Americans - ANA Founded in 1974, ANA promotes self-sufficiency for Native Americans by providing discretionary grant funding for community based projects, and training and technical assistance to eligible tribes and native organizations.

Operating as usual

Read the Administration for Children and Families’ Press Release on the Administration for Native Americans’ Domestic Vi...
01/21/2022
Media Room

Read the Administration for Children and Families’ Press Release on the Administration for Native Americans’ Domestic Violence Awareness Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign to support American Indian and Alaska Natives in prevention efforts in their communities and to provide survivors access to resources!

Press Releases/Blogs/Fact Sheets

According to the National Institute of Justice, approximately 83 percent of American Indian and Alaska Native adults hav...
01/19/2022
Domestic Violence Awareness Public Service Announcements

According to the National Institute of Justice, approximately 83 percent of American Indian and Alaska Native adults have experienced a form violence in their lifetime – whether it be s*xual violence, stalking, or physical violence and/or psychological aggression by an intimate partner.

To help mitigate the disproportionate level of violence experienced by Native Americans in the US, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) – a program office within the Administration of for Children and Families (ACF) – partnered with the Indian Health Service (IHS) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to develop a Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign on Domestic Violence Awareness. Go to ANA’s website to listen and share the six PSAs that provide resources on the following topics:

-Warning Signs and Prevention Skills
-Seeking Services for Survivors (youth-focused)
-Seeking Services for Survivors (male-focused)
-Seeking services for survivors (female-focused)
-Supporting Survivors and Responding to Domestic Violence
-Increasing Community Safety

Domestic Violence Awareness Public Service Announcements

In partnership with the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Admini...
01/18/2022
Domestic Violence Awareness Public Service Announcements

In partnership with the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) developed a Domestic Violence Awareness Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign to help mitigate the disproportionate level of violence experienced by Native Americans in the United States. The campaign includes six PSAs, tailored specifically for Native communities for the purposes of providing survivors access to resources and increasing prevention efforts on both the individual and community level. Go to ANA’s website to listen and share!

Domestic Violence Awareness Public Service Announcements

01/18/2022
Human Trafficking Hotline Web Chat

If you or someone you know has experienced #humantrafficking, help is here. The National Human Trafficking Hotline provides free, confidential help, 24/7. Call: 1-888-373-7888; Text: HELP to 233733 (BEFREE); or Chat: https://buff.ly/2MOFyUO

Spread the word to help #EndTrafficking

Web Chat When Advocates are available, the button to initiate a chat is active. En Español. Chat with an AdvocateNo Advocates are currently available. Please call 1-888-373-7888 or text BEFREE (233733). If you fear you are in immediate danger, contact 911 to receive the most immediate response. Not...

ICYMI: The White House released the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking on December 3, 2021. The Action Pla...
01/13/2022
FACT SHEET: The National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking (NAP) | The White House

ICYMI: The White House released the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking on December 3, 2021. The Action Plan calls upon agencies across the U.S. government to commit to actions that strengthen prevention of human trafficking, protect victims through intervention and support, and hold traffickers accountable through investigation and prosecution. https://buff.ly/3eZPnu0

#EndTrafficking
#humantraffickingawarenessmonth

Globally, an estimated 25 million people are subjected to human trafficking and forced labor, which is responsible for an estimated $150 billion annually

President Biden shared his proclamation supporting awareness in issues surrounding Human Trafficking Prevention Month. R...
01/11/2022
A Proclamation on National Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2022 | The White House

President Biden shared his proclamation supporting awareness in issues surrounding Human Trafficking Prevention Month. Read, share and be aware!
#endtrafficking
#humantraffickingawarenessmonth

Human trafficking -- whether in the form of forced labor, s*x trafficking, or other offenses -- is an abhorrent abuse of power and a profoundly immoral

Today is #HumanTraffickingAwarenessDay. Join the Administration For Native Americans in helping to raise awareness of hu...
01/11/2022

Today is #HumanTraffickingAwarenessDay. Join the Administration For Native Americans in helping to raise awareness of human trafficking by sharing a post with friends and family wearing blue on social media. Don't forget to #WearBlueDay and tag Administration for Native Americans - ANA!

#endtrafficking

Today is #HumanTraffickingAwarenessDay. Join the Administration For Native Americans in helping to raise awareness of human trafficking by sharing a post with friends and family wearing blue on social media. Don't forget to #WearBlueDay and tag Administration for Native Americans - ANA!

#endtrafficking

Tomorrow, January 11, is #WearBlueDay in recognition of Human Trafficking Awareness Day. In observance of #HumanTraffick...
01/10/2022

Tomorrow, January 11, is #WearBlueDay in recognition of Human Trafficking Awareness Day. In observance of #HumanTraffickingAwarenessMonth this January, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) wants you too to wear blue!

Help raise awareness by sharing a post with friends and family wearing blue along with the #WearBlueDay hashtag and tag Administration for Native Americans - ANA.

#endtrafficking

Tomorrow, January 11, is #WearBlueDay in recognition of Human Trafficking Awareness Day. In observance of #HumanTraffickingAwarenessMonth this January, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) wants you too to wear blue!

Help raise awareness by sharing a post with friends and family wearing blue along with the #WearBlueDay hashtag and tag Administration for Native Americans - ANA.

#endtrafficking

12/09/2021
www.whitehouse.gov

On December, 3, 2021, the White House released the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking, advancing a comprehensive anti-trafficking agenda by strengthening prevention efforts, protecting individuals who have experienced trafficking through intervention and support, and holding traffickers accountable through prosecution. Learn how the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking will support efforts to address this issue with Native American populations by reviewing the action plan today!

Learn about building and improving facilities for early care and education in tribal communities! Join the Administratio...
12/09/2021
Welcome! You are invited to join a meeting: Tribal Early Childhood Webinar: Building and Improving Facilities for Early Care and Education in Tribal Communities. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the meeting.

Learn about building and improving facilities for early care and education in tribal communities! Join the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) on Monday, December 13 @ 2:30 pm EST for ACF’s next installment of the tribal early childhood webinar series that cover topics related to implementation and coordination of early childhood programs in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. During this webinar, participants will hear an overview of issues related to building and improving facilities for early care and education, followed by a panel highlighting innovations and promising practices being implemented in tribal communities. Register at the link below!

Please join this Administration for Children and Families (ACF) webinar to learn about approaches to building and improving facilities for early care and education in tribal communities. This webinar is part of a series of webinars on topics related to implementation and coordination of early childh...

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, the Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library is partnering with the National Cen...
11/17/2021
Meeting Registration - Zoom

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, the Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library is partnering with the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC’s American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian Coalition, and Office of Equal Employment Opportunity to read selections from The Star Collection today at 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST! The Star Collection books for young American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) readers features and celebrates feeling connected to culture and community and having positive relationships with others that are safe, stable, and nurturing. As part of this series development, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) supported the CDC in identifying Native language translators for the Star Collection Books, which now have selected words translated in Cherokee, Lakota, Navajo, Ojibwe, and Yupik. Illustrator and co-writer Marisa Erven of the Coquille Tribe of Oregon will read The Friendship Makers and Stars that Connect Us, written for children in grades K-3 during today’s event! The Star Collection is also available at the CDC Library or online. Today’s event is open to the public and all ages are welcome to join! Register at the link below to join the event today

This Veterans Day, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) honors all the men and women, past and present, who hav...
11/11/2021

This Veterans Day, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) honors all the men and women, past and present, who have served in the U.S. military. Today we highlight Mr. Peter MacDonald, one of the last living Navajo Code Talkers. Inspired to join the military because of the “beautiful blue” Marine Corps uniform, Mr. MacDonald enlisted at 15 years old in 1944. In 1942, 29 Navajo men, now known as the Navajo Code Talkers, created an unbreakable code based on the intricate and oral Navajo language that was deployed across the Pacific during World War II. The Navajo Code Talkers participated in all major U.S. Marine operations in the Pacific from 1942-1945 – transmitting secret communications by telephone and radio in their native language that were never deciphered during the war. Mr. MacDonald attributed his Navajo culture’s emphasis on its youth learning and memorizing Navajo creation stories, songs, and prayers in helping the Code Talkers become so successful in communicating in the Navajo Code that saved countless lives in World War WII.

Did you know that Native Americans continue to serve at a higher rate than any other ethnic group in the United States? For more than two centuries, Native American have served and continue to serve in the U.S. military – including the brave Native American Code Talkers in World War I and World II, just like Peter MacDonald. Check out President Biden’s Proclamation on National Native American Heritage Month, where the president also honors our Native American veterans past and present.
https://buff.ly/3bvRwf9

This Veterans Day, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) honors all the men and women, past and present, who have served in the U.S. military. Today we highlight Mr. Peter MacDonald, one of the last living Navajo Code Talkers. Inspired to join the military because of the “beautiful blue” Marine Corps uniform, Mr. MacDonald enlisted at 15 years old in 1944. In 1942, 29 Navajo men, now known as the Navajo Code Talkers, created an unbreakable code based on the intricate and oral Navajo language that was deployed across the Pacific during World War II. The Navajo Code Talkers participated in all major U.S. Marine operations in the Pacific from 1942-1945 – transmitting secret communications by telephone and radio in their native language that were never deciphered during the war. Mr. MacDonald attributed his Navajo culture’s emphasis on its youth learning and memorizing Navajo creation stories, songs, and prayers in helping the Code Talkers become so successful in communicating in the Navajo Code that saved countless lives in World War WII.

Did you know that Native Americans continue to serve at a higher rate than any other ethnic group in the United States? For more than two centuries, Native American have served and continue to serve in the U.S. military – including the brave Native American Code Talkers in World War I and World II, just like Peter MacDonald. Check out President Biden’s Proclamation on National Native American Heritage Month, where the president also honors our Native American veterans past and present.
https://buff.ly/3bvRwf9

Webinar alert! Hear directly from members of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA) – the grant recipient of th...
11/10/2021
Webinar Registration - Zoom

Webinar alert! Hear directly from members of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA) – the grant recipient of the ANA-funded Unangam Tunuu Achigaasalix – Teaching our Aleut Language project. APIA will be sharing the project’s efforts in maintaining progress during the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure that the Unangax people in Anchorage, Alaska and 13 remote communities are engaged in learning Unangax tunuu, the Unanga language. Join the Keeping Native Language Alive During a Pandemic webinar this Friday, November 12 at 2:00 EST by registering through this link below:

Support American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Pacific Islander native language learning by joining the Administratio...
11/10/2021
2021 National Native American Language Summit (Virtual)

Support American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Pacific Islander native language learning by joining the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) for the 8th National Native American Language Summit to discuss the challenges and pathways to success in teaching and preserving Native languages! The summit will be held from 2:00 – 6:00 pm EST on November 18 & 19. Register at the link below!

Join us as we identify ways to further support Native Communities Leading and Taking Control of their Native Languages .

We want to hear your thoughts on equity! The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) invites you and your Native ...
11/08/2021
Equity In Action Listening Session: Native Communities [NOW CLOSED]

We want to hear your thoughts on equity! The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) invites you and your Native community to share your lived experiences and ideas for how the agency and its program offices can improve diversity, equity, and inclusion in relationship with Native and Tribal communities. Please join us today November 8, 2021 at 3:00 pm EST by registering at the link below:

*Registration for the live listening session is now closed.* Written testimony is still being accepted until 11/30/2021 to [email protected]. To receive additional information and prompts for feedback, please leave your contact information below. The Administration for Children and Families (AC...

Webinar alert today! Join the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) today in celebrating Native American Herita...
11/08/2021
Welcome! You are invited to join a meeting: Promoting Equity and Celebrating Resilience in Tribal Early Childhood Programs – 2 Part Series. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the meeting.

Webinar alert today! Join the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) today in celebrating Native American Heritage Month by attending the first of ACF’s two-part webinar series focused on promoting equity in tribal early childhood programs and celebrating the resilience and creativity of tribal communities as they serve American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) children and families. Register at the link below for Part 1 of the Series happing today November 8, 2021, 2:30-4:00 pm ET.

Part 1: In celebration of November’s Native American Heritage Month, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is proud to present a two-part webinar series focused on promoting equity in tribal early childhood programs and celebrating the resilience and creativity of tribal communities a...

On November 12 at 2:00 ET, members of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA) – the grant recipient of the ANA-f...
11/05/2021
Webinar Registration - Zoom

On November 12 at 2:00 ET, members of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA) – the grant recipient of the ANA-funded Unangam Tunuu Achigaasalix – Teaching our Aleut Language project – will be sharing the project’s efforts in maintaining progress during the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure that the Unangax people in Anchorage, Alaska and 13 remote communities are engaged in learning Unangax tunuu, the Unanga language. Join the Keeping Native Language Alive During a Pandemic webinar by registering through this link below:

11/04/2021
Meeting Registration - Zoom

In celebration of November’s Native American Heritage Month, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is proud to present a two-part webinar series focused on promoting equity in tribal early childhood programs and celebrating the resilience and creativity of tribal communities as they serve young American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and families. Register at the link below for Part 2 of the Series on November 16, 2021, 3:30-5:00 pm ET

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About ANA

In January 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared the War on Poverty, a collection of ideals that ultimately laid the foundation for ANA. President Johnson made a call to action, asking communities to prepare “long-range plans for the attack on poverty.” Eight months later, the Economic Opportunity Act was signed into law, and shortly thereafter the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) began awarding grants.

Early in the 1970s, the Office of Economic Opportunity was terminated, but many of its War on Poverty concepts became the basis for ANA. Established in 1974 through the Native American Programs Act (NAPA), this new agency also embraced the goal of Native American self-determination, first endorsed by President Johnson in 1968 and later by President Richard Nixon. ANA serves all Native American populations, including federally recognized tribes, American Indian and Alaska Native organizations, Native Hawaiian organizations and Native populations throughout the Pacific Basin (including American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands).


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According to the National Institute of Justice, approximately 83% of American Indian/Alaska Native adults have experienced some form of violence in their lifetime, such as physical violence by an intimate partner, s*xual violence, stalking, or psychological aggression. To help mitigate the disproportionate level of violence experienced by Native Americans in the U.S., the Administration for Native Americans - ANA has partnered with the Indian Health Service and CDC to develop a Domestic Violence Awareness PSA campaign. Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xtKdx
In partnership with the Indian Health Service and CDC, the Administration for Native Americans - ANA developed a Domestic Violence Awareness Public Service Announcement campaign to help mitigate the disproportionate level of violence experienced by Native Americans in the United States. To address this crisis, several PSAs were created, tailored specifically for Native communities to provide survivors access to resources, improving bystanders’ ability to safely intervene, and increasing prevention efforts on both the individual and community level. Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xtKps.
Yurok Language Program Launches Amazing New Project - Yurok Language Lessons Will Soon be More Accessible Than Ever Before The Administration for Native Americans - ANA recently funded the next evolution of the Yurok Language Program’s comprehensive effort to fully restore the everyday use of the Tribe’s first form of communication. Over the next three years, the Program will use the ANA award to make learning the Yurok language more accessible than ever before. The primary goal of the Planting Seeds: Reclaiming Yurok Language Domains and Building New Circles project is to reintegrate the language within households, workplaces and community events. To accomplish this objective, the Program is creating a series of digital platforms containing interactive educational tools, implementing culturally relevant learning exercises and developing a virtual archive featuring a diversity of resources. The Program is also establishing a community-wide team of language liaisons, comprised of tribal staff and local residents, who will help promote and participate in learning opportunities. “When we designed this project, we focused on how we could best serve the community, while supporting the development of new and existing language speakers. We wanted to ensure that language is spoken in the home, that language is spoken in the workplace, and that we hear and speak the language at our ceremonies and gatherings,” said Yurok Language Program Manager Victoria Carlson. “We also thought about the elders who dedicated their lives and energy into preserving the language. The Yurok language team feels we are on a path they would want us to pursue.” “The Yurok Language Program has developed an outstanding teacher training program. The language is now taught in head starts and public schools. We have built an amazing foundation to take the next step, which is to move the language out of the classroom and into the community. We want to empower people to use the language in their day-to-day lives,” said Distance Learning Coordinator Brittany Vigil. “We’re really focusing our efforts on bringing the language back to where it belongs, which is everywhere,” added Yurok Language Cultural Coordinator James Gensaw. “One of the things they did when they tried to exterminate us was remove language from the home. One of the primary goals of this project is bring the use of the language back into the homes of all of our members.” The Planting Seeds: Reclaiming Yurok Language Domains and Building New Circles project reflects the input of more than 130 Yurok citizens, who provided feedback on the Program’s future goals. The three domains, which include Reintroduction to Ceremony, Yurok Tribal Employees, and Distance Learning and Community Engagement, were each selected for a specific purpose. “The domains touch on the aspects of our daily lives as Yurok people. We want to normalize the use of the language in everyday situations,” said Distance Learning Coordinator Brittany Vigil, who is leading the development of the digital assets. The first online platform is a new website, yuroklanguage.com Currently under construction, the site will contain language curricula, digital animations with Yurok songs and much more. The Language Program is also building a series of applications offering on-demand learning materials, including videos and audio recordings of tribal elders telling traditional stories. “I want people to see the Yurok language every day of their lives. They’re going to see it in their email, or at a community class or on social media. We want to normalize the everyday use of the language,” said Distance Learning Coordinator Vigil. “Once the distance learning courses, digital platforms and the online archive are in place, they will be available to the community. For as long as there is a Yurok Tribe, all of these learning tools will be organized in one place for future learners,” added Barbara McQuillen, the Yurok Language Collections and Teacher Training Coordinator. The Program has already organized the first of many immersive activities, including acorn-gathering and eel hook-making events where participants learned terminology related to the activity. Plans are in the works to put on similar events in the near term. The language will also be incorporated into the Tribe’s most high-profile gatherings, such as the Salmon Festival and Spring Flings. “There are numerous studies that show hands-on learning stimulates language acquisition. Immersion is actually the best way to learn. It triggers a ton of language growth,” said Yurok Language Cultural Coordinator James Gensaw. “The online and in-person language activities cater to every learning style.” There are benefits that go well beyond language acquisition and retention too. For example, second language learners regularly perform better in reading, math and language arts. Indigenous communities who have higher levels of language retention are shown to have lower rates of cigarette smoking, substance abuse, su***de, domestic violence, and diabetes. Native Children who learn their language have higher levels of self-esteem, higher levels of confidence in their own abilities, and decreased levels of anxiety. “New research indicates that those who learn their native language are less likely to attempt su***de too,” said Language Collections and Teacher Training Coordinator Barbara McQuillen. The Program is currently looking for 15 language liaisons from the tribal government and the community. In addition to supporting the Program, the liaisons will receive assistance with achieving an intermediate-low level of proficiency in speaking the language. The Program encourages all interested community members to sign up to become a liaison. If you’re interested, please email Yurok Language Distance Learning Coordinator Brittany Vigil-Burbank at [email protected]. The Planting Seeds Project represents a natural progression of the successful Yurok elder-led campaign implemented between the 1950s and early 2000s to preserve the language. At every juncture, the Yurok Language Program team acknowledges their predecessors’ dedication to saving the language. Taking the mantle, the Program has made the language available in the Tribe’s Head Starts in addition to public high schools on the Yurok and Hoopa Reservations and in Del Norte and Humboldt Counties. The language will continue to be offered in these educational institutions for the foreseeable future. During the past five years, the Program has trained a team of talented teacher candidates and continues to develop new instructors. In fact, some the teachers from the initial class are now training new language educators. The Program also provides community language classes. Prior to the pandemic, the courses were taught in-person, but now they are available via Zoom. “We believe this project is a reflection of what our fluent elder speakers would have wanted us to carry on to ensure the survival of our language. I feel confident our language team will be able to accomplish the goals of this project,” concluded Yurok Language Program Manager Carlson. Source: (Joana Jansen, Northwest Indian Language Institute, University of Oregon; Lindsay Marean, Owens Valley Career Development Center; and Janne Underriner, Northwest Indian Language Institute, University of Oregon) To stay informed about learning opportunities, visit the Yurok Language Program’s page, which can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/yuroktribelanguage
Native Language Summit - Free! Administration for Native Americans - ANA https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2021-national-native-american-language-summit-virtual-tickets-171225910307
Project Planning Season is here! Turn your vision for a community based project into a reality with funding opportunities from the Administration for Native Americans - ANA. Learn the fundamentals of how with us! The video below is an introduction to our Project Planning and Development Training, which is coming soon! Stay tuned for more information. #funding #GetFunded #ANA #grants #community #project #nativeamerican https://youtu.be/yx92xPKxdKk
Thank you Ka Paʻalana Staff for the love, support and dedication you all have for the keiki of this ʻĀina. My husband and I are taken back by all the effort you put in to make it possible for families like us that can't afford learning material (laptop), supplies (Kōkua kits) and food (food boxes) for our keiki. Because of all your effort, our son has the chance to learn from home and get a head start in his childhood education. There's no words that could honestly say how blessed and thankful we are to have you all a part of our life but most importantly a part of our son’s life and education. Thanks from the bottom of our hearts. — Ka Paʻalana Family Education Program parent share Since the onset of the #covid19 pandemic, #PIDFoundation raced to close the digital divide, the gap between those who have access to digital resources and those who do not. That’s why #KaPaʻalana distributed 126 Lenovo Chromebooks and computer accessories to their Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi Island site participants in an effort to reach #DigitalEquity in Hawaiʻi. This #ThankfulThursday, we mahalo supporters like Administration for Native Americans - ANA and Hawai'i Public Schools that help us meet the needs of our participants— mahalo nui loa! To learn more, get involved, or support #PIDF, visit our pidf.org and or contact us today.