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In 1975, @NASA_Marshall hired Barbara Askins as a chemist. In 1978, she patented a chemical method that enhanced photogr...
03/11/2022

In 1975, @NASA_Marshall hired Barbara Askins as a chemist. In 1978, she patented a chemical method that enhanced photographic images. Originally intended to improve the quality of astronomy photos, the process also led to improvements in X-ray technology.

#WomensHistoryMonth

It's #TriviaThursday!Which Apollo mission was the first to use the lunar roving vehicle on the Moon?If you know the answ...
03/10/2022

It's #TriviaThursday!

Which Apollo mission was the first to use the lunar roving vehicle on the Moon?

If you know the answer, comment below! 👇

Give up or want to learn more? Check out our free e-Book, "Where No Man Has Gone Before!"
https://history.nasa.gov/SP-4214.pdf

#NASAHistoryPublications 📖

#OTD in 1965, Pilot Milt Thompson claimed that he could water ski across the flooded Rogers Dry Lake. Emil "Jack" Klueve...
03/10/2022

#OTD in 1965, Pilot Milt Thompson claimed that he could water ski across the flooded Rogers Dry Lake. Emil "Jack" Kluever volunteered to pull Thompson along using a tow rope and a helicopter, but their scheme was thwarted by Joe Vensel, the then director of flight operations.

✨Feeling rejuvenated!✨#OTD in 2002, the Space Shuttle Columbia redeployed @NASAHubble after the crew of STS-109 performe...
03/09/2022

✨Feeling rejuvenated!✨

#OTD in 2002, the Space Shuttle Columbia redeployed @NASAHubble after the crew of STS-109 performed a series of five spacewalks to service the telescope. They installed new and improved equipment including a new camera and an experimental cooling system.

Happy #InternationalWomensDay! We are inspired by the women throughout our history who have contributed to NASA as scien...
03/08/2022

Happy #InternationalWomensDay!

We are inspired by the women throughout our history who have contributed to NASA as scientists, astronauts, engineers, technicians, mathematicians, historians, administrators, and more.

Are you interested in learning about more amazing women throughout NASA's history? Check out these resources!

"Women at work in NASA" compiled by Harriet Jenkins in the 1980s:https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/19810017324/downloads/19810017324.pdf

@NASA_Johnson's "Herstory" Project: https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/oral_histories/herstory.htm

More resources: https://history.nasa.gov/women_at_nasa.html

Ah! A spider!#OTD in 1969, the crew of Apollo 9 achieved the separation and rendezvous of the lunar module (known as "Sp...
03/07/2022

Ah! A spider!

#OTD in 1969, the crew of Apollo 9 achieved the separation and rendezvous of the lunar module (known as "Spider") and the command module (known as "Gumdrop"). Performed in Earth orbit, this maneuver was a key objective of the mission.

Read more: https://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/SP-4205/ch12-5.html

"I knew that we were going to go to the Moon when I was 10 years old. That was in 1937."Dorothy "Dottie" Lee was hired a...
03/03/2022

"I knew that we were going to go to the Moon when I was 10 years old. That was in 1937."

Dorothy "Dottie" Lee was hired as a mathematician in 1948 at what is now @NASA_Langley, but later made the transition into aerothermodynamics engineering and moved to @NASA_Johnson.

One of her projects was to predict the performance of the Apollo Command Module heat shield, an essential element to the success of the spacecraft.

After nearly 40 years at NACA/NASA, Dottie retired in 1987.

Oral History: https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/oral_histories/LeeDB/LeeDB_11-10-99.htm

#WomensHistoryMonth

Pioneer 10 was launched #OTD in 1972!As an emissary for Earth, Pioneer carries a small, gold plaque that shows what huma...
03/03/2022

Pioneer 10 was launched #OTD in 1972!

As an emissary for Earth, Pioneer carries a small, gold plaque that shows what humans look like, where we are located in the galaxy, and the date the mission began.

Pioneer 10 sent its last signal to Earth in 2003.

https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/resources/706/pioneer-plaque/

Dorothy Vaughan was the head "West Area Computing" unit, an all-black group of woman mathematicians. During her years as...
03/02/2022

Dorothy Vaughan was the head "West Area Computing" unit, an all-black group of woman mathematicians. During her years as supervisor at what is now NASA Langley Research Center, she advocated for the women she led, working to ensure that they received the recognition they deserved.

After the office was disbanded, Vaughan became an expert FORTRAN programmer. She retired in 1971, after 28 years.

Her career of advocacy and leadership paved the way for others to follow in her footsteps.

https://www.nasa.gov/content/dorothy-vaughan-biography

#WomensHistoryMonth

Charles Smoot was hired at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in 1963. Over the course of his NASA career, Smoot establ...
02/28/2022

Charles Smoot was hired at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in 1963. Over the course of his NASA career, Smoot established a cooperative program which recruited Black university students in the fields of engineering, physics, and mathematics.

Learn more: https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/charles-t-smoot.html
#BlackHistoryMonth

#OTD in 1969, NASA announced the 38 scientists selected to develop the Martian lander for the Viking missions. Each Viki...
02/25/2022

#OTD in 1969, NASA announced the 38 scientists selected to develop the Martian lander for the Viking missions. Each Viking spacecraft consisted of an orbiter and lander. The landers carried instruments to study the composition and properties of the martian surface and atmosphere.

"I was able to stand on the shoulders of those women who came before me, and women who came after me were able to stand ...
02/16/2022

"I was able to stand on the shoulders of those women who came before me, and women who came after me were able to stand on mine"

Christine Darden was hired in 1967 as a "human computer." 8 years later, she fought for a transfer to the engineering section. She spent the next 25 years studying sonic boom minimization, becoming one of NASA's preeminent experts on supersonic flight and sonic booms. Her 40-year career at NASA Langley Research Center made a lasting impact for those who followed in her footsteps.

Read one of her lectures:https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20030012931/downloads/20030012931.pdf

"You'll be flying along some nights with a full moon...You look up there and just say to yourself: I've got to get up th...
02/15/2022

"You'll be flying along some nights with a full moon...You look up there and just say to yourself: I've got to get up there."
-Roger Chaffee (New York Times)

Today we remember Roger Chaffee on his birthday. He tragically died in the Apollo 1 fire, prior to his first spaceflight.

Learn more about his life and achievements: https://history.nasa.gov/Apollo204/zorn/chaffee.htm

"and [to the] people who may be feeling there's one fewer 'Love' on Earth this #ValentinesDay...I'd like to assure them ...
02/15/2022

"and [to the] people who may be feeling there's one fewer 'Love' on Earth this #ValentinesDay...I'd like to assure them that it's great to be up here, and I'll be home soon"

STS-122 astronaut Stanley Love cracked jokes & thanked his loved ones for his wakeup call #OTD in 2008.

Home is where the heart is💖#OTD in 1990, the Voyager 1 turned to take one last look at our solar system and the "pale bl...
02/14/2022

Home is where the heart is💖

#OTD in 1990, the Voyager 1 turned to take one last look at our solar system and the "pale blue dot" we call home. The spacecraft captured one of the most famous images of planet Earth, fragile and small in the expanse of space.

https://www.nasa.gov/jpl/voyager/pale-blue-dot-images-turn-25

@NASASolarSystem

In 1967, Maj. Robert Lawrence, Jr. became the 1st African-American to be selected as an astronaut by any national space ...
02/11/2022

In 1967, Maj. Robert Lawrence, Jr. became the 1st African-American to be selected as an astronaut by any national space program when he was assigned to the United States Air Force's Manned Orbiting Laboratory project. However, just months after his selection, he tragically perished in a jet crash.

Learn more about Lawrence and his accomplishments: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/robert-lawrence-first-african-american-astronaut

#BlackHistoryMonth

Physician and pioneer Dr. Irene Duhart Long left a lasting impact on NASA's Kennedy Space Center. An expert in aerospace...
02/10/2022

Physician and pioneer Dr. Irene Duhart Long left a lasting impact on NASA's Kennedy Space Center. An expert in aerospace medicine, Dr. Long's career lasted 31 years. In 2000, she was named the Chief Medical Officer, a position she held until her retirement.

#BlackHistoryMonth

#OTD in 1995 astronaut Bernard Harris, payload commander of STS-63, became the first African American to walk in space! ...
02/09/2022

#OTD in 1995 astronaut Bernard Harris, payload commander of STS-63, became the first African American to walk in space! The EVA lasted 4 hours & 38 minutes. Before his selection as an astronaut in 1990, Dr. Harris worked at NASA's Johnson Space Center as a flight surgeon & clinical scientist.

Emmit Fisher was an engineer and specialist in numerical analysis techniques at the Manned Spacecraft Center (@NASAJohns...
02/08/2022

Emmit Fisher was an engineer and specialist in numerical analysis techniques at the Manned Spacecraft Center (@NASAJohnson). A former acoustics specialist with the White Sands Missile Range, he contributed to Project BANSHEE which studied sound waves in Earth's atmosphere.

In 1979, he was featured in the JSC Roundup newsletter for his award-winning, humorous speech, "Encounter with a Rattlesnake" which he presented at the District 56 Toastmasters International Conference.

https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/roundups/issues/79-11-02.pdf

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It's always good to see some new faces! In January 1978, NASA announced that it had selected its 8th group of astronauts, 15 Space Shuttle pilot and 20 mission-specialist candidates. The group, dubbed, the “Thirty-Five New Guys" was the first new group of astronauts since 1969. The 1978 Astronaut Class was notable in many ways and included the first African-American, Asian-American, and women astronauts. You can read about many of their experiences in NASA's Johnson Space Center's oral history collection: https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/oral_histories/participants.htm
What does diplomacy look like in space? Our friends over at National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution will be presenting a live chat on that very topic with our very own Acting Chief Historian, Brian Odom, as a panelist! Tune in today at 1 pm and ask some questions of your own! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pks45uddBO8
The Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-72) launched from @NASAKennedy #OTD in 1996. It was the first shuttle flight of the year. Highlights of the mission included the retrieval of a Japanese satellite, deployment and retrieval of a NASA science payload, and two spacewalks.
This photograph was taken #OTD in 1969, the day after NASA announced the crew assignment for Apollo 11. Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong, and Michael Collins posed in front of the lunar module mockup at the Manned Spaceflight Center (now known as NASA's Johnson Space Center)
Astronomer Galileo Galilei peered at Jupiter through his homemade telescope #OTD in 1610, spotting three other points of light near the planet. He initially believed them to be distant stars, but their movement did not match up with that of stars. After several nights of observation, he observed a fourth "star" and concluded that all four must be moons orbiting around Jupiter. He published his findings in March 1610 in a book titled "Siderius Nuncius" (The Starry Messenger). We still refer to these moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto) as the Galilean satellites in honor of their discoverer. Want to learn more? Check out this awesome article from our NASA's Johnson Space Center History Office: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/410-years-ago-galileo-discovers-jupiter-s-moons [Image: "family portrait" of the four Galilean satellites shown in increasing distance from Jupiter are (left to right) Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.]
Did you know that the tradition of eating steak and eggs as a pre-launch breakfast began during Project Mercury? Pictured below are crew members of Gemini X, MA-6, and Apollo 13 enjoying the hearty fare. If you were about to launch into space, what would you eat for breakfast?
The first artificial satellite successfully placed in orbit around the Earth, the Soviet Sputnik satellite, reentered Earth’s atmosphere after nearly 1400 orbits #OTD in 1958. Read more about this historic satellite: https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/nmc/spacecraft/display.action?id=1957-001B
#OTD in 1962, NASA publicly announced the name of our 2nd human spaceflight program: Gemini. Named after the third constellation of the zodiac, Gemini was a bridge between the Mercury and Apollo programs. Gemini achieved many firsts for the US, including our first spacewalk!
This is one “auld” acquaintance we won’t forget! #OTD in 1801, astronomer Giuseppe Piazzi observed a distant object that we now know as the dwarf planet Ceres. In 2015, NASA’s Dawn mission visited Ceres, returning valuable data on the early solar system. #HappyNewYear!
#OTD in 1980, the Space Shuttle Columbia made the journey from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the Launch Complex 39A at @NASAKennedy. Its first mission, STS-1, would launch in April 1981. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/40-years-ago-space-shuttle-columbia-rolls-out-to-launch-pad-39a
❄️ A snow day! ❄️ #OTD in 2010, the Terra Earth observation satellite captured this image of the east coast of the United States covered in a recent snowfall. What are some of your favorite snow day traditions?
#OTD in 1968, the crew of Apollo 8 returned safely to Earth, splashing down in the Pacific Ocean. This photograph of their reentry was taken by a U.S. Air Force ALOTS (Airborne Lightweight Optical Tracking System) camera mounted on a KC-135A aircraft flown at 40,000 ft altitude. Interested in learning more about the Apollo 8 mission? Check out the Apollo Flight Journal for a collection of transcripts, photographs, and other documents relating to the mission. https://history.nasa.gov/afj/ap08fj/index.html