National Park Service, Museum Management Program

National Park Service, Museum Management Program The National Park Service Museum Management Program develops policies, procedures, web exhibits & curriculum that reflect over 380 park museums nationwide.

What do all these have in common? Abraham Lincoln’s rocking chair. Jurassic dinosaurs. Thomas Edison’s handwritten notes. Frederick Douglass’ library. Prehistoric pottery. George Washington’s inauguration day suit. Civil War uniforms. WWII dog tag from Manzanar Relocation Camp. Everglades tree snails. American Red Cross founder Clara Barton’s first aid kit. Botanical specimens. All are part of the National Park Service museum collections. The NPS is one of the world's largest museum systems. It preserves places of grandeur and national significance, as well as over 45 million natural, art, historic, and prehistoric objects and 64,000 linear feet of archives at over 360 units nationwide. These collections tell powerful stories of this land - its diverse cultures, varied habitats, flora and fauna, significant events, and innovative ideas that continue to inspire the world. Collections range from everyday items associated with iconic American men and women, to objects of breathtaking beauty and overwhelming significance. They inform us about peoples who have left no written records, and provide information about Americans at home, at work, and at war, and they record the rich tapestry of American habitats and ecosystems. They are witness to American history and prehistory. See NPS collections in virtual museum exhibits, Web Catalog and Teaching with Museum Collections lesson plans at www.nps.gov/history/museum General Information We welcome your comments and hope that our conversations here will be courteous. You are fully responsible for the content of your comments. We do not discriminate against any views, but we reserve the right to delete any of the following: • off-topic comments • violent, vulgar, obscene, profane, hateful, or racist comments • comments that threaten or defame any person or organization • The violation of the privacy of another individual • solicitations, advertisements, or endorsements of any financial, commercial, or non-governmental agency • comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity • comments promoting or opposing any person who is campaigning for election to a political office or promoting or opposing any ballot proposition • comments including phone numbers, e-mail addresses, residential addresses, or similar information • multiple, successive off-topic posts by a single user • repetitive posts copied and pasted by multiple users Communication made through this service’s e-mail and/or messaging system will in no way constitute a legal or official notice or comment to the U.S. Department of the Interior (or bureau) or any official or employee of the U.S. Department of the Interior (or bureau) for any purpose. References to projects, properties, commercial entities, products, services, or nongovernmental organizations or individuals are provided solely for information. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of U.S. Department of the Interior (or bureau), the United States Government, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, property, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement or certification of any property, product, person, or service and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying U.S. Department of the Interior (or bureau) endorsement or approval of any property, product, person, or service. Reporters or other media representatives are asked to send questions through their normal channels (the appropriate DOI/bureau office public affairs or communications office) and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions may be removed. This Comment Policy is subject to amendment or modification at any time to ensure that its continued use is consistent with its intended purpose as a limited forum.

In 1881, Booker T. Washington arrived in Alabama and started building Tuskegee Institute both in reputation and literall...
10/26/2020

In 1881, Booker T. Washington arrived in Alabama and started building Tuskegee Institute both in reputation and literally brick by brick. He recruited the best and the brightest to come and teach at Tuskegee Institute including George Washington Carver who arrived in 1896.

Learn more about Booker T. Washington and Tuskegee Institute at https://www.nps.gov/museum/exhibits/tuskegee/btwashington/index.html. #npscollections

This hide scraper represents ideals central to Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, particularly continuity o...
10/15/2020

This hide scraper represents ideals central to Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, particularly continuity of indigenous lifeways and traditional knowledge, including the use of local materials. Collected by Robert Marshall during his time in the village of Wiseman in the early 1930s, it is also connected to the Bob Marshall legacy, especially his appreciation for the native cultures. The handle, ergonomically shaped to better fit the user's hand, is carved from spruce and has been adorned with the owner's marks. The bit was knapped from obsidian from the Batza Tena source, roughly 130 miles away.

Photo information:
Hide Scraper
Early 20th century
Nunamiut Eskimo; may be associated with Mrs. Big Jim Nagukluk
Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, GAAR 2

Learn more about Yosemite’s basket weavers, the materials used to make their baskets, and the distinctions of designs an...
10/06/2020

Learn more about Yosemite’s basket weavers, the materials used to make their baskets, and the distinctions of designs and colors by exploring our newest online museum exhibit at https://go.nps.gov/yosemite_basketry.

Have you ever visited the Yosemite Museum? If so, it’s likely that you’ve enjoyed seeing the beautiful baskets on display from our collection. Big and small, utilitarian in their purpose, or souvenirs for early tourists, baskets encompassed the artistry, creativity, and skill the first women in Yosemite possessed.

Baskets served many purposes in the lives and culture of Yosemite’s first peoples. They were used to carry goods, harvest seeds, sift grain, cook meals, and store belongings. They were used as game mats, bowls, jugs, racquets, pots, cradles, and eventually, as a source of income. Like many other traditions, basket weaving is an art that is still practiced today with techniques passing down from one generation to the next.

Thanks to the support of the Yosemite Conservancy you can enjoy a virtual exhibit which focuses on Yosemite basketry. Learn more about Yosemite’s basket weavers, the materials used to make their baskets, and the distinctions of designs and colors: https://go.nps.gov/yosemite_basketry

President Dwight D. Eisenhower enjoyed several hobbies including oil painting. He completed almost 300 paintings in the ...
10/06/2020

President Dwight D. Eisenhower enjoyed several hobbies including oil painting. He completed almost 300 paintings in the last 20 years of his life and gave nearly all of them away as gifts. This painting is his only known work to depict his Gettysburg home. Soon after completing it, he invited Arthur Kennell, his golf caddy at the Gettysburg Country Club, over for a visit. At the end of their visit, the president gave Mr. Kennell this painting—most appropriate since it includes the president’s personal golf putting green. Mr. Kennell proudly displayed the painting in his home for the rest of his life. After his passing in 2013, his widow donated it to the park. #npscollections #findyourpark

The Gettysburg Farm
Dwight D. Eisenhower
May 1967
Eisenhower National Historic Site

Widely recognized as the most important Latino leader in the United States during the twentieth century, César E. Chávez...
09/30/2020
Virtual Tour of the César E. Chávez National Monument - Indoors - National Park Service - Google Arts & Culture

Widely recognized as the most important Latino leader in the United States during the twentieth century, César E. Chávez led farm workers and supporters in the establishment of the country's first permanent agricultural union. His leadership brought sustained international attention to the plight of U.S. farm workers, and secured for them higher wages and safer working conditions.

Under the leadership of César E. Chávez and others such as Dolores Huerta and Larry Itliong, along with support from millions of Americans, the farm worker movement joined forces with other reform movements to achieve unprecedented successes that greatly improved working and living conditions and wages for farm workers. The enduring legacies of César E. Chávez and the farm worker movement include passage of California's Agricultural Labor Relations Act of 1975, the first law in the U.S. that recognized farm workers' collective bargaining rights.

Explore the indoors of the César Chávez National Monument exhibit hall at https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/8AJiAoiWisUxKA.

*The 1965-1970 Delano Grape Strike and Boycott* On September 8, 1965, Filipino American grape workers, members of the Agricultural Workers Organizing Com...

Lincoln Home National Historic Site
09/29/2020

Lincoln Home National Historic Site

"Is that bed big enough for Mr. Lincoln?" is a frequent question heard when visitors enter Mr. Lincoln's bedroom. Did you see the bed on last Saturday's #athomewiththelincolns video with Ranger Paul? You may have been distracted by the vibrant wallpaper he was talking about, but the answer to that question is yes, the bed is long enough for a person of Mr. Lincoln's stature (6' 4") to sleep quite comfortably. The mattress and box spring (yep, box springs have been around for hundreds of years) are 6'9" long and the bed is 7 feet long. Although the bed wasn't Lincoln's, it fits the description provided by Lincoln's friend Judge Franklin Blades: "On being ushered upstairs (Lincoln would often meet with people in his bedroom like a home office) I found Mr. Lincoln and the Democratic State Auditor...sitting on a high post bed, chatting with each other, Mr. Lincoln particularly greeting all who came into the room." Sounds like a lively gathering! No wonder Mrs. Lincoln wanted the room to look nice if there were going to be so many people in it! #MuseumMonday

On Friday, September 18th, the National Park Service formally welcomed the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial as America's 42...
09/22/2020

On Friday, September 18th, the National Park Service formally welcomed the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial as America's 420th unit of the National Park System. The memorial in Washington, DC, honors Eisenhower’s legacy as the World War II Supreme Allied Commander and nation's 34th president.

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/ddem/index.htm.

Today is the 158th Anniversary of the Battle of Antietam.  Click the image below to take a virtual tour of the battlefie...
09/18/2020
Virtual Tour - Antietam National Battlefield (U.S. National Park Service)

Today is the 158th Anniversary of the Battle of Antietam. Click the image below to take a virtual tour of the battlefield.

1. Dunker Church 2. North Woods 3. East Woods 4. The Cornfield 5. West Woods 6. Mumma Farm and Cemetery 7. Union Advance 8. Sunken Road (Bloody Lane) 9. Lower Bridge (Burnside Bridge) 10. Final Attack 11. Antietam National Cemetery

September 15 to October 15 is celebrated nationwide as National Hispanic Heritage Month. It traditionally honors the cul...
09/15/2020
Hispanic Heritage Month - NPS Celebrates! (U.S. National Park Service)

September 15 to October 15 is celebrated nationwide as National Hispanic Heritage Month. It traditionally honors the cultures and contributions of both Hispanic and Latino Americans as we celebrate heritage rooted in all Latin American countries.

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/hispanic-heritage-month.htm.

September 15 to October 15 is celebrated nationwide as National Hispanic Heritage Month. It traditionally honors the cultures and contributions of both Hispanic and Latino Americans as we celebrate heritage rooted in all Latin American countries. During this month and throughout the year, we, and ou...

Today we honor all of those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001 and all who made the ultimate sacrifice for our c...
09/11/2020

Today we honor all of those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001 and all who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country in the years that followed. May we never forget.
#September11 #NationalDayOfService

A Field of Honor Forever

On September 11, 2001, the country was shaken when terrorists coordinated the hijacking of four commercial airliners in a strategically planned attack against the United States. Despite the destruction and devastation, stories of courage and heroism emerged. When confronted with the urgency of their situation, the passengers and crew of Flight 93 chose to act heroically and made the ultimate sacrifice over Pennsylvania. These 40 heroes decided to fight back against terrorism, defending our freedom and preventing even further loss of life. Today, President Trump, Secretary Bernhardt and other dignitaries will join the families of Flight 93 at the National Memorial to honor and pay homage to the passengers and crew. The Moment of Remembrance program will begin at 9:45 am and will be live streamed with coverage beginning at 9:15 am.

To view the Live Stream, please visit Flight 93 National Memorial’s website at http://www.nps.gov/flni.

Image: A solid beam of light illuminates the skies over the Tower of Voices at Flight 93 National Memorial. NPS/B. Torrey

#Honor93 #September11

On this day, September 9,1957, the Civil Rights Act of 1957 was signed into legislation by President Eisenhower. The Act...
09/09/2020

On this day, September 9,1957, the Civil Rights Act of 1957 was signed into legislation by President Eisenhower. The Act marked the first occasion since Reconstruction that the federal government undertook significant legislative action to protect civil rights. #OTD

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/civilrights/modern-civil-rights-movement.htm.

Photo Credit:
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, Washington, D.C.
November 11, 2011
Carol M. Highsmith
[Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2013650720/.

One of Lowell’s early leading labor reformers was a mill girl named Sarah Bagley. Born on a New Hampshire farm in 1806, ...
09/07/2020

One of Lowell’s early leading labor reformers was a mill girl named Sarah Bagley. Born on a New Hampshire farm in 1806, Bagley arrived in Lowell in 1836 and worked in a number of mills. She became a powerful speaker on behalf of male and female workers, promoted the 10-hour workday, and edited the labor newspaper The Voice of Industry. Although the struggles of Bagley and other mill girls to achieve legislation for a 10-hour day failed, Lowell’s textile corporations did reduce the workday to 11 hours.

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/lowe/learn/historyculture/sarah-bagley.htm.

Pearl Harbor National Memorial
09/02/2020

Pearl Harbor National Memorial

Watch the Official Ceremony of the 75th WWII Commemoration live!

With opening features including historic Legacy of Peace footage as well as live WWII Warbird flyovers, countless ships in Pearl Harbor and a Naval Pass & Review in honor of our WWI veterans, the historic official ceremony taking place on the Fantail of the Battleship Missouri Memorial will begin at 9:02am. It will feature music by the U.S. Pacific Fleet & the U.S. Marines Corps Forces, Pacific Bands; the Parade of Colors; speeches by stakeholders connected to the event, including CAPT Steve Colon, USN (RET), Governor David Ige, State of Hawaii; a video message from General Mark Milley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; guest speaker Admiral Phillip Davidson, Commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command; and keynote speaker, Dr. Mark Esper, U.S. Secretary of Defense; and more! We will honor all those who served both in battle and the home front and pay tribute to our Greatest Generation.
Salute their Service. Honor their Hope.

Ways to join — virtually:

Check with your local networks. Many stations will be airing it in Hawaii, across the U.S., and globally.

On our website at 75thwwiicommemoration.org/live

Facebook-live at 75thwwii

For more information go to 75thwwiicommemoration.org

This child’s costume was worn for “Courir de Mardi Gras.” The tradition of the Cajun Courir de Mardi Gras was brought wi...
09/01/2020

This child’s costume was worn for “Courir de Mardi Gras.” The tradition of the Cajun Courir de Mardi Gras was brought with Cajuns from rural France to Canada to Louisiana. The participants go from house to house begging for ingredients for a communal gumbo. Many of the original costumes are derivatives of the costumes worn in early rural France for the same celebration. The costumes not only conceal the identities of the participants, but also allow them to parody authority figures and society.

Originally the costumes were made from old work clothes decorated with cloth remnants and pieces of feed sack material. This led to a patchwork style that has become associated with the costuming of the event. Whether it’s Courir de Mardi Gras or New Orleans Mardi Gras, the celebration is about traditions and community. In all of the six sites of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, the park participates with the community to preserve this rich cultural heritage. #NPScollections

The National Park Service preserves the home, gardens, and studios of Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1848–1907), one of America...
08/31/2020
NPSmuseum (@NPSmuseum)

The National Park Service preserves the home, gardens, and studios of Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1848–1907), one of America's greatest sculptors. Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park was authorized by Congress on August 31, 1964. #OTD

More than a century ago, sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and his assistants used a few dabs of plaster to seal shut roughly two dozen sculpture molds. The molds were then put into storage for safekeeping. Since then, the molds have passed from the Saint-Gaudens family to the non-profit Saint-Gaudens Memorial to the National Park Service, and also survived a catastrophic studio fire in 1944.

In 2017, the National Park Service at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site and the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s medical center in Lebanon, New Hampshire developed a partnership to non-invasively peek at what these molds contain. With computed tomography (CT) scanning, radiologists were able to scan the open interior spaces of these molds and then extrapolate the negative space into a positive digital image of what these molds would have been used to cast.

The molds were revealed to be from sculptural commissions that Saint-Gaudens and his assistants were working to complete close to the end of the sculptors life. The CT scans revealed that the molds included pieces from the following Saint-Gaudens works: Abraham Lincoln: The Head of State (original cast in Chicago, Illinois), the Phillips Brooks Monument (original cast in Boston, Massachusetts), the Sherman Monument, (original cast in New York City, New York), and a bust of politician William C. Whitney. #MuseumMonday

View a selection of the 3D models created from this project at: https://sketchfab.com/NPSmuseum.

View the profile and 3D models by NPSmuseum (@NPSmuseum). National Park Service Museum Program

On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the legislation establishing the National Park Service. At the same ...
08/25/2020

On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the legislation establishing the National Park Service. At the same time, women across the country were fighting to guarantee their right to vote throughout the United States, a right that would finally be recognized when the 19th Amendment became part of the US Constitution on August 26, 1920, the day after the fourth birthday of the National Park Service.

Now, as we celebrate the 104th birthday of the National Park Service, we are also recognizing the centennial of the amendment that strengthened the public position of women in American civic life, empowering them to be stronger advocates for the places that became part of the National Park System over the next 100 years.

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/looking-beyond-the-19th-amendment.htm.

Photo credit:
Suffragists demonstrating against Woodrow Wilson in Chicago, 1916.
Library of Congress, Records of the National Woman's Party
https://www.loc.gov/resource/mnwp.276016

Yosemite National Park
08/20/2020

Yosemite National Park

Capable, independent, courageous, comfortable, at home: the legacy and contributions of women are intertwined in Yosemite’s history.

We are celebrating the stories of women in Yosemite a little more this month for the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. This digital exhibit is in honor of the trailblazers of our past, and to those still working tirelessly for equality and inclusion today, that did not let gender norms stifle their passions.

This exhibit, Yosemite Women, can be found at https://npgallery.nps.gov/yose/exhibits#Yosemite%20Women and was made possible by the generous funding and support from Yosemite Conservancy.

This stone projectile point was used by prehistoric hunters living within the modern boundary of Coronado National Memor...
08/18/2020

This stone projectile point was used by prehistoric hunters living within the modern boundary of Coronado National Memorial. This projectile point style was first found by archeologists in Gypsum Cave, Nevada, but is common throughout the desert Southwest. Gypsum points represent what archeologists call the Middle Archaic (5500-3500 BP), a time before ceramic technology and domestic agriculture. Recent archeological studies have discovered evidence suggesting that areas within the memorial were very popular hunting and food gathering locations for generations of Middle Archaic people. #npscollections

Gypsum Projectile Point
4500–3500 BP
Prehistoric American Indian
Coronado National Memorial, CORO 1706
Flaked stone. L 6.0, W 2.7 cm

Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site
08/12/2020

Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site

In the summer of 1912, Maggie L. Walker delivered a speech to the Young People's Christian and Educational Conference in Hampton, Virginia. One of the things that made that speech notable is that, as far as we know, it contained her earliest known statement in support of woman's suffrage, linking it with opportunities for women in the world of business.

After referring to times in which women were forced to enter occupations traditionally filled by men, Walker notes that they were paid less for doing an equal, if not better, job. "Of course the women rebelled," Walker said, "and are rebelling and rebellious even at this present moment, yet Capital is deaf - and will never hear their cries until the women force Capital to hear them at the ballot box, and to do just and honest to them as to the men."

#19thAmendment #VotingRightsForWomen #Centennial #1920to2020 #SuffrageMovement

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