Sargasso Sea Commission

Sargasso Sea Commission The Sargasso Sea is named for the Sargassum seaweed that creates its unique ecosystem. The Sea has been called a golden floating rainforest. It is a haven of biodiversity and there is growing recognition of the crucial role it plays in the wider North Atlantic ecosystem as habitat, foraging and spawning grounds and as a migratory corridor.

Endangered European and American eels migrate to the Sargasso to breed. Wahoo, tuna and other pelagic fish forage in and migrate through the Sea, as do a number of whale species, notably s***m whales and humpbacks. The Sargasso Sea supports a range of endemic species and plays a critical role in supporting the life cycle of a number of threatened and endangered species such as the Porbeagle shark,

Endangered European and American eels migrate to the Sargasso to breed. Wahoo, tuna and other pelagic fish forage in and migrate through the Sea, as do a number of whale species, notably s***m whales and humpbacks. The Sargasso Sea supports a range of endemic species and plays a critical role in supporting the life cycle of a number of threatened and endangered species such as the Porbeagle shark,

Operating as usual

This UN Science Day for Peace and Development the Sargasso Sea Commission is highlighting the important role our oceans ...
11/11/2021

This UN Science Day for Peace and Development the Sargasso Sea Commission is highlighting the important role our oceans play in combating climate change.

Our oceans account for 95% of the total space available for life, and contain 250,000 known species. They are huge repositories of carbon - in the form of large marine animals, tiny but innumerable marine algae, and the sediments that accumulate at the bottom of the ocean.

In the last 200 years, the oceans have absorbed a third of the CO2 produced by human activities and 90% of the extra heat trapped by the rising concentration of greenhouse gases - the oceans have acted as a buffer, shielding us from much more stark effects of climate change.

The Sargasso Sea embodies the positive effects a thriving ocean ecosystem can have on climate change - high seas ecosystems are the site where carbon can transfer from surface waters to be sequestered in the deep ocean - in the form of vertically migrational animals that feed at the surface and deposit wastes in the deep sea, in the form of dead animals sinking to the deep sea, or in the form of sinking sargassum that settles on the sea floor.

Healthy oceans fuel a healthy carbon pump, which can take up, store, and reuse carbon. Ocean action is climate action - and caring for our oceans is an essential part of transitioning to a more sustainable future for our planet.

#un #unscienceday #PeaceAndDevelopment #cetaceans #highseas #oceangovernance #oceanconservation #oceanaction #climatechange #climateaction #sargassum #deepsea #algae #carbonpump #carbonsequestration

Image courtesy of NOAA via Unsplash

This UN Science Day for Peace and Development the Sargasso Sea Commission is highlighting the important role our oceans play in combating climate change.

Our oceans account for 95% of the total space available for life, and contain 250,000 known species. They are huge repositories of carbon - in the form of large marine animals, tiny but innumerable marine algae, and the sediments that accumulate at the bottom of the ocean.

In the last 200 years, the oceans have absorbed a third of the CO2 produced by human activities and 90% of the extra heat trapped by the rising concentration of greenhouse gases - the oceans have acted as a buffer, shielding us from much more stark effects of climate change.

The Sargasso Sea embodies the positive effects a thriving ocean ecosystem can have on climate change - high seas ecosystems are the site where carbon can transfer from surface waters to be sequestered in the deep ocean - in the form of vertically migrational animals that feed at the surface and deposit wastes in the deep sea, in the form of dead animals sinking to the deep sea, or in the form of sinking sargassum that settles on the sea floor.

Healthy oceans fuel a healthy carbon pump, which can take up, store, and reuse carbon. Ocean action is climate action - and caring for our oceans is an essential part of transitioning to a more sustainable future for our planet.

#un #unscienceday #PeaceAndDevelopment #cetaceans #highseas #oceangovernance #oceanconservation #oceanaction #climatechange #climateaction #sargassum #deepsea #algae #carbonpump #carbonsequestration

Image courtesy of NOAA via Unsplash

COP26 began this week, running from October 31st to November 12th. The main goal of the COP is to reassess states' Paris...
11/04/2021

COP26 began this week, running from October 31st to November 12th. The main goal of the COP is to reassess states' Paris Agreement emissions reduction commitments, in order to keep the global temperature increase caused by anthropogenic climate change well under 2 degrees celsius - hopefully limiting it to 1.5 degrees celsius.

This COP is particularly urgent - as global leaders must take drastic action to keep the 1.5 degrees maximum warming target within reach. One of the conference's goals is to secure global net-zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century. To reach this goal, states must phase out coal, invest in renewable energy, curtail deforestation and encourage the switch to electric vehicles.

This will require a large amount of finance - and developed countries must fulfil their commitment to raising $100 billion in climate finance per year.

It is clear that ocean action is climate change action - our oceans play an integral role in regulating the earth's climate, and are estimated to take up 2 billion tons of CO2 per year. Protecting high seas and coastal areas will therefore be of central importance in mitigating the effects of climate change.

We must #listentotheocean and integrate it into our climate change solutions.

Image credit: Unsplash

#cop26 #unfccc #COP26Glasgow #climatechange #climateaction #marinebiodiversity #atlanticocean #OceanAction #netzero #parisagreement

COP26 began this week, running from October 31st to November 12th. The main goal of the COP is to reassess states' Paris Agreement emissions reduction commitments, in order to keep the global temperature increase caused by anthropogenic climate change well under 2 degrees celsius - hopefully limiting it to 1.5 degrees celsius.

This COP is particularly urgent - as global leaders must take drastic action to keep the 1.5 degrees maximum warming target within reach. One of the conference's goals is to secure global net-zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century. To reach this goal, states must phase out coal, invest in renewable energy, curtail deforestation and encourage the switch to electric vehicles.

This will require a large amount of finance - and developed countries must fulfil their commitment to raising $100 billion in climate finance per year.

It is clear that ocean action is climate change action - our oceans play an integral role in regulating the earth's climate, and are estimated to take up 2 billion tons of CO2 per year. Protecting high seas and coastal areas will therefore be of central importance in mitigating the effects of climate change.

We must #listentotheocean and integrate it into our climate change solutions.

Image credit: Unsplash

#cop26 #unfccc #COP26Glasgow #climatechange #climateaction #marinebiodiversity #atlanticocean #OceanAction #netzero #parisagreement

The Sargasso Sea Commission was invited to participate in the launch event for a new report by the CBD - Special Places ...
11/01/2021

The Sargasso Sea Commission was invited to participate in the launch event for a new report by the CBD - Special Places in the Ocean: A Decade of Identifying Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs). During the launch event, several speakers on specific EBSA locations were featured, including a presentation by the Sargasso Sea Commission Executive Secretary, Dr David Freestone.

The Sargasso Sea was described as an EBSA in 2012, and this description helped the Commission achieve its first legally-binding measure to date: the closure of all seamounts in the NAFO area to bottom trawling through 2020, which has recently been extended to through 2025.

The CBD held the first regional EBSA workshop in 2011, and has since described over 300 EBSAs. The description of an EBSA is a scientific and technical process, designed to identify areas of the ocean that are most important to the healthy functioning of the global marine ecosystem. EBSA description does not carry any formal protections, but rather they are intended as a tool to help policy-makers identify which areas should be protected, and act to evidence their value. The EBSA concept was important in progressing toward achieving the Aichi Targets, and will be an important part of the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework.

You can read the full report here -https://www.cbd.int/marine/ebsa/booklet-ebsa-impact-en.pdf

Image: Philippe Rouja freediving under sargassum - David Doubilet

#sargassosea #atlanticocean #ebsa #cbd #marinelife #marineconservation #marinebiodiversity

The Sargasso Sea Commission was invited to participate in the launch event for a new report by the CBD - Special Places in the Ocean: A Decade of Identifying Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs). During the launch event, several speakers on specific EBSA locations were featured, including a presentation by the Sargasso Sea Commission Executive Secretary, Dr David Freestone.

The Sargasso Sea was described as an EBSA in 2012, and this description helped the Commission achieve its first legally-binding measure to date: the closure of all seamounts in the NAFO area to bottom trawling through 2020, which has recently been extended to through 2025.

The CBD held the first regional EBSA workshop in 2011, and has since described over 300 EBSAs. The description of an EBSA is a scientific and technical process, designed to identify areas of the ocean that are most important to the healthy functioning of the global marine ecosystem. EBSA description does not carry any formal protections, but rather they are intended as a tool to help policy-makers identify which areas should be protected, and act to evidence their value. The EBSA concept was important in progressing toward achieving the Aichi Targets, and will be an important part of the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework.

You can read the full report here -https://www.cbd.int/marine/ebsa/booklet-ebsa-impact-en.pdf

Image: Philippe Rouja freediving under sargassum - David Doubilet

#sargassosea #atlanticocean #ebsa #cbd #marinelife #marineconservation #marinebiodiversity

OSPAR has approved a new marine protected area in the North Atlantic, the North Atlantic Current and Evlanov Sea basin (...
10/29/2021

OSPAR has approved a new marine protected area in the North Atlantic, the North Atlantic Current and Evlanov Sea basin (NACES) MPA - representing the 11th MPA OSPAR has established on the high seas.

The 600,000 km2 ocean area was found to be a vitally important foraging habitat for seabirds breeding on the coasts of the North Atlantic, and those migrating across the region. The MPA was designated on October 1st, and will come into force 200 days after that date; on the 19th of April, 2022.

The management measures for the region aim to protect seabird populations, as well as to maintain the richness and resilience of the ecosystems upon which they rely. The MPA seeks to minimise or mitigate human activities that pose a threat to seabirds or the surrounding environment, including fisheries, disturbance from vessel traffic, and pollution.

Though the OSPAR area does not cross the Sargasso Sea Project area, it is adjacent to it, and the organisation is an important partner. The Sargasso Sea Commission Secretariat and the OSPAR Secretariat have a Collaboration Agreement, which includes the objective " to protect and manage the marine environment of the North Atlantic, particularly in Areas beyond National Jurisdiction.”

Learn more about the NACES MPA here - https://www.ospar.org/ministerial/deliverables/naces-mpa

#marineprotectedarea #oceangovernance #ospar #seabirds #atlanticocean

OSPAR has approved a new marine protected area in the North Atlantic, the North Atlantic Current and Evlanov Sea basin (NACES) MPA - representing the 11th MPA OSPAR has established on the high seas.

The 600,000 km2 ocean area was found to be a vitally important foraging habitat for seabirds breeding on the coasts of the North Atlantic, and those migrating across the region. The MPA was designated on October 1st, and will come into force 200 days after that date; on the 19th of April, 2022.

The management measures for the region aim to protect seabird populations, as well as to maintain the richness and resilience of the ecosystems upon which they rely. The MPA seeks to minimise or mitigate human activities that pose a threat to seabirds or the surrounding environment, including fisheries, disturbance from vessel traffic, and pollution.

Though the OSPAR area does not cross the Sargasso Sea Project area, it is adjacent to it, and the organisation is an important partner. The Sargasso Sea Commission Secretariat and the OSPAR Secretariat have a Collaboration Agreement, which includes the objective " to protect and manage the marine environment of the North Atlantic, particularly in Areas beyond National Jurisdiction.”

Learn more about the NACES MPA here - https://www.ospar.org/ministerial/deliverables/naces-mpa

#marineprotectedarea #oceangovernance #ospar #seabirds #atlanticocean

Just in time for Halloween, the NOAA Okeanos Explorer is undertaking another ocean exploration expedition - Windows to t...
10/26/2021

Just in time for Halloween, the NOAA Okeanos Explorer is undertaking another ocean exploration expedition - Windows to the Deep 2021: Southeast ROV and Mapping. The ship will be completing several dives from October 26th-November 15th in the southeastern U.S. continental margin. The purpose of the expedition is to explore and map the seafloor and water column. The ROV dives are live-streamed, allowing anyone to view the expedition's activities in real time. Mapping activities will take place at night.

Follow along with the expedition by following the NOAA Okeanos Explorer on social media, and view livestreams here - oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/livestreams

Image credit: NOAA Ocean Exploration - 2021 North Atlantic Stepping Stones: New England and Corner Rise Seamounts

#oceanexplorer #oceanexploration #noaa #oceangovernance #saveourseas #atlanticocean #dragonfish #deepsea

Just in time for Halloween, the NOAA Okeanos Explorer is undertaking another ocean exploration expedition - Windows to the Deep 2021: Southeast ROV and Mapping. The ship will be completing several dives from October 26th-November 15th in the southeastern U.S. continental margin. The purpose of the expedition is to explore and map the seafloor and water column. The ROV dives are live-streamed, allowing anyone to view the expedition's activities in real time. Mapping activities will take place at night.

Follow along with the expedition by following the NOAA Okeanos Explorer on social media, and view livestreams here - oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/livestreams

Image credit: NOAA Ocean Exploration - 2021 North Atlantic Stepping Stones: New England and Corner Rise Seamounts

#oceanexplorer #oceanexploration #noaa #oceangovernance #saveourseas #atlanticocean #dragonfish #deepsea

10/23/2021

The Sargasso Sea Commission yesterday finalised documentation for the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project during a final Validation Workshop. The project document was well received by project partners, and will be sent to the GEF CEO for final sign off after final comments.

This validation workshop is the culmination of many months of work, beginning last year. In December 2020, the Commission, alongside the United Nations Development Programme and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, formally launched the preparations for a $3 million grant from the Global Environment Facility (GEF). This project is the first-ever GEF grant designed to address governance of a high seas ecosystem.

The four-year project aims to assess information gaps in regards to the Sargasso Sea and to facilitate collaboration between partners and stakeholders in its conservation. This will be achieved through an ecosystem diagnostic analysis, and a strategic action plan defining priority actions.

Learn more on our website! http://www.sargassoseacommission.org/our-work/projects/gef

#oceangovernance #environment #globalenvironment #development #conservation #marinebiology #marineecology #saveourseas #ocean

10/22/2021

The Sargasso Sea Commission yesterday finalised documentation for the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project during a final Validation Workshop. The project document was well received by project partners, and will be sent to the GEF CEO for final sign off after final comments.

This validation workshop is the culmination of many months of work, beginning last year. In December 2020, the Commission, alongside the United Nations Development Programme and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, formally launched the preparations for a $3 million grant from the Global Environment Facility (GEF). This project is the first-ever GEF grant designed to address governance of a high seas ecosystem.

The four-year project aims to assess information gaps in regards to the Sargasso Sea and to facilitate collaboration between partners and stakeholders in its conservation. This will be achieved through an ecosystem diagnostic analysis, and a strategic action plan defining priority actions.

Learn more on our website! http://www.sargassoseacommission.org/our-work/projects/gef

#oceangovernance #environment #globalenvironment #development #conservation #marinebiology #marineecology #saveourseas #ocean

The Sargasso Sea Commission yesterday finalised documentation for the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project during a...
10/21/2021

The Sargasso Sea Commission yesterday finalised documentation for the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project during a final Validation Workshop. The project document was well received by project partners, and will be sent to the GEF CEO for final sign off after final comments.

This validation workshop is the culmination of many months of work, beginning last year. In December 2020, the Commission, alongside the United Nations Development Programme and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, formally launched the preparations for a $3 million grant from the Global Environment Facility (GEF). This project is the first-ever GEF grant designed to address governance of a high seas ecosystem.

The four-year project aims to assess information gaps in regards to the Sargasso Sea and to facilitate collaboration between partners and stakeholders in its conservation. This will be achieved through an ecosystem diagnostic analysis, and a strategic action plan defining priority actions.

Learn more on our website! http://www.sargassoseacommission.org/our-work/projects/gef

#oceangovernance #environment #globalenvironment #development #conservation #marinebiology #marineecology #saveourseas #ocean

The Sargasso Sea Commission yesterday finalised documentation for the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project during a final Validation Workshop. The project document was well received by project partners, and will be sent to the GEF CEO for final sign off after final comments.

This validation workshop is the culmination of many months of work, beginning last year. In December 2020, the Commission, alongside the United Nations Development Programme and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, formally launched the preparations for a $3 million grant from the Global Environment Facility (GEF). This project is the first-ever GEF grant designed to address governance of a high seas ecosystem.

The four-year project aims to assess information gaps in regards to the Sargasso Sea and to facilitate collaboration between partners and stakeholders in its conservation. This will be achieved through an ecosystem diagnostic analysis, and a strategic action plan defining priority actions.

Learn more on our website! http://www.sargassoseacommission.org/our-work/projects/gef

#oceangovernance #environment #globalenvironment #development #conservation #marinebiology #marineecology #saveourseas #ocean

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