Medical Service Corps Leader Development

Medical Service Corps Leader Development Create a culture of continuous learning generating adaptive medical leaders capable of leading across the competition/conflict continuum. The opinions expressed on this page are meant to inform, create discussion and fuel intellectual curiosity and do not reflect those of the Medical Service Corps, Army Medical Department, U.S.
(17)

Army or the Department of Defense.

Army Medicine Officers Selected for the "30 Under 30 Army Leader Developers 2020" by the Center for Junior Officers CPT ...
01/20/2021

Army Medicine Officers Selected for the "30 Under 30 Army Leader Developers 2020" by the Center for Junior Officers

CPT Jon Lindefjeld (Medical Corps), CPT Sebastian Coates (Medical Service Corps), 1LT Cole Stewart (Army Nurse Corps), and 1LT Marissa Duvall (Medical Service Corps) were recently honored by their selection to the 30 Under 30 Army Leader Developers - 2020.

This award is designed to recognize top junior officers who have demonstrated excellence in the "Develops Others" realm of leadership. To be selected for this award, officers were nominated and demonstrated taking the initiative to go above and beyond in proactively supporting the development of others' knowledge, capabilities, and readiness to learn.

"I focus on leader development so that I can lower the barriers to success for others and to learn from lived experiences different than my own. For those wanting to focus on leader development, my advice is to remember that no one has better knowledge, simply different knowledge." - CPT Lindefjeld, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

"I focus on leader development because it is necessary for the U.S. Army and other organizations like it. I was the benefactor of phenomenal leader development as I was surrounded by some of the Army's best leaders as a junior officer. Their care and mentorship made me into the leader I am today. Many of the leaders I have had as a junior officer had served in the 75th Ranger Regiment." - CPT Coates, 557th Medical Company (AS)

"Be present and know your people. Developing others is ultimately easy, all it takes is genuine effort and presence. You do not truly get to know the wants, needs, goals, and desires of others through Outlook or a quick greeting of the day. Talk to your people, but also listen to your people...you will more than likely walk away being developed yourself." - 1LT Stewart, 47th Combat Support Hospital

"It's impossible to know everything about everyone and their experiences. However, you can gain insightful information on how to handle situations, from others who have gone through it. No person is too beneath you, no person is too high up; respecting the Chain of Command is always expected, but we're all people too. Don't dismiss a junior enlisted or senior officer because their mindset is at a different place than yours, everyone in the military has their own unique story. Listen and learn from as many as you can." - 1LT Duvall, U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM)

Congratulations to these officers!

To read more about this award and the resources that the Center for Junior Officers provide, check out this link. https://juniorofficer.army.mil/cjo-30-under-30-award/

For a full listing of all officers selected, visit this link. https://media-exp1.licdn.com/dms/document/C4E1FAQGbcutlQCTJqA/feedshare-document-pdf-analyzed/0/1610600517634?e=1611201600&v=beta&t=nLesRJQ8jcC5Gp4I7sdvQkZXFY5rdB1YxpCxBuukfMo

62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE Tripler Army Medical Center 421st Medical Battalion-Multifunctional 30th Medical Brigade U.S. Army Europe and Africa Medical Service Corps Chief 70H Medical Operations Officers Assistant Corps Chief for Reserve Affairs, Medical Service Corps ScottSonja 44th Medical Brigade 1st Medical Brigade 65th Medical Brigade Army Medicine Europe Regional Health Command-Atlantic #ArmyMedicine #leadership #leadershipdevelopment

Don't Do What Others Could Do - Lessons for DelegationTime is a scarce and irreplaceable resource. Deciding how to manag...
01/19/2021

Don't Do What Others Could Do - Lessons for Delegation

Time is a scarce and irreplaceable resource. Deciding how to manage time is directly related to how you manage tasks.

Should you own the task, or can you delegate it? What percent of your day would you regain if delegating appropriately?

The Military Leader reviews a short podcast by Michael Hyatt that addresses these questions and more. Below are the cliff notes.

Imperative #1: Admit that working non-stop is unsustainable.

Imperative #2: Understand your unique calling.

Imperative #3: Select qualified leaders to assist you.

Imperative #4: Give these leaders responsibility and authority.

Imperative #5: Only do those things which others cannot do.

QUESTIONS FOR REFLECTION:
- How much of your time is absorbed by tasks others could/should be completing?
- Why do you believe you have to accomplish certain tasks?
- Is your unwillingness to delegate based on an honest assessment of others, fear, or an elevated view of self?

Read the whole article here: https://themilitaryleader.com/lessons-for-delegation-and-authority/?fbclid=IwAR18BYjxb7dNzLvWk7H2amU7KGvCWhK15HjED4RLRIq6Dbv89nIuAdLE_zk

1st Medical Brigade 30th Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE 65th Medical Brigade 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) Army Medicine U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence 67J Aeromedical Evacuation Officers Army Medical Logistics Command 332nd MED BDE Medical Operational Support Group 176th Medical Brigade

“People fail to get along because they fear each other; they fear each other because they don’t know each other; they do...
01/18/2021

“People fail to get along because they fear each other; they fear each other because they don’t know each other; they don’t know each other because they have not communicated with each other.”

- Martin Luther King Jr

Wise words from a wise man that are just as relevant today as when originally spoken.

#MLK #ArmyMedicine #leadership

Good Leadership is About Communicating "Why"When asked to do something new or hard, their first question is often "why"....
01/17/2021

Good Leadership is About Communicating "Why"

When asked to do something new or hard, their first question is often "why". The reason for this, argues Harvard Business Review, is that starting something new or hard requires motivation and motivation is directly linked to understanding "why". If you want people to take action, explaining "why" is crucial.

Leaders often neglect to explain "why" for two reasons:
1. They assume explaining "what" and "how" is the fastest way to influence their audience (does not imply a speech).
2. They think the answer to "why" is so self-evident it does not require explanation.

The Reasons to Explain "Why"
1. Understanding "why" fuels motivation.
2. Communicating "why" demonstrates empathy.
3. Providing "why" is more persuasive.

Three Strategies to get to the heart of "why"
1. Ask some good "what" questions (i.e. What is at stake if we do or do not do this?)
2. Follow up with "because" (the reason or consequence for why)
3. State alternate perspectives (address skeptics and counter arguments)

Questions for Reflection:
- How have you reacted when told to execute without knowing why? How has this differed from when you understood why?
- Is this a more or less effective way to communicate with millennials?
- Are there times when "why" should not, or does not, need to be explained?
- Is your time so valuable and scarce that you do not have enough to explain the "why"?

Read the whole article here: https://hbr.org/2020/05/good-leadership-is-about-communicating-why?fbclid=IwAR3sWnhAxUAWxkaQTuU8B9Obrx2qF041Hu64r0VLn2L8XPlYxBp5SQ8rDAk

1st Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE Medical Service Corps Chief Army Medicine The Company Leader Regional Health Command-Atlantic Army Medical Logistics Command 67J Aeromedical Evacuation Officers 807th Medical Command (Deployment Support) 8th Medical Brigade #leadership #startwithwhy #ArmyMedicine

LTG(R) McMasters provides lessons for today's small unit leaders.The purpose of this essay from The Strategy Bridge is t...
01/16/2021

LTG(R) McMasters provides lessons for today's small unit leaders.

The purpose of this essay from The Strategy Bridge is to reflect on the experience of Eagle Troop, Second Squadron, Second Armored Cavalry Regiment twenty-five years ago during Operation Desert Storm to identify enduring keys to success in battle.

1. Lead from the front. Leaders must be forward to gain a clear picture and make decisions.

2. Shoot first. If you know where friendly forces are and there is not a danger of civilian casualties, do not hesitate to shoot or conduct reconnaissance by fire.

3. Fight through the fog of battle. Be prepared for confusion and concurrent activity.

4. Follow your instincts and intuition.

5. Use standard unit fire and battle drills. Aim to overwhelm the enemy upon contact and retain the initiative through speed of action.

6. Foster initiative. Every trooper understood how our platoons and the troop conducted fire and maneuver.

7. Use tanks to take the brunt of battle. Tanks drove around the anti-tank mines and Bradleys and other vehicles followed in their tracks.

8. Be prepared for misfires and degraded operations.

9. Coordinate between platoons and ensure mutual support.

10. Take risk to win. Because Eagle Troop pressed the assault, the enemy could not respond effectively.

As Erwin Rommel observed in Infantry Attacks: “The man who lies low and awaits developments usually comes off second best. . . .It is fundamentally wrong to halt—or to wait for more forces to come up and take part in the action.”

*Lead from the front; train your unit to understand their capability; work as a team; understand the operating environment and be flexible to take advantage of changes; take risk*

Read the whole article here: https://thestrategybridge.org/the-bridge/2016/2/26/eagle-troop-at-the-battle-of-73-easting?fbclid=IwAR08vKnZqyIsqUCdNEkCavGkBnW07G50RXVatoBydG0RM8jlqsQ5xo_B-jc

U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command 1st Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE 30th Medical Brigade 65th Medical Brigade Assistant Corps Chief for Reserve Affairs, Medical Service Corps Army Medicine Army Medicine Europe Army Logistics University #ArmyMedicine

I Will Go On: Leadership and Resiliency“You must lead and inspire your Soldiers from a place where they think they canno...
01/15/2021

I Will Go On: Leadership and Resiliency

“You must lead and inspire your Soldiers from a place where they think they cannot go on toward a resolute “I will go on” – in life, our professional missions, and in our own continued growth and development.”
- GEN (Ret) Martin Dempsey at West Point - The U.S. Military Academy

Throughout this article, the author reflects on the importance of leadership and resiliency in an organization. Resiliency is ultimately a skill that can lead to long term success. Some of the many common competencies of resiliency include:
- Self Awareness and Self Regulation
- Realistic Optimism
- Broad Perspective
- Mental Agility and Adaptability
- Meaningful Interpersonal Connections

The author from 3x5 Leadership goes on to further discuss ways to develop resiliency in your people and team. How do you value resiliency in your organization? What are ways you strengthen and build on resiliency?

Read the whole article here: https://3x5leadership.com/2019/12/02/i-will-go-on-leadership-and-resilience/?fbclid=IwAR2wYksTp-sVtLcIdcsUCvYGazef_4JbS5WJjtDnGBtoBu1t8fjer81ROPk

Regional Health Command-Atlantic Regional Health Command - Central Assistant Corps Chief for Reserve Affairs, Medical Service Corps 70H Medical Operations Officers Army Medicine Europe 531st Hospital Center 232nd Medical Battalion 1st Medical Brigade #ArmyMedicine #leadership

01/14/2021
1st Medical Brigade

The 1st Medical Brigade change of command between COL Howe and COL Giraud is live now.

Footage from the Change of Command between COL Robert Howe and COL Roger Giraud at Cameron Field, Fort Hood. (Video 2)

Great Leaders are Thoughtful and Deliberate Not Impulsive and ReactiveWhen faced with stress, our natural tendency as pe...
01/14/2021

Great Leaders are Thoughtful and Deliberate Not Impulsive and Reactive

When faced with stress, our natural tendency as people (and leaders) is to be reactive and impulsive. This is often a largely subconscious reaction that defeats our best efforts to remain calm, rational, and deliberate.

Why is this important?
Impulsive and reactive leaders destroy trust, miss crucial feedback, stifle innovation, and fail to develop self and the organization among other challenges.

This article from Harvard Business Review explains how careful self-observation (active reflection) enables us to quell impulsive reactions and take deliberate, thoughtful actions. This process focuses on identifying certain negative emotions such as impatience, frustration and anger, remaining open to feedback, and possessing the courage and humility to grow.

If you think you are never impulsive or reactive, I encourage you to ask your peers or subordinates. If they won't give you that feedback, it may be a result of a pattern of impulsive and reactive leadership behaviors . . .

Read the whole article here: https://hbr.org/2019/04/great-leaders-are-thoughtful-and-deliberate-not-impulsive-and-reactive?fbclid=IwAR142LFfCY0pvfXmNKzVifaiSeT9dZj233wA6gjc4ncD1jiZRlInINDWrAo

1st Medical Brigade 30th Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE 65th Medical Brigade 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) Medical Service Corps Chief Army Leader Exchange 807th Medical Command (Deployment Support) Army Medicine #leadership #ArmyMedicine #HBR

A message from the Joint Chiefs.U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence44th Medical Brigade62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE30th Medic...
01/13/2021

A message from the Joint Chiefs.

U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence
44th Medical Brigade
62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE
30th Medical Brigade
1st Medical Brigade
65th Medical Brigade
Army Medicine
18th Medical Command (Deployment Support)
Army Medicine Europe

Reviewing the Russian Military's Approach to Warfare in UkraineThis Modern War Institute YouTube video describes Russian...
01/12/2021

Reviewing the Russian Military's Approach to Warfare in Ukraine

This Modern War Institute YouTube video describes Russian tactics and capabilities by reviewing their actions in Ukraine. While it is a longer watch than we often share, it is quite informative, even if it is now 3.5 years old. Below are a few key takeaways, but there is much more to unpack.

- Air will be contested.

- Russian forces take a holistic approach to warfare employing conventional and unconventional forces in concert.

- Friendly forces will always be watched, often by multiple capabilities.

- Casualties will occur in much larger numbers with greater frequency.

- Russian sustainment capabilities are still immature.

- Withdrawals and supply routes will at least be contested and likely attacked.

- Lightly armored vehicles are especially susceptible to attack and destruction.

- Areas typically considered at least somewhat secure DSA/CSA/FOB are actively threatened by precision and / or mass fires.

- Only 1 in 3 BNs in a Russian BDE are composed of volunteers. These are their preferred troops.

- Russian advancements in warfare are specifically designed to counter what we typically associate with US superiority/supremacy.

MEDICAL CONSIDERATIONS:

- Is the U.S. Army prepared for MASCALs to occur simultaneously across the fight?

- Where do you position medical forces? Specifically, where do you place Role 3s?

- How well rehearsed are CASEVAC plans? Are vehicles dedicated for this purpose?

- Which echelons of Army Medicine formations are prepared to treat casualties for long periods of time? Is this sufficient?

- Are our ground ambulances prepared to support our maneuver forces in this type of warfare?

- What capabilities should we invest in today to sustain the fighting force?

Watch the whole video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14LMmBsDw-g&feature=emb_logo

U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence 1st Medical Brigade 30th Medical Brigade JMRC 44th Medical Brigade 62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE 65th Medical Brigade Assistant Corps Chief for Reserve Affairs, Medical Service Corps Operations Group, National Training Center JRTC and Fort Polk U.S. Army Combined Arms Center

Division Hospital Company - Filling the GapHow do we retain required uniformed medical force structure while increasing ...
01/11/2021

Division Hospital Company - Filling the Gap

How do we retain required uniformed medical force structure while increasing survivability on the battlefield during large scale combat operations (LSCO)?

One idea is presented by MAJ Clarence Ketterer in this article as we continue to explore the future of Army Medicine. Below are a few key highlights but I encourage you to read the entire article and post your thoughts here.

- The U.S. Army does not have the required Role III capability at the division level to support the universal joint task list ST-2.2 Coordinate Health Service Support.

- While the current alignment of medical organizations works well during Counter Insurgency Operations (COIN), it is not suitable for LSCO.

- Proposed Solution: The Army develops a Division Hospital Company (DHC) that is organic to the division's sustainment brigade.

- The DHC provides Role III care to all Soldiers within the division and can hold patients until an evacuation window is created.

- The U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence submitted a memorandum last year outlining the need for Army medicine to re-engineer itself to best deliver operational medicine.

- The Division Hospital Company is comprised of 100 Soldiers; 31/1/68.

- The DHC would have to be 100% mobile and operate within a much smaller footprint than current Role III Army structures.

- Capabilities: 3 OR beds (1 provided by Vet Team during MASCAL), Role II Veterinary team, 12 bed intensive care ward, 20 bed intermediate care ward, 20 bed minimal care ward, 6 bed trauma/pre-operative ward, laboratory, pharmacy, x-ray, medical supply, medical maintenance, and motor maintenance.

This division hospital company proposal fills a critical shortfall for both the Army in LSCO and Army Medicine transforming in response to the NDAA 2017. By creating the DHC, we will apply Army Medicine to where it matters most; saving lives on the battlefield during large scale combat operations.

The future of warfighting will only grow in complexity. Thinking critically about current and future shortfalls must be a priority for Army Medicine leaders.

Read the whole article hear to full understand the concept: https://medium.com/experientia-et-progressus/division-hospital-company-filling-the-gap-72219c3fa8f6

Many of you have ideas or have at least identified problems that need fixing. Start the dialogue here by sending us your ideas and/or articles.

1st Medical Brigade 30th Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 62ND MEDICAL BRIGADE 65th Medical Brigade 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) Army Medicine Europe U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence Army Logistics University U.S. Army Futures Command #ArmyMedicine #medicine Operational Medicine

Address

Washington D.C., DC

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Medical Service Corps Leader Development posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services