Medical Service Corps Leader Development

Medical Service Corps Leader Development Create a culture of continuous learning generating adaptive medical leaders capable of leading across the competition/conflict continuum. The opinions expressed on this page are meant to inform, create discussion and fuel intellectual curiosity and do not reflect those of the Medical Service Corps, Army Medical Department, U.S.

Army or the Department of Defense.

Willful Disobedience: Character Traits of Independent Thinkers in the Military Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Mark Mill...
11/24/2021

Willful Disobedience: Character Traits of Independent Thinkers in the Military

Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Mark Milley shared a vision of future conflict and the soldiers engaging in that conflict.

He described his expectation of the future Soldier to be "miserable, disobedient, and victorious.”

Milley predicted that the leadership characteristic that will lead these small, autonomous units to victory is the willingness of first-line leaders to disobey orders.

Leaders MUST exhibit character, risk acceptance, and strategic mindedness.

Character: Demonstration of empathy, its an innate skill that will help leaders foresee the implication of their decisions.

Risk Acceptance: Risk can bring benefits, when a leader sees it like that, you will realize that they understand opportunity cost.

Strategic Mindedness: A disobedient leader has situational awareness and can understand the influence of their decision on the operation or mission. They are usually the leaders that read, ask why, and expand their influence beyond the chain of command.

Leaders are expected to accept failure and demonstrate that to their Soldiers especially when it involves risk-tolerance and decision-making.

How can we recognize when we have a leader we can disobey?

Read the entire article from Modern War Institute here: https://mwi.usma.edu/willful-disobedience

1st Medical Brigade
44th Medical Brigade
30th Medical Brigade
62nd Medical Brigade
65th Medical Brigade
U.S. Army
U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM)
#leadership #leadershipdevelopment

Willful Disobedience: Character Traits of Independent Thinkers in the Military

Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Mark Milley shared a vision of future conflict and the soldiers engaging in that conflict.

He described his expectation of the future Soldier to be "miserable, disobedient, and victorious.”

Milley predicted that the leadership characteristic that will lead these small, autonomous units to victory is the willingness of first-line leaders to disobey orders.

Leaders MUST exhibit character, risk acceptance, and strategic mindedness.

Character: Demonstration of empathy, its an innate skill that will help leaders foresee the implication of their decisions.

Risk Acceptance: Risk can bring benefits, when a leader sees it like that, you will realize that they understand opportunity cost.

Strategic Mindedness: A disobedient leader has situational awareness and can understand the influence of their decision on the operation or mission. They are usually the leaders that read, ask why, and expand their influence beyond the chain of command.

Leaders are expected to accept failure and demonstrate that to their Soldiers especially when it involves risk-tolerance and decision-making.

How can we recognize when we have a leader we can disobey?

Read the entire article from Modern War Institute here: https://mwi.usma.edu/willful-disobedience

1st Medical Brigade
44th Medical Brigade
30th Medical Brigade
62nd Medical Brigade
65th Medical Brigade
U.S. Army
U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM)
#leadership #leadershipdevelopment

Want to See if Someone is a Good Leader? Send Them an Email.Simon Sinek provides a quick litmus test to assess organizat...
11/23/2021
Want to See If Someone Is a Good Leader? Send Them an Email [VIDEO]

Want to See if Someone is a Good Leader? Send Them an Email.

Simon Sinek provides a quick litmus test to assess organizational trust and leadership's confidence in subordinates.

While there are many good reasons to keep your boss on the cc line, it is not always necessary and a requirement to do so may be a symptom of a breakdown in trust.

Do you trust your team when you are on leave or TDY?

How do you demonstrate trust?

Do you inject yourself into processes that distract you from the decisions you should be making?

U.S. Army Chief of Staff
Army Medicine
Army Medical Logistics Command
Army Medicine Civilian Corps
30th Medical Brigade
44th Medical Brigade
1st Medical Brigade
62nd Medical Brigade
65th Medical Brigade
U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence

Author Simon Sinek explains how a seemingly helpful behavior actually reveals a lack of trust.

Adam Grant hosts a podcast on work life balance featuring leaders from all over the world. In this podcast Adam intervie...
11/22/2021

Adam Grant hosts a podcast on work life balance featuring leaders from all over the world. In this podcast Adam interviews former Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi.

She discusses an initiative she started after visiting her mom that aligns with the U.S. Army Chief of Staff's #PeopleFirst initiatives. She wrote letters to families of the people that worked for her highlighting the impact they were having in the organization. Think of it as the "golden triangle" for the civilian sector. Below she talks about why she did it and the result of her efforts.

Adam Grant (AG):
When you first became CEO, you did something really unusual with your senior executives.

Indra Nooyi (IN):
Well, you know, I ran home to India right after I became CEO and my mother was living in India at that time. And, you know, she asked me to sort of show up, dressed up and sit in the living room with her. And I did, and people's time would come in and, you know, people I barely knew came in, they just say, hello, uh, congratulations, like 10 seconds.

And then go sit with my mom and tell her you did such a good job bringing up your daughter. She's brought pride to the family prior to the country. Uh, you know, you should feel so good. But then it made me think to myself and say, Hey, once you turn 18, you don't get a report card on your kids.

So I came back and I said, you know what? Since my direct reports and their direct reports, the top two levels of the company have already made it. It's going to be a good report card. So let me write to the parents and say, thank you for the gift of your child to PepsiCo. So this was not a form letter though.

There's about six paragraphs, three paragraphs talked about why I'm writing them this letter. I didn't want them to get upset or what are you door? You know, why is the chairman writing to me two paragraphs, very specific to that. Very specific what they were contributing, why I thought fantastic. And then there was a closing paragraph and I copied the letter to every employee because sometimes parents didn't speak English.

And I wanted to make sure that when they saw the word chairman, they didn't get scared. And it was the best thing I did at them. Because over my time at PepsiCo, I wrote about to--to 400 executives. I wrote to the spouses and the parents. And I have to tell you the relationship that was set up between me and the parents was just unbelievable.

And the executives just love the fact that the parents now had something to celebrate about their kids on a regular basis. I remember one story of an executive who's of Indian origin. He said to me, his father made a hundred copies of the letters, Saturday, um, ground floor of the apartment building they were living in.

And everybody in the building who came home from work, he gave them a copy of the letter and said, I want you to see what the chairman of PepsiCo thinks of my son. So there was that level of pride that I had, and many, many executives in American companies who read that and then started to write to parents of their executives, said that it was one of the most emotionally amazing things they've ever done for their employees.

AG:
What an incredible way to show people just how much you've had. So I think it's, you know, it won't be a surprise to anybody who knows you, that you have a reputation for being extremely caring and having real concern about the people who work for you.

Listen to the Podcast or read the transcript here: https://www.ted.com/podcasts/worklife/taken-for-granted-indra-nooyi-wants-us-to-reimagine-the-return-to-work-transcript

Army Medicine
The Army Leader Exchange
Centre for Army Leadership
Medical Service Corps Chief
U.S. Air Force Medical Service - AFMS
U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD)
U.S. Army
30th Medical Brigade
44th Medical Brigade
1st Medical Brigade
62nd Medical Brigade
65th Medical Brigade
@18th Medical Command (Deployment Support)

Adam Grant hosts a podcast on work life balance featuring leaders from all over the world. In this podcast Adam interviews former Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi.

She discusses an initiative she started after visiting her mom that aligns with the U.S. Army Chief of Staff's #PeopleFirst initiatives. She wrote letters to families of the people that worked for her highlighting the impact they were having in the organization. Think of it as the "golden triangle" for the civilian sector. Below she talks about why she did it and the result of her efforts.

Adam Grant (AG):
When you first became CEO, you did something really unusual with your senior executives.

Indra Nooyi (IN):
Well, you know, I ran home to India right after I became CEO and my mother was living in India at that time. And, you know, she asked me to sort of show up, dressed up and sit in the living room with her. And I did, and people's time would come in and, you know, people I barely knew came in, they just say, hello, uh, congratulations, like 10 seconds.

And then go sit with my mom and tell her you did such a good job bringing up your daughter. She's brought pride to the family prior to the country. Uh, you know, you should feel so good. But then it made me think to myself and say, Hey, once you turn 18, you don't get a report card on your kids.

So I came back and I said, you know what? Since my direct reports and their direct reports, the top two levels of the company have already made it. It's going to be a good report card. So let me write to the parents and say, thank you for the gift of your child to PepsiCo. So this was not a form letter though.

There's about six paragraphs, three paragraphs talked about why I'm writing them this letter. I didn't want them to get upset or what are you door? You know, why is the chairman writing to me two paragraphs, very specific to that. Very specific what they were contributing, why I thought fantastic. And then there was a closing paragraph and I copied the letter to every employee because sometimes parents didn't speak English.

And I wanted to make sure that when they saw the word chairman, they didn't get scared. And it was the best thing I did at them. Because over my time at PepsiCo, I wrote about to--to 400 executives. I wrote to the spouses and the parents. And I have to tell you the relationship that was set up between me and the parents was just unbelievable.

And the executives just love the fact that the parents now had something to celebrate about their kids on a regular basis. I remember one story of an executive who's of Indian origin. He said to me, his father made a hundred copies of the letters, Saturday, um, ground floor of the apartment building they were living in.

And everybody in the building who came home from work, he gave them a copy of the letter and said, I want you to see what the chairman of PepsiCo thinks of my son. So there was that level of pride that I had, and many, many executives in American companies who read that and then started to write to parents of their executives, said that it was one of the most emotionally amazing things they've ever done for their employees.

AG:
What an incredible way to show people just how much you've had. So I think it's, you know, it won't be a surprise to anybody who knows you, that you have a reputation for being extremely caring and having real concern about the people who work for you.

Listen to the Podcast or read the transcript here: https://www.ted.com/podcasts/worklife/taken-for-granted-indra-nooyi-wants-us-to-reimagine-the-return-to-work-transcript

Army Medicine
The Army Leader Exchange
Centre for Army Leadership
Medical Service Corps Chief
U.S. Air Force Medical Service - AFMS
U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD)
U.S. Army
30th Medical Brigade
44th Medical Brigade
1st Medical Brigade
62nd Medical Brigade
65th Medical Brigade
@18th Medical Command (Deployment Support)

Emotional Intelligence Has 12 Elements. Which Do You Need to Work On?It is unfortunately common for people to confuse em...
11/21/2021

Emotional Intelligence Has 12 Elements. Which Do You Need to Work On?

It is unfortunately common for people to confuse emotional intelligence with sociability, sensitivity, and likability. While helpful, these characteristics are too narrow to ensure effective leadership.

This article by Harvard Business Review posits there are 12 competencies that contribute to emotional intelligence, each of which contribute to the development of a well-balanced and effective leader. The 12 competencies can be binned into four domains.

Self-Awareness:
1. Emotional Self-Awareness

Self-Management:
2. Emotional Self-Control
3. Adaptability
4. Achievement Orientation
5. Positive Outlook

Social Awareness:
6. Empathy
7. Organizational Awareness

Relationship Management:
8. Influence
9. Coach and Mentor
10. Conflict Management
11. Teamwork
12. Inspirational Leadership

Emotional Intelligence is widely recognized as valuable; however, people struggle to develop this leadership competency. Start by conducting a self-assessment underwritten by iterative reflection. Marry this with feedback from a trusted mentor, your supervisor, trusted teammates, and arguably most importantly, your subordinates. Read about each of these competencies and emotional intelligence broadly to develop an action plan to improve. Never stop reflecting, thinking, and striving to be better!

The U.S. Army advances a #PeopleFirst culture. Let's move beyond the tagline and invest in the competencies that enable this culture at the Soldier level!

Read the article here: https://hbr.org/2017/02/emotional-intelligence-has-12-elements-which-do-you-need-to-work-on

1st Medical Brigade 30th Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 62nd Medical Brigade 65th Medical Brigade 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) Army Medicine Medical Service Corps Chief U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence 807th Medical Command (Deployment Support) 3x5 Leadership The Company Leader #lead #ArmyMedicine #mscleaderdevelopment #leadership #emotionalintelligence

It’s the weekend! What’s your plan for resting? Is it strange to think about a rest plan? For many of us, it is. Conside...
11/20/2021

It’s the weekend! What’s your plan for resting?

Is it strange to think about a rest plan? For many of us, it is. Consider the deliberateness with which you need to plan recovery after an operation. Personal rest is just as important; consider planning it!

Here are some reasons why you need rest according to this Forbes article.

1. Rest Heals your Body

2. Rest Reduces Stress

3. Rest Boosts Creativity

4. Rest Improves Productivity

5. Rest Enhances Decision Making

The article also provides some recommendations for resting.

Remember, your ability to care for others, lead, and make decisions is directly influenced by how rested you are daily and consistently.

Make good decisions about rest!

Here is the article: https://www.forbes.com/sites/womensmedia/2021/01/15/the-benefits-of-resting-and-how-to-unplug-in-a-busy-world/

147th Field Hospital 14th Field Hospital 10th Field Hospital 1st Medical Brigade 56th Multifunctional Medical Battalion 75th Ranger Medical 44th Medical Brigade Operational Medicine U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence Medical Service Corps Chief US Army Medical Service Corps, Reserve Components U.S. Air Force Medical Service - AFMS #mscleaderdevelopment #ArmyMedicine #rest #leadership

It’s the weekend! What’s your plan for resting?

Is it strange to think about a rest plan? For many of us, it is. Consider the deliberateness with which you need to plan recovery after an operation. Personal rest is just as important; consider planning it!

Here are some reasons why you need rest according to this Forbes article.

1. Rest Heals your Body

2. Rest Reduces Stress

3. Rest Boosts Creativity

4. Rest Improves Productivity

5. Rest Enhances Decision Making

The article also provides some recommendations for resting.

Remember, your ability to care for others, lead, and make decisions is directly influenced by how rested you are daily and consistently.

Make good decisions about rest!

Here is the article: https://www.forbes.com/sites/womensmedia/2021/01/15/the-benefits-of-resting-and-how-to-unplug-in-a-busy-world/

147th Field Hospital 14th Field Hospital 10th Field Hospital 1st Medical Brigade 56th Multifunctional Medical Battalion 75th Ranger Medical 44th Medical Brigade Operational Medicine U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence Medical Service Corps Chief US Army Medical Service Corps, Reserve Components U.S. Air Force Medical Service - AFMS #mscleaderdevelopment #ArmyMedicine #rest #leadership

Updated Publication *ATP 5-19, Risk Management*Risk, even when not identified, is inherent in everything we do. Understa...
11/19/2021

Updated Publication *ATP 5-19, Risk Management*

Risk, even when not identified, is inherent in everything we do. Understanding risk and learning how to manage it is a key leader task. ATP 5-19, Risk Management adopts a holistic approach addressing composite risk from all sources and integrates into the U.S. Army
decision-making process.

To properly execute risk management, this process must be inculcated into the Army culture. This does NOT mean becoming risk averse. Instead, it should influence the way we think about training and operations to ensure leaders make sound, risk-informed decisions.

Risk Management Defined: the process to identify, assess, and control risks and make decisions that balance risk cost with mission benefits (JP 3-0). The Army uses risk management (RM) to help maintain combat power while ensuring mission accomplishment in current and future operations. RM applies to operations and to nonoperational activities.

The RM steps follow a logical sequence and correlate to teh operations process activities. The steps are:
1. Identify the Hazards
2. Essess the Hazards
3. Develop Controls and make Risk Decisions
4. Implement Controls
5. Supervise and Evaluate

RM Principles:
- Integrate RM into all phases of missions and operations (and training)
- Make risk decisions at the appropriate level
- Accept no unnecessary risk (different than being risk averse)
- Apply RM cyclically and continuously

Other select (abbreviated) highlights:
- All Soldiers apply RM regardless of rank or position
- RM outlines a disciplined approach to express a risk level in terms readily understood at all echelons.
- RM is a deliberate process (other than in time-constrained situations)
- There will often be residual risk; this may be acceptable and necessary
- RM should be documented
- Do not confuse RM analytics with judgment; they are complimentary

Questions for reflection:
- How do you understand and define risk?
- Do you believe the Army is risk averse, makes good RM decisions, or something else?
- Does the culture of your unit support RM?

One additional note. Administrative risk management is not covered in this ATP but is instead covered in AR 385-10; the two publications are designed to be complimentary when used in tandem.

Download your copy of ATP 5-19, RM here: https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/ARN34181-ATP_5-19-000-WEB-1.pdf?fbclid=IwAR1n6c2z8G7NqrcUaUggQ5ojYziSwDHIxnwlL2IbDOAJbU9bVj1NBARuti8

Army Medicine U.S. Army 261st Multifunctional Medical Battalion 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) 14th Field Hospital 1st Medical Brigade U.S. Army Combined Arms Doctrine Directorate 44th Medical Brigade Operational Medicine U.S. Army Mission Command Center of Excellence U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence #ArmyMedicine #riskmanagement #mscleaderdevelopment

Address

Washington D.C., DC

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Medical Service Corps Leader Development posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services


Comments

Willful Disobedience: Character Traits of Independent Thinkers in the Military Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Mark Milley shared a vision of future conflict and the soldiers engaging in that conflict. He described his expectation of the future Soldier to be "miserable, disobedient, and victorious.” Milley predicted that the leadership characteristic that will lead these small, autonomous units to victory is the willingness of first-line leaders to disobey orders. Leaders MUST exhibit character, risk acceptance, and strategic mindedness. Character: Demonstration of empathy, its an innate skill that will help leaders foresee the implication of their decisions. Risk Acceptance: Risk can bring benefits, when a leader sees it like that, you will realize that they understand opportunity cost. Strategic Mindedness: A disobedient leader has situational awareness and can understand the influence of their decision on the operation or mission. They are usually the leaders that read, ask why, and expand their influence beyond the chain of command. Leaders are expected to accept failure and demonstrate that to their Soldiers especially when it involves risk-tolerance and decision-making. How can we recognize when we have a leader we can disobey? Read the entire article from Modern War Institute here: https://mwi.usma.edu/willful-disobedience 1st Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 30th Medical Brigade 62nd Medical Brigade 65th Medical Brigade U.S. Army U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) #leadership #leadershipdevelopment
Want to See if Someone is a Good Leader? Send Them an Email. Simon Sinek provides a quick litmus test to assess organizational trust and leadership's confidence in subordinates. While there are many good reasons to keep your boss on the cc line, it is not always necessary and a requirement to do so may be a symptom of a breakdown in trust. Do you trust your team when you are on leave or TDY? How do you demonstrate trust? Do you inject yourself into processes that distract you from the decisions you should be making? U.S. Army Chief of Staff Army Medicine Army Medical Logistics Command Army Medicine Civilian Corps 30th Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 1st Medical Brigade 62nd Medical Brigade 65th Medical Brigade U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence
Adam Grant hosts a podcast on work life balance featuring leaders from all over the world. In this podcast Adam interviews former Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi. She discusses an initiative she started after visiting her mom that aligns with the U.S. Army Chief of Staff's #PeopleFirst initiatives. She wrote letters to families of the people that worked for her highlighting the impact they were having in the organization. Think of it as the "golden triangle" for the civilian sector. Below she talks about why she did it and the result of her efforts. Adam Grant (AG): When you first became CEO, you did something really unusual with your senior executives. Indra Nooyi (IN): Well, you know, I ran home to India right after I became CEO and my mother was living in India at that time. And, you know, she asked me to sort of show up, dressed up and sit in the living room with her. And I did, and people's time would come in and, you know, people I barely knew came in, they just say, hello, uh, congratulations, like 10 seconds. And then go sit with my mom and tell her you did such a good job bringing up your daughter. She's brought pride to the family prior to the country. Uh, you know, you should feel so good. But then it made me think to myself and say, Hey, once you turn 18, you don't get a report card on your kids. So I came back and I said, you know what? Since my direct reports and their direct reports, the top two levels of the company have already made it. It's going to be a good report card. So let me write to the parents and say, thank you for the gift of your child to PepsiCo. So this was not a form letter though. There's about six paragraphs, three paragraphs talked about why I'm writing them this letter. I didn't want them to get upset or what are you door? You know, why is the chairman writing to me two paragraphs, very specific to that. Very specific what they were contributing, why I thought fantastic. And then there was a closing paragraph and I copied the letter to every employee because sometimes parents didn't speak English. And I wanted to make sure that when they saw the word chairman, they didn't get scared. And it was the best thing I did at them. Because over my time at PepsiCo, I wrote about to--to 400 executives. I wrote to the spouses and the parents. And I have to tell you the relationship that was set up between me and the parents was just unbelievable. And the executives just love the fact that the parents now had something to celebrate about their kids on a regular basis. I remember one story of an executive who's of Indian origin. He said to me, his father made a hundred copies of the letters, Saturday, um, ground floor of the apartment building they were living in. And everybody in the building who came home from work, he gave them a copy of the letter and said, I want you to see what the chairman of PepsiCo thinks of my son. So there was that level of pride that I had, and many, many executives in American companies who read that and then started to write to parents of their executives, said that it was one of the most emotionally amazing things they've ever done for their employees. AG: What an incredible way to show people just how much you've had. So I think it's, you know, it won't be a surprise to anybody who knows you, that you have a reputation for being extremely caring and having real concern about the people who work for you. Listen to the Podcast or read the transcript here: https://www.ted.com/podcasts/worklife/taken-for-granted-indra-nooyi-wants-us-to-reimagine-the-return-to-work-transcript Army Medicine The Army Leader Exchange Centre for Army Leadership Medical Service Corps Chief U.S. Air Force Medical Service - AFMS U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) U.S. Army 30th Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 1st Medical Brigade 62nd Medical Brigade 65th Medical Brigade @18th Medical Command (Deployment Support)
Emotional Intelligence Has 12 Elements. Which Do You Need to Work On? It is unfortunately common for people to confuse emotional intelligence with sociability, sensitivity, and likability. While helpful, these characteristics are too narrow to ensure effective leadership. This article by Harvard Business Review posits there are 12 competencies that contribute to emotional intelligence, each of which contribute to the development of a well-balanced and effective leader. The 12 competencies can be binned into four domains. Self-Awareness: 1. Emotional Self-Awareness Self-Management: 2. Emotional Self-Control 3. Adaptability 4. Achievement Orientation 5. Positive Outlook Social Awareness: 6. Empathy 7. Organizational Awareness Relationship Management: 8. Influence 9. Coach and Mentor 10. Conflict Management 11. Teamwork 12. Inspirational Leadership Emotional Intelligence is widely recognized as valuable; however, people struggle to develop this leadership competency. Start by conducting a self-assessment underwritten by iterative reflection. Marry this with feedback from a trusted mentor, your supervisor, trusted teammates, and arguably most importantly, your subordinates. Read about each of these competencies and emotional intelligence broadly to develop an action plan to improve. Never stop reflecting, thinking, and striving to be better! The U.S. Army advances a #PeopleFirst culture. Let's move beyond the tagline and invest in the competencies that enable this culture at the Soldier level! Read the article here: https://hbr.org/2017/02/emotional-intelligence-has-12-elements-which-do-you-need-to-work-on 1st Medical Brigade 30th Medical Brigade 44th Medical Brigade 62nd Medical Brigade 65th Medical Brigade 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) Army Medicine Medical Service Corps Chief U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence 807th Medical Command (Deployment Support) 3x5 Leadership The Company Leader #lead #ArmyMedicine #mscleaderdevelopment #leadership #emotionalintelligence
It’s the weekend! What’s your plan for resting? Is it strange to think about a rest plan? For many of us, it is. Consider the deliberateness with which you need to plan recovery after an operation. Personal rest is just as important; consider planning it! Here are some reasons why you need rest according to this Forbes article. 1. Rest Heals your Body 2. Rest Reduces Stress 3. Rest Boosts Creativity 4. Rest Improves Productivity 5. Rest Enhances Decision Making The article also provides some recommendations for resting. Remember, your ability to care for others, lead, and make decisions is directly influenced by how rested you are daily and consistently. Make good decisions about rest! Here is the article: https://www.forbes.com/sites/womensmedia/2021/01/15/the-benefits-of-resting-and-how-to-unplug-in-a-busy-world/ 147th Field Hospital 14th Field Hospital 10th Field Hospital 1st Medical Brigade 56th Multifunctional Medical Battalion 75th Ranger Medical 44th Medical Brigade Operational Medicine U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence Medical Service Corps Chief US Army Medical Service Corps, Reserve Components U.S. Air Force Medical Service - AFMS #mscleaderdevelopment #ArmyMedicine #rest #leadership
Updated Publication *ATP 5-19, Risk Management* Risk, even when not identified, is inherent in everything we do. Understanding risk and learning how to manage it is a key leader task. ATP 5-19, Risk Management adopts a holistic approach addressing composite risk from all sources and integrates into the U.S. Army decision-making process. To properly execute risk management, this process must be inculcated into the Army culture. This does NOT mean becoming risk averse. Instead, it should influence the way we think about training and operations to ensure leaders make sound, risk-informed decisions. Risk Management Defined: the process to identify, assess, and control risks and make decisions that balance risk cost with mission benefits (JP 3-0). The Army uses risk management (RM) to help maintain combat power while ensuring mission accomplishment in current and future operations. RM applies to operations and to nonoperational activities. The RM steps follow a logical sequence and correlate to teh operations process activities. The steps are: 1. Identify the Hazards 2. Essess the Hazards 3. Develop Controls and make Risk Decisions 4. Implement Controls 5. Supervise and Evaluate RM Principles: - Integrate RM into all phases of missions and operations (and training) - Make risk decisions at the appropriate level - Accept no unnecessary risk (different than being risk averse) - Apply RM cyclically and continuously Other select (abbreviated) highlights: - All Soldiers apply RM regardless of rank or position - RM outlines a disciplined approach to express a risk level in terms readily understood at all echelons. - RM is a deliberate process (other than in time-constrained situations) - There will often be residual risk; this may be acceptable and necessary - RM should be documented - Do not confuse RM analytics with judgment; they are complimentary Questions for reflection: - How do you understand and define risk? - Do you believe the Army is risk averse, makes good RM decisions, or something else? - Does the culture of your unit support RM? One additional note. Administrative risk management is not covered in this ATP but is instead covered in AR 385-10; the two publications are designed to be complimentary when used in tandem. Download your copy of ATP 5-19, RM here: https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/ARN34181-ATP_5-19-000-WEB-1.pdf?fbclid=IwAR1n6c2z8G7NqrcUaUggQ5ojYziSwDHIxnwlL2IbDOAJbU9bVj1NBARuti8 Army Medicine U.S. Army 261st Multifunctional Medical Battalion 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) 14th Field Hospital 1st Medical Brigade U.S. Army Combined Arms Doctrine Directorate 44th Medical Brigade Operational Medicine U.S. Army Mission Command Center of Excellence U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence #ArmyMedicine #riskmanagement #mscleaderdevelopment