National Mall and Memorial Parks

National Mall and Memorial Parks Welcome to the official page for the National Mall and Memorial Parks. For visitor information, visit http://www.nps.gov/nama. National Mall and Memorial Parks was established in 1965, incorporating existing park spaces and memorials in Washington, D.C.

The park is administered by the National Park Service. The 6,546 acres park was established to commemorate presidential legacies, honor the courage and sacrifice of war veterans, and celebrate the United States' commitment to freedom and equality. Park Hours
Park is open to the public every day of the year, 24 hours a day. Park rangers are on duty at monument and memorial sites from approximately

The park is administered by the National Park Service. The 6,546 acres park was established to commemorate presidential legacies, honor the courage and sacrifice of war veterans, and celebrate the United States' commitment to freedom and equality. Park Hours
Park is open to the public every day of the year, 24 hours a day. Park rangers are on duty at monument and memorial sites from approximately

Operating as usual

Winter can be a good time to stay indoors and play games with friends and family. But no matter the weather, you'll alwa...
01/10/2022

Winter can be a good time to stay indoors and play games with friends and family. But no matter the weather, you'll always find these two gentlemen playing chess in John Marshall Park just off the National Mall. "The Chess Players" sculpture by artist Lloyd Lillie was installed in 1983 and modeled off of members of his family. Dressed in three-piece suits and hovering over a chess board, the sculpture is meant to represent lawyers having a friendly competition after battling it out in the nearby courthouse. It's another wonderful example of public art in our nation's capital.

Photo by National Park Service.

Winter can be a good time to stay indoors and play games with friends and family. But no matter the weather, you'll always find these two gentlemen playing chess in John Marshall Park just off the National Mall. "The Chess Players" sculpture by artist Lloyd Lillie was installed in 1983 and modeled off of members of his family. Dressed in three-piece suits and hovering over a chess board, the sculpture is meant to represent lawyers having a friendly competition after battling it out in the nearby courthouse. It's another wonderful example of public art in our nation's capital.

Photo by National Park Service.

Timeline Photos
01/09/2022

Timeline Photos

Please take a paws to thank and appreciate all our Interior law enforcement personnel (even the furry ones) who help protect our public lands and wildlife.

We are grateful for your service and your dedicated professionalism. Thank you. #LawEnforcementAppreciationDay

Photo of K-9 high fives at Pinnacles National Park, by NPS.

As our first president, George Washington performed a lot of presidential firsts, including giving the first State of th...
01/08/2022

As our first president, George Washington performed a lot of presidential firsts, including giving the first State of the Union speech to Congress on January 9, 1790. Fulfilling his obligation from Article II, Section 3, Clause 1 of the U.S. Constitution, which states that the President, “shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient,” Washington gave his views on the progress made by the young government, set some goals, and offered words of encouragement to Congress and the public.

With hope and confidence, Washington closed with "The welfare of our Country is the great object to which our cares and efforts ought to be directed. And I shall derive great satisfaction from a co-operation with you, in the pleasing though arduous task of ensuring to our fellow Citizens the blessings, which they have a right to expect, from a free, efficient and equal Government."

The 2021 Volunteer Group of the Year on the National Mall was awarded to the 89th Maintenance Group of Joint Base Andrew...
01/07/2022

The 2021 Volunteer Group of the Year on the National Mall was awarded to the 89th Maintenance Group of Joint Base Andrews. The dedicated team completed multiple service projects on the National Mall last year, helping preserve the park's natural and cultural resources. From hand cleaning the artistic panels and Wall of Stars in the World War II Memorial to assisting with the care of the beloved cherry trees, the 89th Maintenance Group helped the National Mall provide visitors with an extraordinary experience. We're so thankful for these dependable volunteers.

The 2021 Volunteer Group of the Year on the National Mall was awarded to the 89th Maintenance Group of Joint Base Andrews. The dedicated team completed multiple service projects on the National Mall last year, helping preserve the park's natural and cultural resources. From hand cleaning the artistic panels and Wall of Stars in the World War II Memorial to assisting with the care of the beloved cherry trees, the 89th Maintenance Group helped the National Mall provide visitors with an extraordinary experience. We're so thankful for these dependable volunteers.

01/07/2022

The Washington Monument and Ford's Theatre National Historic Site will be closed on Friday, January 7, due to inclement weather.

It's National Bird Day, so let's share this recent picture of a black-crowned night heron hanging out by the Washington ...
01/05/2022

It's National Bird Day, so let's share this recent picture of a black-crowned night heron hanging out by the Washington Channel near the Outlet Bridge. These cool birds can fly up to 35 miles an hour and like to hunt at dusk and dawn to avoid competition with other heron species. Their scientific name is Nycticorax nycticorax, which means "night raven."

If you want to help birds thrive, you can do a few simple things:

Keep your pets away from wildlife. Domestic animals can kill birds and scare them away from their natural habitat. Please leash your pets on the National Mall.

Make windows visible to birds. To mitigate bird-window collisions, we utilized a pattern on the windows at the Eisenhower Memorial visitor center so birds can see the window and won't fly into it.

Buy native plants. Birds prefer food and shelter provided by native flora.

Reduce plastic and pesticide use to keep forests, wetlands, and fields safe for birds.

Photo by National Park Service.

It's National Bird Day, so let's share this recent picture of a black-crowned night heron hanging out by the Washington Channel near the Outlet Bridge. These cool birds can fly up to 35 miles an hour and like to hunt at dusk and dawn to avoid competition with other heron species. Their scientific name is Nycticorax nycticorax, which means "night raven."

If you want to help birds thrive, you can do a few simple things:

Keep your pets away from wildlife. Domestic animals can kill birds and scare them away from their natural habitat. Please leash your pets on the National Mall.

Make windows visible to birds. To mitigate bird-window collisions, we utilized a pattern on the windows at the Eisenhower Memorial visitor center so birds can see the window and won't fly into it.

Buy native plants. Birds prefer food and shelter provided by native flora.

Reduce plastic and pesticide use to keep forests, wetlands, and fields safe for birds.

Photo by National Park Service.

01/05/2022

Due to poor travel conditions in the city, the Washington Monument and Ford's Theatre National Historic Site will open at noon on Wednesday, January 5.

Don't say it... don't say it...We're walking in a Winter Wonderland! The blanket of white snow decorates the National Ma...
01/04/2022

Don't say it... don't say it...

We're walking in a Winter Wonderland! The blanket of white snow decorates the National Mall like frosting on a cake. Against a bright blue sky, everything looks lovely. Come take a walk if you can, but watch your step.

Photos by National Park Service.

While many of us have enjoyed some rest and relaxation the last few weeks, work has moved along at the Korean War Vetera...
01/04/2022

While many of us have enjoyed some rest and relaxation the last few weeks, work has moved along at the Korean War Veterans Memorial. Behind the construction fence, upgrades are being made to the Pool of Remembrance and the electrical system. But the big news is the installation of the new memorial panels. These large stone panels include the names of 36,574 American servicemen and more than 7,200 members of the Korean Augmentation to the United States Army who gave their lives defending the people of South Korea. We're excited to see them all in place.

Photo by Dan Arant, National Park Service volunteer.

While many of us have enjoyed some rest and relaxation the last few weeks, work has moved along at the Korean War Veterans Memorial. Behind the construction fence, upgrades are being made to the Pool of Remembrance and the electrical system. But the big news is the installation of the new memorial panels. These large stone panels include the names of 36,574 American servicemen and more than 7,200 members of the Korean Augmentation to the United States Army who gave their lives defending the people of South Korea. We're excited to see them all in place.

Photo by Dan Arant, National Park Service volunteer.

The weather today makes a post about Alaska seem even more appropriate...Above the colonnade of the Lincoln Memorial, th...
01/03/2022

The weather today makes a post about Alaska seem even more appropriate...

Above the colonnade of the Lincoln Memorial, the lower frieze shows the names of the 36 states at the time of Lincoln's presidency inscribed in the order they entered the Union. Above that, the names of the 48 states at the time of the memorial's dedication are carved in to the attic frieze. To make sure all that the states are represented, a stone was later added to the plaza in front of the memorial recognizing the addition of Hawaii and Alaska - which became a state on this day in 1959.

After Lincoln's assassination in 1865, Secretary of State William Seward stayed on as part of President Andrew Johnson's Cabinet and in 1867, negotiated the sale of Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million. Despite its massive size, the deal was sometimes ridiculed as "Seward's Folly." However, the discovery of gold and oil, plus its strategic location during World War II and the Cold War proved Alaska to be an important part of our nation. After a great deal of political maneuvering, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a proclamation in 1958 admitting Alaska as a state on January 3, 1959. Hawaii followed as the 50th state later that year.

Photo by National Park Service.

The weather today makes a post about Alaska seem even more appropriate...

Above the colonnade of the Lincoln Memorial, the lower frieze shows the names of the 36 states at the time of Lincoln's presidency inscribed in the order they entered the Union. Above that, the names of the 48 states at the time of the memorial's dedication are carved in to the attic frieze. To make sure all that the states are represented, a stone was later added to the plaza in front of the memorial recognizing the addition of Hawaii and Alaska - which became a state on this day in 1959.

After Lincoln's assassination in 1865, Secretary of State William Seward stayed on as part of President Andrew Johnson's Cabinet and in 1867, negotiated the sale of Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million. Despite its massive size, the deal was sometimes ridiculed as "Seward's Folly." However, the discovery of gold and oil, plus its strategic location during World War II and the Cold War proved Alaska to be an important part of our nation. After a great deal of political maneuvering, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a proclamation in 1958 admitting Alaska as a state on January 3, 1959. Hawaii followed as the 50th state later that year.

Photo by National Park Service.

01/03/2022

Due to inclement weather, the Washington Monument and Ford's Theatre National Historic Site will be closed to the public on Monday, January 3.

Happy New Year! We hope your 2022 plans include a visit to Washington, D.C. and a tour of the National Mall. From quiet ...
01/01/2022

Happy New Year! We hope your 2022 plans include a visit to Washington, D.C. and a tour of the National Mall. From quiet winter walks to the bustling Cherry Blossom spring through long summer days and gorgeous fall displays, we're excited to share the scenes and stories of America's Front Yard with the world. See you soon!

Photo of July 4th fireworks over the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial by National Park Service.

Happy New Year! We hope your 2022 plans include a visit to Washington, D.C. and a tour of the National Mall. From quiet winter walks to the bustling Cherry Blossom spring through long summer days and gorgeous fall displays, we're excited to share the scenes and stories of America's Front Yard with the world. See you soon!

Photo of July 4th fireworks over the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial by National Park Service.

In September of 1862, energized by the defeat of the Confederate invasion into Maryland, President Abraham Lincoln issue...
01/01/2022

In September of 1862, energized by the defeat of the Confederate invasion into Maryland, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, stating that he would use his war powers to free all the slaves in any state "in rebellion against the United States" on January 1, 1863. Making good on that promise, the Emancipation Proclamation went into effect 159 years ago today. As he prepared to sign the document, Lincoln declared, "I never in my life felt more certain that I was doing right than I do in signing this paper... if my name ever goes into history it will be for this act, and my whole soul is in it."

The Emancipation Proclamation had a profound influence on the course of the war and the institution of slavery. In addition to setting the stage for the freedom of millions of former enslaved people, it was also a decisive war measure. It deprived the South of valuable labor for its war effort as thousands fled to nearby Union camps, and historians believe that it influenced the decision of England and France not to intervene on behalf of the Confederacy. It also allowed nearly 180,000 former slaves and free blacks to serve and fight alongside their countrymen as United States Colored Troops. Although his famous proclamation did not immediately free all the enslaved people, many Black Americans saw Lincoln as a savior. Official legal freedom for the enslaved came in December 1865 with the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution that abolished slavery.

The Lincoln Memorial honors the man who saved the Union and helped end slavery in our country. Visiting this hallowed building and paying tribute to one of our greatest presidents is a highlight for many visitors to the National Mall.

As we come to the end of 2021, let's share one of our most popular pictures from this year: a stunning sunset over the J...
12/31/2021

As we come to the end of 2021, let's share one of our most popular pictures from this year: a stunning sunset over the Jefferson Memorial.

Thanks to all the visitors, volunteers, partners, and staff who make the National Mall such a special place. We hope to see more of you in the new year.

Photo by National Park Service.

As we come to the end of 2021, let's share one of our most popular pictures from this year: a stunning sunset over the Jefferson Memorial.

Thanks to all the visitors, volunteers, partners, and staff who make the National Mall such a special place. We hope to see more of you in the new year.

Photo by National Park Service.

Just in case you're already planning some trips in 2022...
12/30/2021

Just in case you're already planning some trips in 2022...

Hello, is it free you're looking for? On five days in 2022, all National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer FREE admission to everyone. Where would you like to go?

Mark your calendar for these entrance fee–free dates:
📣 1/17 - Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
🤠 4/16 - First day of National Park Week
🌲 8/4 - Anniversary of the Great American Outdoors Act
🗻 9/24 - National Public Lands Day
🥾 11/11 - Veterans Day

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/fee-free-days-2022.htm

Image: A visitor to Dinosaur National Monument enjoys the view from the Harpers Corner Trail. NPS/Nick Guarino

On this day in 1808, Andrew Johnson was born in Raleigh, North Carolina. After the election of President Abraham Lincoln...
12/29/2021

On this day in 1808, Andrew Johnson was born in Raleigh, North Carolina. After the election of President Abraham Lincoln in 1860, several southern states announced their secession from the Union. As a senator from Tennessee, Johnson remained steady in his support for the Union despite extreme pressure from his Southern colleagues. He was the only senator from a rebel state to remain loyal to the Union, serving out his term through March, 1862. After a term as Military Governor of Tennessee, Lincoln picked Johnson as his vice-presidential running mate on a unity ticket in 1864. When Lincoln was re-elected, Johnson became Vice President, and then assumed the office of the President when Lincoln was assassinated in April, 1865.

Johnson's presidency centered on bringing the country back together after the Civil War. Reconstruction politics pitted President Johnson against Congress in a conflict that ended with his impeachment in 1867. He avoided removal from office by the Senate by only a single vote. This political battle has tended to overshadow the more successful aspects of his presidency like the ratification of the 13th Amendment ending slavery, the acquisition of Alaska from Russia, and the construction of the first transcontinental railroad across America. After leaving the White House, Johnson became the only former president to return to the Senate. Elected in 1875, he served for several months before he died of a stroke on July 31, 1875.

Photo of Andrew Johnson from the Library of Congress. Photo of the Lincoln Memorial by National Park Service.

With morale in the Continental Army at a low and the American Revolution on the verge of collapse, General George Washin...
12/26/2021

With morale in the Continental Army at a low and the American Revolution on the verge of collapse, General George Washington planned a daring attack to give new energy to the Patriot cause. Crossing the Delaware River during the night – as immortalized in the famous painting – Washington's forces assaulted a garrison of Hessian troops – allies to the British – at Trenton, New Jersey, 245 years ago today.

As the sun rose, Washington rode out in front of his men, leading the charge into Trenton. The Hessians were caught off guard, but quickly organized to resist. However, the Americans swiftly surrounded them and won a brief artillery duel. With their commander dead, the Hessians had no choice but to surrender. In a remarkable victory, Washington's army took 900 prisoners and captured tons of needed arms and supplies. Though the battle was small, it had an important impact. Enlistments in the Continental Army soared and the troops fought with a newfound confidence. 1776 ended with hope.

The legend of George Washington grew. Paintings, songs, statues, and other tributes to him were created during the Revolution and its aftermath. In the original plans for the capital city, a central place was reserved for a monument to Washington. Though it took longer to build than planned, the marvelous monument still stands in the heart of Washington, D.C. on the National Mall.

Painting of Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze.

With morale in the Continental Army at a low and the American Revolution on the verge of collapse, General George Washington planned a daring attack to give new energy to the Patriot cause. Crossing the Delaware River during the night – as immortalized in the famous painting – Washington's forces assaulted a garrison of Hessian troops – allies to the British – at Trenton, New Jersey, 245 years ago today.

As the sun rose, Washington rode out in front of his men, leading the charge into Trenton. The Hessians were caught off guard, but quickly organized to resist. However, the Americans swiftly surrounded them and won a brief artillery duel. With their commander dead, the Hessians had no choice but to surrender. In a remarkable victory, Washington's army took 900 prisoners and captured tons of needed arms and supplies. Though the battle was small, it had an important impact. Enlistments in the Continental Army soared and the troops fought with a newfound confidence. 1776 ended with hope.

The legend of George Washington grew. Paintings, songs, statues, and other tributes to him were created during the Revolution and its aftermath. In the original plans for the capital city, a central place was reserved for a monument to Washington. Though it took longer to build than planned, the marvelous monument still stands in the heart of Washington, D.C. on the National Mall.

Painting of Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze.

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900 Ohio Dr SW
Washington D.C., DC
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Winter can be a good time to stay indoors and play games with friends and family. But no matter the weather, you'll always find these two gentlemen playing chess in John Marshall Park just off the National Mall. "The Chess Players" sculpture by artist Lloyd Lillie was installed in 1983 and modeled off of members of his family. Dressed in three-piece suits and hovering over a chess board, the sculpture is meant to represent lawyers having a friendly competition after battling it out in the nearby courthouse. It's another wonderful example of public art in our nation's capital. Photo by National Park Service.
As our first president, George Washington performed a lot of presidential firsts, including giving the first State of the Union speech to Congress on January 9, 1790. Fulfilling his obligation from Article II, Section 3, Clause 1 of the U.S. Constitution, which states that the President, “shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient,” Washington gave his views on the progress made by the young government, set some goals, and offered words of encouragement to Congress and the public. With hope and confidence, Washington closed with "The welfare of our Country is the great object to which our cares and efforts ought to be directed. And I shall derive great satisfaction from a co-operation with you, in the pleasing though arduous task of ensuring to our fellow Citizens the blessings, which they have a right to expect, from a free, efficient and equal Government."
The 2021 Volunteer Group of the Year on the National Mall was awarded to the 89th Maintenance Group of Joint Base Andrews. The dedicated team completed multiple service projects on the National Mall last year, helping preserve the park's natural and cultural resources. From hand cleaning the artistic panels and Wall of Stars in the World War II Memorial to assisting with the care of the beloved cherry trees, the 89th Maintenance Group helped the National Mall provide visitors with an extraordinary experience. We're so thankful for these dependable volunteers.
The Washington Monument and Ford's Theatre National Historic Site will be closed on Friday, January 7, due to inclement weather.
It's National Bird Day, so let's share this recent picture of a black-crowned night heron hanging out by the Washington Channel near the Outlet Bridge. These cool birds can fly up to 35 miles an hour and like to hunt at dusk and dawn to avoid competition with other heron species. Their scientific name is Nycticorax nycticorax, which means "night raven." If you want to help birds thrive, you can do a few simple things: Keep your pets away from wildlife. Domestic animals can kill birds and scare them away from their natural habitat. Please leash your pets on the National Mall. Make windows visible to birds. To mitigate bird-window collisions, we utilized a pattern on the windows at the Eisenhower Memorial visitor center so birds can see the window and won't fly into it. Buy native plants. Birds prefer food and shelter provided by native flora. Reduce plastic and pesticide use to keep forests, wetlands, and fields safe for birds. Photo by National Park Service.
Due to poor travel conditions in the city, the Washington Monument and Ford's Theatre National Historic Site will open at noon on Wednesday, January 5.
Don't say it... don't say it... We're walking in a Winter Wonderland! The blanket of white snow decorates the National Mall like frosting on a cake. Against a bright blue sky, everything looks lovely. Come take a walk if you can, but watch your step. Photos by National Park Service.
While many of us have enjoyed some rest and relaxation the last few weeks, work has moved along at the Korean War Veterans Memorial. Behind the construction fence, upgrades are being made to the Pool of Remembrance and the electrical system. But the big news is the installation of the new memorial panels. These large stone panels include the names of 36,574 American servicemen and more than 7,200 members of the Korean Augmentation to the United States Army who gave their lives defending the people of South Korea. We're excited to see them all in place. Photo by Dan Arant, National Park Service volunteer.
The weather today makes a post about Alaska seem even more appropriate... Above the colonnade of the Lincoln Memorial, the lower frieze shows the names of the 36 states at the time of Lincoln's presidency inscribed in the order they entered the Union. Above that, the names of the 48 states at the time of the memorial's dedication are carved in to the attic frieze. To make sure all that the states are represented, a stone was later added to the plaza in front of the memorial recognizing the addition of Hawaii and Alaska - which became a state on this day in 1959. After Lincoln's assassination in 1865, Secretary of State William Seward stayed on as part of President Andrew Johnson's Cabinet and in 1867, negotiated the sale of Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million. Despite its massive size, the deal was sometimes ridiculed as "Seward's Folly." However, the discovery of gold and oil, plus its strategic location during World War II and the Cold War proved Alaska to be an important part of our nation. After a great deal of political maneuvering, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a proclamation in 1958 admitting Alaska as a state on January 3, 1959. Hawaii followed as the 50th state later that year. Photo by National Park Service.
Due to inclement weather, the Washington Monument and Ford's Theatre National Historic Site will be closed to the public on Monday, January 3.